we will remember them

BoBo

Member
It has always occurred on the 11th, whichever day of the week that happens to fall on, so no change has occurred. The majority are only aware of the sunday events in general because they are more local and widespread, but in recent years awareness has risen because I suppose we have been involved in more wars, and there has been a campaign to raise the profile.

So companies, schools etc. have started to recognise the significance of the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month which marked the end of the 1st world war. That is where the change has been.
 

Bariman

Member
Brian Bowen said:
For how long has Remembrance Day been acknowledged in the UK with 2 minute's silence, etc, on 11 November rather than the nearest Sunday (as when I lived in England)? Is the service at the Cenotaph in Whitehall still on the Sunday? This is the first year I've been aware of any change.

In the USA, 11 November is celebrated as Veterans Day and is a national holiday for many, e.g., government workers.

It's only a recent innovation but one that has caught on.

Sunday is still important - The Centoaph service is still on Sunday. There will be lots of bands out taking in part in commeration events throughout the country - Chelmsford SA will be taking part in the town playing the national anthem and leading the hymn singing.
 

Jan H

Moderator
Staff member
In Belgium, the 11th of November (Armistice Day) is a national holiday for everyone. In all villages, flowers are laid on or near the Memorial Monuments. to remember the victims of both World Wars and other military conflicts since then. In most places (like in my village), these ceremonies are accompanied by the town band, playing at least our National Anthem. The biggest ceremonies are in Brussels, were king Albert takes the honours at the national monument for the unknown soldier, and in Ypres at the Menin gate, were volunteers have been playing The Last Post every day since the monument was erected in the 1920's.

What's so special about the memorial in my vilage, is the fact that my band allways combines it with our annual "village pub tour", during which we pay a visit to all 8 pubs in our town. Purely as a remembrance for our town's war victims of course ;)
 
jan_h said:
in Ypres at the Menin gate, were volunteers have been playing The Last Post every day since the minument was erected in the 1920's.

Apparently this is the first year where there will be no British veterans at the Menin Gate service as those who are still alive are too old and frail to make the journey. The end of an era.
 

Jan H

Moderator
Staff member
Paul McLaughlin said:
Apparently this is the first year where there will be no British veterans at the Menin Gate service as those who are still alive are too old and frail to make the journey. The end of an era.
Indeed, I saw that on the television too. Also our last Belgian WW1 veteran died last year in his home in Detroit (he moved there after the War)...
 

bigmamabadger

Active Member
We did the Burma Star Association parade in August which also made me very sad. It was for the whole of the North-West, and they all fitted into one small parish church in Northwich. I imagine at the beginning they would have filled a cathedral.

On a slightly different note, with the possible exception of "Do not stand at my grave and weep" I don't feel there has been any English war poetry to touch that produced during WWI. I wonder why?
BMB
xx
 

Maestro

Active Member
bigmamabadger said:
On a slightly different note, with the possible exception of "Do not stand at my grave and weep" I don't feel there has been any English war poetry to touch that produced during WWI. I wonder why?
BMB
xx

I was under the impression that this was written around 1932 and wasn't originally written as a 'war poem', but has been 'adopted' as one.

I could be wrong, it wouldn't be the first time. :oops: :oops:
 

akwarose

Active Member
We had a minutes silence at school and we were shown a presentation, it was slides showing pictures from WW1 and 2. I was deeply moved by some of the pictures, and at the tragic loss of so many lives. I was really quite upset when i looked around the gallery, and saw people still laughing and chatting with their friends. I was one of the few that were wearing poppies that day.
I can honestly say it was a very moving and poignant reminder of what had happened, and I'm shocked that few of my generation seem to know or care. I hope to God no one ever forgets what happened in order for us to have the lives we have today.


We will remember them.
 

Will the Sec

Active Member
Brian Bowen said:
For how long has Remembrance Day been acknowledged in the UK with 2 minute's silence, etc, on 11 November rather than the nearest Sunday (as when I lived in England)? Is the service at the Cenotaph in Whitehall still on the Sunday? This is the first year I've been aware of any change..
It's been in for several years - as I recall the Royal British Legion made the request for two minutes on the 11th every year, and the Government set the lead by announcing it would request a two minute silence in Civil Service offices. Buses and coaches were asked to stop if it was safe, ditto trains.



Might have been Millennium year?



I seem to remember looking out of a window from the 12th floor at South Quay and thinking how good it was that the traffic crossing the bascule bridge was stationary by choice.
 

flugelgal

Active Member
It's interesting to know that I work for Local Government and (as can be seen by my earlier post) hardly anyone in the office observed a silence. :-?
 

