Those special words and phrases....

Maestro

Active Member
You want to try and get to grips with proper Norfolkese, but being mainly furriners you wouldn't have much of a hope. Even I struggle when I go abck home and start having a mardle with the old fishermen.

Dew yer lissun hare boy!!



ps. Carrrrrrrrmmmmmmmmmmmmeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee on yew yelleeeeeeeeeeeeerrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss!!!!!!!
 

groovy

Active Member
I'm Scottish, so I'm sure there are plenty of words that floral dance, myself etc. will use that will bamboozle you all!

I met some Welsh people this summer, and the one word I can remember them finding really strange was a burn (a small stream).

My favourite word in the English language is 'discombobulated' - a state of confusion. :D :lol:
 

BigHorn

Active Member
sudcornet said:
"Bah, it's nithery. Cummin' a pezzler dan't gill. Wu might as weal swale't barfen ower't gallower stonnin'n gan'n mizzel yam"

A pint of cyber-yal to whoever comes up with an accurate translation. (Or a real one if you catch up with me)
Sud
Im always up for a challenge. I reckon its

"The bar is wobbly. Im coming over perculiar and dare not breathe. You might as well swallow it and be sick over the girl who's standing on grandads miserable sweet potatoes. "
 

EIBB_Ray

Member
Straightmute said:
Fishsta said:
One of the worst errors to make is telling an American that you like hanging around with your mates. They will be shocked to hear that you have more than one mate, and that you hang around with them together and at the same time...

Particularly if you're enjoying a quick fag.

D

fortunately a few of us Americans are a bit more clued in than others, those of us who grew up on Monty Python and the Goodies and hang around websites predominantly frequented by Brits. Yes, we even know about windscreens, boots, lorries, lifts, bodgers and bobbies. But then again there are so many regional difference within the US, we scratch our heads at each other sometimes. I try not to ask you all (no, not y'all, I'm from the north) for clarification too often. I figure if I read enough, I'll catch on eventually.

Here's a little quiz on some american peculiarities:

What's the plural of "y'all?" (south, mostly Texas)
What's a "bubbler?" (exclusively Milwaukee)
What does one use to push around the store and gather groceries in? (mostly the south, Georgia, Mississippi et al.)

and for general comment:

What do you call the piece of furniture in the living room/ A sofa? Davenport? Couch?

What do you call carbonated soft drinks? Soda? Pop? Soda Pop? Coke? Sodie?

I love this stuff! Hey can anyone tell me, On the British Show (and yes I know it's not currently running, we get it here on public TV now) "Keeping Up Appearances," Onlsow wears a cap with "FH" on the front. I assume it's a sports team hat, who is it? It's always driven me nuts.
 

Trom41821

Member
Those special words and phrases

Living with an ex South African I have learnt several words which are a mix of Afrikaans or Zulu.

Padcos = packed lunch
Mutti = medicine
Nunu = any unwanted flying insect
Helt (spelt phonetically) = money

Then there's always moither instead of mither in Shropshire, mommy coddle instead of molly coddle, and several other strange dunnerer, wunnerer's that super_sop may have come across :!:
 

dyl

Active Member
groovy said:
I met some Welsh people this summer, and the one word I can remember them finding really strange was a burn (a small stream).
Are you sure about that? :? :shock: :roll: Never heard of it myself, and I've been speaking Welsh all my life! Well, most of my life anyway - had to wait a few years to get started properly! ;)
 

The Cornet King

Active Member
Appen i could teach you some Yorkshire lark sometime guys.
Can't believe when Southerners come up to these parts they can't understand what we say???
Aye, they speak weird down there...not proper English like good ol' Yorkshire! :wink: :D
 

PeterBale

Moderator
Staff member
EIBB_Ray said:
What do you call the piece of furniture in the living room/ A sofa? Davenport? Couch?

How about a settee?

EIBB_Ray said:
What do you call carbonated soft drinks? Soda? Pop? Soda Pop? Coke? Sodie?

Pop or fizz

Talking about different UK accents, when I did my basic training in the forces, I had a Devonian in one corner of the room and a Geordie in the bed opposite. Regional accents were heard much less frequently in the media then (1973) and they had a terrible job understanding each other.
 

Trom41821

Member
Those Special Words and Phrases

What about pumps, daps, plimsolls, tacki's, tennis shoe all meaning what we now know as trainers :roll:
 

stephen2001

Member
Being at University, there are a whole wide range of dielects in use throughout the concert band!
After 2 and a bit years I've just about got used to it!
 
"It's all gravy baby" - in scouse means that everything's fine!!!

"There were pure people there" - in scouse means there were lots, pure = lots!
 

groovy

Active Member
dyl said:
groovy said:
I met some Welsh people this summer, and the one word I can remember them finding really strange was a burn (a small stream).
Are you sure about that? :? :shock: :roll: Never heard of it myself, and I've been speaking Welsh all my life! Well, most of my life anyway - had to wait a few years to get started properly! ;)

I think I've confuzzled you a bit! A burn is a Scottish thing - and it was the Welsh that were a bit lost when I mentioned it. :) :wink:
 
Here's some typical Scouse phrases

'people knocking about' means people people hanging round

'jam-packed full' means full.

'lets sit off' means lets go in someone's house.

a 'chong' is a cigarette.

and erm, a 'wheelbarrow' is a homosexual person... *family site - sorry*

"yah mate" is yes ok

an people always seem to say "too right" to agree with people :?
 

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