Where do Bass Trombonists come from?

If you are a Bass Trom player, did you...

  • Move to it after playing brass for less than a year

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Move to it after playing a lower instrument for more than a year

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Move to it after playing a higher instrument for more than a year

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Move to it after playing Euph/Bari for more than a year

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    48

MoominDave

Well-Known Member
I have a hypothesis that nobody who 'ends up' on Bass Trom began their brass career there - it's such a specialist position in the band that no one is put on it immediately they start. The fact that it's too big to hold and beefy to blow for children to play it probably doesn't help either. Actually, I'll extend that and suggest that Bass Trom players probably played another brass instrument for a substantial period of time.

Me, I started brass playing on Euphonium at age 8 before adding Bass Trom as a handy combined way of learning bass clef brass reading and slide positions when I was 13 or so. Anyone care to contradict my theory?

Dave
 

iancwilx

Well-Known Member
My old mate Ian Copland was Bass Trom for Dyke and JSVB for years and I know he played a couple of other instruments for a very short time before taking it on, but once he tried it, he knew it was for him - he bonded with it instantly !!
I must admit, having known quite a few BT's I do think they tend to be a bit eccentric, you know, like Sop players (Or are they just plain crazy ??)
At Kippax we are about to lose a great Bass Trom to University, so if any competent exponent of the "Slush Pump" in the Leeds area is interested, just log on to www.kippaxband.com.uk
 

markyboy

Member
Probably the funniest profile on our website features our Bass trom player Richard 'Billy' Brook. It hits the nail on the head regards 95 % of this particular bunch of players.(I'm loathed to refer to them as musicians!)
Have a look on www.penninebrass.co.uk

Sorry I'm not au fait enough to create a direct link to this profile.
 

Fishsta

Active Member
Another suggestion is that Bass Trombone players were taught as "C" Trombone players in Orchestras.

I know one in particular who came along to Standish Band several years ago. He was a fantastic player, raised as an Orchestral Trombone player. He was put on 2nd Trombone (next to me, back in my Trombone days!), and admitted that he couldn't read Treble Clef, all his parts had been written in Bass Clef.

He played by transposing on the fly to Bass Clef in C!

Unfortunately, his job took him away from the band (he was a vicar) when they transferred him to another parish somewhere.

What a character he was too!

Don't suppose anyone has a Trombone player called Robert Thompson ("with a p", as he used to say!) that came from the Wigan area?

It'd be nice to get back in touch with him.
 

Mr Smiler

Member
Despot said:
markyboy said:
Probably the funniest profile on our website features our Bass trom player Richard 'Billy' Brook. .
Very good! :lol:
That's one of the funniest profiles I've ever seen (and surely sums up the archetypal bass trombonist?!) :wink:
 
I only play the instrument - I consider myself as a tenor trombone player who happens to play bass trombone some of the time (when the money's right :wink: )
 

blondie

Member
I would consider myself to be a 'dabbler' in the realm of the BT. I started on Tenor and got moved on to BT. Back on to Tenor where I spent most of my life and then back to it for the longest yet of 3 years.

But I do enjoy it now and tend to sound more like a BT more of the time. It is a different style of playing!!! I would like to go back to Tenor at some point though.

Now you can start all the witisisms! :wink:
 

JessopSmythe

Active Member
I'm a displaced Euph player. After 10 years on Euph/Bari I wanted to join an army band. In the interviews I discovered that the majority of military Euph music is in bass clef. So I bought a cheap trombone, went round to my local village band and sat in, teaching myself both trombone and bass clef as I went. After a while I found myself doing less euph and more trombone until I reached the point where I now consider BT as my main instrument
 

BoozyBTrom

Member
I started in a wind band reading the 3rd (Bass) Trom parts in Bass Clef.

When i was asked to join the local brass band the only parts in bass clef were Bass TRom so thats where i sat.
 

Curious

Member
Obviously they are quarried!!

I've dabbled but still have no idea how they constantly make that sound and more!!!
 