WoodenFlugel

Moderator
Staff member
Well I work in a very busy office (despite what some of my MSN mates might think!!!) and it was very poingnant that the whole factory stopped for 2 minutes on Thursday - as has happened every year since I've been there. It is so important that we stop and think, even if it is just for two minutes every year.


We will remember them....
 

bigmamabadger

Active Member
Maestro said:
I was under the impression that this was written around 1932 and wasn't originally written as a 'war poem', but has been 'adopted' as one.

I could be wrong, it wouldn't be the first time. :oops: :oops:

You're absolutely right, it was written by Mary Frye in 1932 (I just Googled it...)
Someone once told me it was written by a soldier serving in NI. Maybe I'm thinking of some other poem entirely?
BMB
xx
 

drummergurl

Active Member
im currently watchin the british legion remembrance festival on bbc1 n have been all night... but its really really moving me... im almost crying...


WE WILL REMEMBER THEM




ok now im crying
 

The Cornet King

Active Member
Some 60 million people died in wars in the 20th Century, roughly the population of Great Britain. A phenomenal loss of life.

But its important we remember everyone who has died, fighting for their respective countries, victors or defeated, for there sacrifices to the cause(s). Its important to remember that those fighting for Germany and the axis powers in the Second World war were ordinary folk, who were fighting not out of choice but for a totalitarian and dictatorial regime.

The wars in Indochina (1946-1973) were fought because of colonialism.
Notice the pattern of politics?

'War is a continuation of politics by other means' said by Von Clauswitz. Sadly how true this statement is...and it certainly rings true today in Iraq.

We shall remember them.
 

Red Elvis

Active Member
bigmamabadger said:
You're absolutely right, it was written by Mary Frye in 1932 (I just Googled it...)
Someone once told me it was written by a soldier serving in NI. Maybe I'm thinking of some other poem entirely?
BMB
xx

"Do not stand at my grave and weep ,I am not there , I do not sleep...."

Thought it was W.H.Auden but am willing to be corrected.

Fortunate that living in middle of London I can walk down to the cenotaph tomorrow morning.Always find it very poignant when the Guards bands strike up with "Isle of Beauty" and then all the other remembrance day music.

I have big problems with our role in Iraq but I respect the men and women that are out there.

Just hope Blair can sleep well at night.
 

dyl

Active Member
Just got back from the remembrance service at our village this morning - a good turnout but not as much as last year - which in turn, wasn't as much as the year before. (I'm not talking about the band here - but villagers!). Sadly, a sign of the times in which we live in.

One of the veterans, Bill Evans, came up to me to thank me for turning up - it means so much to them - but it should be the other way 'round - we have so much to be greatful to them for - a simple 'It's the least we can do' doesn't suffice.

Talking to Bill I sensed some bitterness in his voice at the way they've been treated by the MOD recently. He proudly showed me the medal he received - from the French - in Normandy in June to mark the 60th Annniversary of the D-Day landings - a beautiful, shiny, medal, fitting of the occasion. 'The MOD have now finally, 6 months after, decided to give us a BADGE' he said. Says it all really....................

Thanks Bill, and all your comrades. WWRT.
 

Maestro

Active Member
bigmamabadger said:
You're absolutely right, it was written by Mary Frye in 1932 (I just Googled it...)
Someone once told me it was written by a soldier serving in NI. Maybe I'm thinking of some other poem entirely?
BMB
xx

The reason for this is, because a young soldier was killed in NI, and this poem was found on his body, handwritten.
 

satchmo shaz

Active Member
just back from our parade in Spondon, always a good turn out from the band and also the locals!


I also played last post on Thursday at a local service for former co op employees lost in WW1 and there was an amazing turnout!
 

Hollie

Member
At school on thursday the fire alarm was set off so we could not holds our minute's silence at 11. We done it at 11:05 and then our teacher read us a war poem.
Marched today, I always feel honoured to do things like that, I can't explain it well but I hope some of you out there feel this too.
 
Maestro said:
The reason for this is, because a young soldier was killed in NI, and this poem was found on his body, handwritten.

True. It was found in an envelope in his uniform made out to his parents "in the event of my death" I thought that the author of this was unknown. I've heard many theories, inlcluding it being am american indian poem. It came out top of the poll the bbc did a few years ago to find the nation's favourite poem. Makes me cry every time!
 

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