Tone

mad_female

Member
Keppler said

or failing the availability of a small teddy-bear, try LittleBabyBadger

OI :!: Having met little baby badger on several occasions I have to say that is not a nice thing to say :p Little baby badger is cute and frightened of Bagpuss and her evil uncle Jessop-Smythe so she needs a teddy to cuddle not to be used as one.

Rhian :D

Mad_female
 

McEuphie

Member
Good morning BMB

What mouthpiece are you using - go for a DW 2 - biggest available for horn.

I used to play with a duster stuck down my bell but much easier with a mute.
I got my practice mute through Dawsons in Chester (they also have a shop in Warrington - with web site and on-line ordering) could try Band Supplies of Leeds as well. I would go for a Dennis Wick for your Sov Horn but you can also get Yamaha Silent Brass (can't comment in these).

A DW straight bass trom mute will fit your horn but will not "muffle" the sound as much as a practice mute or produce the back pressure which allows the sound to flow easier when playing w/out a mute.

Practice in a comfy range first eg bC-E on long notes then go up and down - quiet and loud, also get hold of a solo cornet copy of the red hymn book and work through the book.

We can chat at band next week.

Have a good day!
 

neiltwist

Active Member
McEuphie said:
I got my practice mute through Dawsons in Chester (they also have a shop in Warrington - with web site and on-line ordering) could try Band Supplies of Leeds as well. I would go for a Dennis Wick for your Sov Horn but you can also get Yamaha Silent Brass (can't comment in these)....

dawsons are all over the place, there's even one in st helens! and a massive one in manchester. I'd get one online though as I ended up in preston for mine (years ago when on cornet).

McEuphie said:
... get hold of a solo cornet copy of the red hymn book and work through the book.

yeah, it's slightly more interesting than the bass trom book, can't speak fir the horn book thiugh...
 

geordiecolin

Active Member
When my dad used to play Tenoer Horn he used to use his home-made french horn mute in his tenor horn.

Its a good job wonky didn't catch him at it eh?! :lol:
 
i found my practice mute very useful for improving tone (although the origional intention was just to not annoy my housemates).

however i also found that it adversly affected my tuning, went quite sharp for a time.
 

Well Worth It

Active Member
Whilst I'm sure you're aware that using ANY mute affects tuning, be mindful of pitching your notes too low to compensate. Play through the mute, not into it.
 

ScrapingtheBottom

Active Member
Well Worth It said:
Whilst I'm sure you're aware that using ANY mute affects tuning, be mindful of pitching your notes too low to compensate. Play through the mute, not into it.

Well said that man. I would also like to add that IMHO this problem is really bad on Denis Wick adjustible cup mutes (ie my practice mute). Also as a mute creates increased resistance you shouldn't allow your breathing to become slack or else your work will be for nothing.
 

bigmamabadger

Active Member
Keppler said:
I'm sure if you have a few hundred quid to blow you'll be more than willing to buy several to find the best fit..
;)

Yeahh...... always got a few tons spare, me.
LBB wriggled out again so it'll have to be the practice mute I guess.
I'll show you the results of your wonderful advice at the next tMP band thing.
Thanks,
BMB
xx
 

Vickitorious

Active Member
Try playing long notes, throughout the whole of the range, but play them as quiet as you can, and then when you go back to playing a comfortable mf, your sound will probably sound a bit richer. It worked for me :D :wink:
 

kate_the_horn

New Member
yo bmb
on the very often occasion wen the othre 2 horn players are late/missing in action ive heard ure tone, your doin good, yeh!!

idea for ya, i know ure on perc at the mo, but make sure u make u the missed horn playing sum othre way (join another band?) i know of one on a friday night............

no, seriously, tell steve u wanna improve, he might give ya a solo, or sort out the horn section!

i did see a flying pig once!

KEK
 

amgray

Member
ScrapingtheBottom said:
... as a mute creates increased resistance you shouldn't allow your breathing to become slack or else your work will be for nothing...
True, my suggestion would be when using a practice mute to not use the tongue at all, lets REALLY see if the breathing is operating as it should. :twisted: :twisted:

WORK that diaphragm :shock:
 

Tobin

Member
Quiet long notes are the key to all this. Don't have to be high notes, porbably start on a bottom C and work down. Play each one for 1 minute (or build up to it), and so quiet you can barely hear it - this is obviously extremely difficult - takes super control - but if done properly it opens up everything - the sound will become much clearer and your control will be much better. Patience is the key here. Almost every top player i've heard of spends lots of time doing this.

I heard marsalis do this - he gives the same advice to every youngster.
 

Dave Euph

Member
Keppler said:
Work with a practice mute / cloth in the bell
Concentrate on width of sound (think wide!) A sound doesn't have to be loud to project - think of pushing the airflow all the way past the bell, as if you were blowing up a balloon attached to the end of your instrument..

Range will come back, but IMHO it should be built on top of a secure wode tone.

(Kepps Body Stretching Method)
;)

Best of luck

Total agreement, I recently changed my mouthpiece to improve my tone, but my upper-register just dropped out. I've had to do a lot of work recently to retify that, but it pays off when you can play upper notes with a beautiful tone.
 

skweeky

Member
i have heard somewhere that bending notes or very wide, slow, exaggerated vibrato somehow improves tone but dont know exactly what the practise is. Maybe some kind musician will read this and fill us in with the details, if in fact this note bending is true.

also a practise mut is always the key, if you have a black DW one then try covering some of the holes with tape so you have to use your diaphram more and play quietly through the hole register. When you take it out even after 5 minutes, your tone should be quite "fuller" than usual.
 

Dave Euph

Member
skweeky said:
i have heard somewhere that bending notes or very wide, slow, exaggerated vibrato somehow improves tone but dont know exactly what the practise is. Maybe some kind musician will read this and fill us in with the details, if in fact this note bending is true.

also a practise mut is always the key, if you have a black DW one then try covering some of the holes with tape so you have to use your diaphram more and play quietly through the hole register. When you take it out even after 5 minutes, your tone should be quite "fuller" than usual.

I think the bending notes and slow exaggerated vibrato works because it forces you to open your embrochure, automatically pushing air from a larger opening and producing a fuller sound.

The mute idea is good as well, I usually get a standard straight mute, put it in with a duster and play as loud as possible down the instrument. It makes the sound amazing when you remove it because it "opens your lungs" meaning your use of air is far greater.
 

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