bagpuss

Active Member
All Bass Trombone players come from a planet far, far away. A planet where everyone plays too loudly, out of tune and rarely in time with anyone else. It is for this reason that they blend in so well there. Only after a considerable amount of time (usually towards adulthood) are they finally discovered to be Bass Trombonists and exiled from their home planet and sent to Earth. Once here they lay low for a little while so that they can find an unsuspecting group of musicians, once they find a group, they pounce. They infiltrate the group with talk of being able to drink loads of beer and relating anecdotes of the wonderful things they achieved with other bands they played for in the past (this is usually lies, not in all cases however). Once 'integrated' with the band they are then free to continue with their loud, raucous, out of tune playing until once again they are discovered to be Bass Trombonists. It is at this point that a now mature (??????) Bass Trombonist will throw his/her teddies out of the pram and either leave or sulk. This is common amongst Bass trombone players and is not to be feared. After all, new bass trombonists are being exiled all the time from their home planet so it will only be a matter of time before another infiltrates the happy group of musicians. Unfortunately, if another bass trombone player attempts to infiltrate a band that already has one, the bass trombonist in residence will go through a miraculous change almost immediately. Hackles will rise, eyes will turn green and in almost all cases (regardless of the sex of the player) a handbag will appear. The player in residence will use all his/her powers of persuasion over the other members of the band to ensure that the new player does not integrate. He/she will ensure that everyone knows that the newcomer is a worse player/killjoy/poor drinker/quieter player/less tuneful player than the player in residence whilst maintaining a happy demeanour to the newcomer. This ensures the newcomer feels happy and accepted and is completely unaware of the hatchet job being done on him/her by a fellow player. Unfortunately for the newcomer, the player in residence almost always wins this very one sided battle and the newcomer is cast aside or given a baritone. On the very rare occassion that the player in residence loses this battle, the defence mechanism of throwing teddies out of the pram/sulking (as detailed above) is used to save face.
The sexual habits of the bass trombonist can only be guessed at as there has never been a reliable confirmation of this ever having happened. However, from the rumours on the subject, it is not the sort of thing that can can be discussed on a family forum.
The eating habits of the bass trombonist on the other hand are very well documented. Their diet consists mainly of kebabs, chips, burgers, pies, pizzas, cakes, beer and in some cases all of the above at the same time. Their eating habits generally follow the rule 'lots and often' and once again are usually too disgusting to be detailed here.

I hope this has provided a useful insight into the life of the bass trombonist (latin name: loudness tuneless) and helps any band to recognise one of these alien creatures before they infiltrate your band and become integrated.

:D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D

Mr B. Puss esq
 

bagpuss

Active Member
All Bass Trombone players come from a planet far, far away. A planet where everyone plays too loudly, out of tune and rarely in time with anyone else. It is for this reason that they blend in so well there. Only after a considerable amount of time (usually towards adulthood) are they finally discovered to be Bass Trombonists and exiled from their home planet and sent to Earth. Once here they lay low for a little while so that they can find an unsuspecting group of musicians, once they find a group, they pounce. They infiltrate the group with talk of being able to drink loads of beer and relating anecdotes of the wonderful things they achieved with other bands they played for in the past (this is usually lies, not in all cases however). Once 'integrated' with the band they are then free to continue with their loud, raucous, out of tune playing until once again they are discovered to be Bass Trombonists. It is at this point that a now mature (??????) Bass Trombonist will throw his/her teddies out of the pram and either leave or sulk. This is common amongst Bass trombone players and is not to be feared. After all, new bass trombonists are being exiled all the time from their home planet so it will only be a matter of time before another infiltrates the happy group of musicians. Unfortunately, if another bass trombone player attempts to infiltrate a band that already has one, the bass trombonist in residence will go through a miraculous change almost immediately. Hackles will rise, eyes will turn green and in almost all cases (regardless of the sex of the player) a handbag will appear. The player in residence will use all his/her powers of persuasion over the other members of the band to ensure that the new player does not integrate. He/she will ensure that everyone knows that the newcomer is a worse player/killjoy/poor drinker/quieter player/less tuneful player than the player in residence whilst maintaining a happy demeanour to the newcomer. This ensures the newcomer feels happy and accepted and is completely unaware of the hatchet job being done on him/her by a fellow player. Unfortunately for the newcomer, the player in residence almost always wins this very one sided battle and the newcomer is cast aside or given a baritone. On the very rare occassion that the player in residence loses this battle, the defence mechanism of throwing teddies out of the pram/sulking (as detailed above) is used to save face.
The sexual habits of the bass trombonist can only be guessed at as there has never been a reliable confirmation of this ever having happened. However, from the rumours on the subject, it is not the sort of thing that can can be discussed on a family forum.
The eating habits of the bass trombonist on the other hand are very well documented. Their diet consists mainly of kebabs, chips, burgers, pies, pizzas, cakes, beer and in some cases all of the above at the same time. Their eating habits generally follow the rule 'lots and often' and once again are usually too disgusting to be detailed here.

I hope this has provided a useful insight into the life of the bass trombonist (latin name: loudness tuneless) and helps any band to recognise one of these alien creatures before they infiltrate your band and become integrated.

:D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D

Mr B. Puss es
 

MoominDave

Well-Known Member
C'est fantastique, Monsieur Bagpuss!

It looks like my idea was sort of right, but not really. About par for ideas, then... I wonder if it was different in the days of G Trombones. The handle does mean that the far positions aren't too tricky to reach though.

Intriguing that not many people are willing to put their hands up and say an unqualified "I am primarily a Bass Trombonist in the band" though (including me). One might almost imagine that playing the beast generates some sort of complex... :shock:

Dave
 

JessopSmythe

Active Member
M. Le Chat, coming from an ex trombonist who's been pushed out to percussion, you comments can only bring to mind 3 words






Pot, Kettle, Black!
 

JessopSmythe

Active Member
Dave, there's no complex here. I grew up as a euph/bari player. Then I saw the light. "Enough of these valve thingies, I want to be a musician". Although I can still play a euph (or any other valved instrument) I'm proud to call myself a Bass Trombonist and now consider it to be my primary instrument.
 
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