What’s your favourite instrument and why?

Queeg2000

Active Member
Most people will say their favourite is whatever they play. To bend this rule a little I'm going to say the flugelhorn, though I played it in my teens, I now play cornet but still consider myself a flugel player who happens to play cornet. Love the parts and the sound from the flugelhorn.
 

paul hardwick

New Member
Mine has to be my Bah Strad 37, it plays beautifully, i have owned it just over a week and i have played it a lot and the valves are as quick as when i got it, no lubricant used, wonderful instrument.
Paul
 

*me*

New Member
Personally I play tenor horn which I do enjoy but my first love will always be Baritone. I think a well played Baritone can be stunning
 

2nd tenor

Well-Known Member
For me it has got to be Euph, just something about it.
I think that the Tenor Tuba or Euphonium certainly does have something about it that really appeals. Others in the Tuba family overlap and can deliver too as the late great JF demonstrates here with a nice bit of Bach:

For what it’s worth, whilst the piece sounds both beautiful and easy it’s only beautiful and John’s mastery makes it sound easy - amongst other things he was the Principal Tuba in the LSO.

If something more ‘Brass Bandy’ is needed to make the point (overlap in sound in the Tuba family) then John does it here with the traditional Euphonium solo Czardas:
 
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Jack E

Well-Known Member
Mine has to be my Bah Strad 37, it plays beautifully, i have owned it just over a week and i have played it a lot and the valves are as quick as when i got it, no lubricant used, wonderful instrument.
Paul
I have heard of people never using lubricant on their valves, but I must say that the thought of relying on a combination of water and spit to lubricate metal and to protect it from corrosion gives me the heebie-jeebies. Believe it or not, the reason stainless steel is so little used in marine engineering is because, unless it has very free access to oxgen, it can and will rust faster than mild steel. The reason SS sinks and saucepans last for years without corroding is because the metal reacts with atmospheric oxygen to form a stable, microscopically-thin protective coating of oxide - the whole process only taking seconds. But if SS does NOT have access to plenty of free oxygen to form that protective coating, it will corrode like the clappers.
 

MissBraz

Active Member
I think that the Tenor Tuba or Euphonium certainly does have something about it that really appeals. Others in the Tuba family overlap and can deliver too as the late great JF demonstrates here with a nice bit of Bach:
I don't play euph so its not biased, to be honest I think each instrument has its individual qualities - but definitely comes down to how a player plays.
 

2nd tenor

Well-Known Member
I don't play euph so its not biased, to be honest I think each instrument has its individual qualities - but definitely comes down to how a player plays.
Agreed. ( Edit. One point though. The player has got to be allowed to play and in the Brass Band setting the Bass Tuba is rarely allowed to play what it is capable of and it is overshadowed by its ‘little brother’, of course it typically doesn’t have a player who can go ‘toe to toe’ on ability with the Band’s Tenor Tuba/Euphonium players either - JF was very much the exception.)

When I started the thread I had make and model (say twenty year old Yamaha YSL354 Trombone) more in mind than type of instrument (say Soprano Cornet). Interesting how it’s turned out though.
 
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Basstiger

Member
I agree with you 2T, but then once a trombone player always a trombone player. There is nothing quite like a trio of trombones playing together in harmony.
As for my favourite? Quite possibly the Yamaha 613H bass trombone I have now. I’ve had many instruments over the years, both tenor and bass but I think this one is the best. Run a close second by the Yamaha 682B “Bousfield” Bb/F tenor I had the pleasure of owning once. I did have a preference for American trombones for a while but now am of the opinion there’s not much better than a Yamaha of a certain age. (That said I haven’t tried any of the newer models so can’t really compare them)
 

2nd tenor

Well-Known Member
I agree with you 2T, but then once a trombone player always a trombone player. There is nothing quite like a trio of trombones playing together in harmony.
Yep, a trio of Trombones can produce a wonderful sound. As a stand alone group I think that four Trombones works really well and really like what the group Bones Apart do - though membership of that group has altered over the years all the members are, I think, top class players.
www.bonesapart.com . Here are two contrasting videos of them.


 
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2nd tenor

Well-Known Member
Wow @Basstiger, some rocking pieces there and from folk that were new to me.

Christoper Bill does some incredible four tracks, here’s one:


And for those that don’t realise that Trombones can do it all here’s a nice bit of Purcell with ‘Trombones’ little and large.


Did someone say ‘once a Trombone player always a Trombone player’ ......? There is nothing quite like a three or four trombones playing together in harmony, and whilst it’s a perfectly good solo instrument that team work just gives it just that ‘something else’. Perhaps it’s something to do with synergy.

I fear that this thread has drifted, oh dear, that sometimes happens. Back to the original post now I suppose.
 
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John Brooks

Well-Known Member
I'm not, never have been and never will be a trombone player but one of my musical memories is hearing the International Staff Band trombone section play The Swan from Carnival of the Animals in unison, it was simply amazing. At the time, that section included Arthur Rolls and Cyril Brisley so I'm talking the late 60's. Not exactly on topic but the recent trombone posts brought it to mind.

My favourite instrument to listen to is the soprano, notably Brian Evans but also Gary Fountain. Although I spent some time on BBb Bass and Baritone, my favourite instrument to play was Bb cornet.
 
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