Why the dislike of carrolling and xmas music

toptutti

Member
I may be sad but this this the first year I've not been carolling and I've missed it
New Years resolution, find a new band
 

Getzonica

Active Member
Finished my caroling for this year on Christmas Eve and enjoyed every minute of it!

My band did, all except 2, engagements inside this year which was great.
 

JohnnyEuph

Member
If you're trying to get back in (like me) it's probably the perfect time - no pressure, lots of playing the same thing so you get the feel back!
 
The question posed by this thread is why do you dislike carolling and as I said, the main reason I dislike it is that the music is so poor. I'm afraid as a bass player, every Christmas arrangement is just playing oompahs and does become monotonous. That is a personal thing. I find carolling to be be a mixed experience, playing outside a local Waitrose was always very nice, but a former band withdrew from the town Victorian Fair because that became the annual target for drunken antisocial teenagers.

I do not dispute that the public might enjoy listening to the music and it is always nice to have an appreciative audience, but for me, Christmas arrangements are on the whole not enjoyable to play.

We were out yesterday playing in the middle of the city. The council had supplied no chairs so I had to stand with a BB for 2 hours, the place we were given to play was where the smokers sat down to smoke and a group of cider officianados spent the time we played sharing large volumes of dring amongst themselves. I helped out at a band for a lights switch on the other week and was drenched in one of the worst hailstorms I have seen in years. It's not all wonderful when out carolling and the arrangements are not to my taste.

Now, where did I leave those humbugs?
Leave some for me....I m having December off each year.
 

Getzonica

Active Member
Caroling is one of the things I enjoy most. This year I didn't do any outside caroling and we recieved some lovely comments and I had a lot of fun.
 

Aussie Tuba

Member
Caroling is one of the things I enjoy most. This year I didn't do any outside caroling and we recieved some lovely comments and I had a lot of fun.

we also had some great feedback. and I find my lip is at it's best by the time we get to Christmas. so it's good practise too.
 

Bungle

Member
Our band only does two Carolling jobs and I unfortunately missed one. But we enjoyed our Carol concert in a church so much that in the pub after we decided to get our instruments out and carry on playing.
 

Aussie Tuba

Member
Our band only does two Carolling jobs and I unfortunately missed one. But we enjoyed our Carol concert in a church so much that in the pub after we decided to get our instruments out and carry on playing.

I can imagine that the extra concert in the Pub would have been well received by all. I have done a few of those here in Australia ( mainly Licenced Resterants ) But all well received.
 

Par10

Member
Carrolling is well and truley over now, I am glad that I did not have just two chances to play carols, but had many.

My carrolling involved indoor concerts in local halls, a Cathedral and in sheltered accomodation for the elderly and a school for the severley educationally challenged. A Church Carol concert and carols around the village christmas tree with about 8" of snow on the ground.

I was very fortunate to finish my carroling season on the 23rd December with a vist to a local hospital where a small group of us played in the ward for children who have sufferred brain injuries/trauma, this is the third year we have been invited to play there and our playing is always well recieved by the children, families and staff.

I hope all those who have read and contributed to this thread had a happy Christmas and for those of you that do not get any pleasure out of Carrolling, please take some satisfaction out of the simple fact that there are plenty of people out there who do enjoy your playing, who cannot play the carols for themselves and rely on you for that enjoyment.
 

WoodenFlugel

Moderator
Staff member
All done for another year. I guess I was one of the last people here to finish - our last job is a long-standing jaunt around the streets near the bandroom on Boxing Day. The band have been out on Boxing Day for - oh I don't know how many years - it must be well over 40.

It gets increasingly difficult to sort a band out though - we used to get enough players for 3 small bands, that dwindled to 2, then more recently (last 10 years) enough for just 1. The band that goes out now is made up of a few current members, with some lapsed players and a couple who have left for pastures new but come back as its usually a good crack.

Wigston are the only band I know that go out on Boxing day. There are a couple of band locally that used to go out on Christmas Morning - Kibworth and Enderby, but I don't know if they were out this year. Does anyone else do "traditional" carolling jobs on Christmas Day?

As I have said before IMO carolling can be very enjoyable or boringly tedious - depending on where your carolling and who you are doing it with I guess.

As for someone who suggested it was good for the lip - I find the opposite. I'm usually playing top cornet for carols, switching back to flugel for our concerts, which means my stamina isn't great. Basically for carolling jobs I play for a couple of hours until I can barely produce a note anymore - which is pretty terrible practice. I'm sure Usain Bolt doesn't train by runing until he can't stand anymore!
 

Aussie Tuba

Member
Sticking to your normal instrument carolling can be good for your lip by the end.
But Not if you change around. I know of euphonium players who have covered horn parts and suffered for it later.
I tend to stick to EEb. So it certainly helps my lip. Best practise I've had all year. stamina wise.
 
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