Wilfred Heaton's Praise - as a contest march?

toby hobson

Member
Do John Carrs two Marches "Bramwyn" and "Glemdene" get any outings at WF ? I used to think they were modern, but they must have been written in the 1960s.

~ Mr Wilx
Wardle High were out with Glemdene, and sounded brilliant. A terrific sound, a cracking march.
 

Matthew

Active Member
I have to say that I'm quite bored (as a spectator moreso than player, but it's almost equal!) with many marches. Heard one, heard 'em all most of the time! :D It's refreshing to hear/play something different. :cool:
 

GJG

Well-Known Member
however, the DC ending is quite tame.
It's interesting; I think this is true of a significant proportion of SA marches. Whereas many of the the "classic" contest marches are quite clearly designed to be played with the DC, and sound more musically balanced ending at the fine, with many SA marches, it's as though the DC has been added as a formality, and the composers didn't seriously expect it to be observed, therefore they often have more convincing endings at the "bottom of the page". There are exceptions of course, but I can think of more marches that sound better without the DC than with.
 

MoominDave

Well-Known Member
Very few things do work convincingly for trombone quartet - it's a very musically limited grouping. Fun to play in but tends to leave the audience wondering what the point was.
 
For the Australian band championships each band must perform a march (ie while sat on the stage - there is also a street march but not what I'm talking about here). The march must be chosen from the prescribed list of approved marches: http://nbca.asn.au/images/stories/files/nbca brass prescribed march list 2013.pdf

I think if you want to do one not on the list you can submit to the powers that be who will add it to the list of give you the thumbs down as they see fit.

A good resource if you want to be reminded of some lesser known gems, also a reminder of the lunacy of contesting regulations.

Happily, 'Praise' makes the list!
I love this list! I get a march on it (Jubilee) and so does my late grandfather (Norwich Citadel).
 
It's interesting; I think this is true of a significant proportion of SA marches. Whereas many of the the "classic" contest marches are quite clearly designed to be played with the DC, and sound more musically balanced ending at the fine, with many SA marches, it's as though the DC has been added as a formality, and the composers didn't seriously expect it to be observed, therefore they often have more convincing endings at the "bottom of the page". There are exceptions of course, but I can think of more marches that sound better without the DC than with.
Eric Ball's Torchbearers is an exception. Fantastic played with the Da Capo, pretty nondescript ending when you don't use the Da Capo. For most of the rest, SA marches seem to end better at the bottom of the page.
 

Red Elvis

Active Member
It's interesting; I think this is true of a significant proportion of SA marches. Whereas many of the the "classic" contest marches are quite clearly designed to be played with the DC, and sound more musically balanced ending at the fine, with many SA marches, it's as though the DC has been added as a formality, and the composers didn't seriously expect it to be observed, therefore they often have more convincing endings at the "bottom of the page". There are exceptions of course, but I can think of more marches that sound better without the DC than with.
With the exception of "Torchbearers" as noted above , I can't recall ever playing a DC when either marching or in a musical festival / meeting in my SA days. Took me a while to get used to a DC in a "contest" march being the rule rather than the exception
 

nethers

Active Member
I heard once that SA publishers were pretty heavy-handed in the editing room back in the day, this was suggested as a reason for many of these DCs. Would be interesting if anyone could get hold of a surviving composer to find out!
 

Red Elvis

Active Member
I heard once that SA publishers were pretty heavy-handed in the editing room back in the day, this was suggested as a reason for many of these DCs. Would be interesting if anyone could get hold of a surviving composer to find out!
Brian Bowen posts here very occasionally , wonder if he will know ?
 

PeterBale

Moderator
Staff member
It's interesting to note that several of R S-A's marches are written through, presumably as he didn't want to write a DC and find it being ignored.
 

Brian Bowen

Active Member
One reason for writing da capos in marches was to satisfy musical tradition and end in the home (initial) key. It also provided a formal balance. As marches have become more innovative, particularly in the SA perhaps, there’s been a tendency to break the mould.

As to heavy-handedness in former days of the SA’s music editorial dept., I couldn’t possibly comment.;) I will say that but for the editorial skills available in times past, some less-musically literate writers would not have had their music published by the SA.
 
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