The Beauty of Pedal Notes.

Highams

Member
Most low brass tbn/euph/tuba players accept pedal notes as part of their compass and daily routine.

Pedal notes are excellent practice for ALL instruments, even cornets !

Recently a trumpeter friend of mine was asking about mouthpieces to try to get a better sound.

I managed to convince him to wait and play one page a day of 120 Hymns for Brass Band, starting on pedal notes where possible, for a week.
He was capable of a good pedal C but not much more.

Within days he good go down to G & F with clarity and his control and sound had changed considerably as well.

Pedals are produced with the least resistance and take lots of air.

Copy this into your upper register and the improvement can really be heard.

I have heard the great Herbert L Clarke recordings and his pedal notes are unbeleivable !

Don't leave it to the tubas !

Charley.
www.euph9.freeserve.co.uk
 

Aidan

Active Member
agreed...
pedal notes and false harmonics are the way forward.
help tone quality, production, support, and general note security.
Make brilliant practice, you notice huge benefits.
 

McEuphie

Member
The pedals have always been a favourite of mine since playing horn - I started with a french horn Otto Langey tutor - once I'd figured out what all the little lines meant and converted the bass clef I was sorted.

One thing that frustrated me on the horn was not being able to play the notes in between bottom G and ped C - so glad when I moved to Euph and got a fourth valve. Now if you can get 4th valves on baritones and even flugals can someone not fit one to a horn!

Anyway, another benefit I find from playing pedals is as a "warm-down" -after a hard practices fairly relaxes the the old lips.

Enjoying the site.

Keep up the good work.
 

neiltwist

Active Member
I definitely agree, or bending notes, like going down in semi-tones from bottom g on first and third, all the way to pedal c. when you can do that you should have an excellent sound regardless of instrument
 

Mrs Fruity

Member
Pedals

I agree - I wish that I could play pedals between bottom G and Pedal C - i tried my husband's "modified" (for this read HUGE) Vincent Bach 7 attached with gaffer tape ( I have a sad life and had nothing to do one Sunday morning (my neighbours love me!!!!@@@) - you'd be AMAZED what cracking pedals a tenor horn can play. I usually know if I'm well in practice if I can play a bottom F with F# fingering. (Doesn't happen often!)
 

Mrs Fruity

Member
Pedals

I agree - I wish that I could play pedals between bottom G and Pedal C - i tried my husband's "modified" (for this read HUGE) Vincent Bach 7 attached with gaffer tape ( I have a sad life and had nothing to do one Sunday morning (my neighbours love me!!!!@@@) - you'd be AMAZED what cracking pedals a tenor horn can play. I usually know if I'm well in practice if I can play a bottom F with F# fingering. (Doesn't happen often!)
 

PeterBale

Moderator
Staff member
Bass pedal notes can clearly add an additional depth and fullness to the sound of a band, but I do feel they can be abused if used too often, or inappropriately. If they are used indiscriminately then the impact tends to be lost - just as an organist would only use his 32 foot stop to give special effect at the right moment. As a BBb player myself, I must obviously own up to using ( and enjoying ) pedal notes fairly frequently, but I like to feel that I am fairly sensitive to what the composer/arranger requires. If, for example, on the final note of a piece the composer has not written a low note that would have been within the normal range of the instrument at the time of writing, then it is probably not right for the player to drop the octave, as he probably wants a lighter voicing in the chord.

The notes I do tend to make more use of are those between the bottom F# and pedal C, particularly when the written part would otherwise give an awkward octave jump up. Although the notes are available on a 3-valve instrument, and are sometimes found in earlier pieces, they are difficult to produce as part of a flowing line, and so tend to be reserved for final chords etc. It is good to see writers nowadays beginning to make more effective use of the bottom compass of the instrument, both in loud and (often even more effective) quiet writing. Long may it continue!
 

Pondasher

Member
The use of additional pedal notes, played selectively, can only add to an overall beadth of performance. If you listen to the Black Dyke recordings with Derek Jackson & Co. Ltd. of a few years ago, then I am sure that you will agree.

Good to see the contribution from Mrs Fruity as her BB flat playing husband has contributed more to the art of pedalling than Raleigh Bikes.

As he is such a shy gentleman I can only give a clue to his identity C*li* D*x*n. He played alongside Derek Jackson in Dyke.

KEITH@quinnk37.freeserve.co.uk
www.euph9.freeserve.co.uk/quinn.htm
 

Highams

Member
It's nice to see so many points raised on this topic. My original intentions were as a means of improving sound for 'all' instruments, which I really do believe works.

Now that the subject of pedal notes on basses ( I should have seen that coming ) has arrived I must say that I feel too much is used in today's bands.

It's certainly the case of less is more I believe, there is nothing more boring than continuous pedal lines in music that does not warrant it.

Take a look at the B flat bass part to Gilbert Vinter's Salute To youth as an example. Often on top of the stave, and above, which is a sound rarely heard today and it has an effect on the way the whole band sounds.

Another example are the old recordings of Foden's on LP records, a huge, massive sound, rarely written below bottom G in those days !

We all know the class bands can do it, it's knowing when and where I think.
 

Aussie Tuba

Member
We all know the class bands can do it, it's knowing when and where I think.[/quote]

Watch your conducters reaction in rehersal ! If he smiles it's a good spot for a Pedal , If the look on his face is enough to curl your toes Ya don't do that one again !!!
Works for me :roll:
 

neiltwist

Active Member
i've put a few peddles in (on bass trom) at the wrong place, or the wrong note first time through a few pieces when I was younger, but the basses usually got the blame! :D
 

Big Fella

Member
Pedalling on a BBb is an art form, that takes years to master, something very few have ever managed to do. The person that sits at the side of me at band, has recently discovered he can pedal, something to do with a new much bigger mouthpiece. The only problem is, he does not stop pedalling and the overall effect is lost in a jumble of not quite in tune noise and trying to breathe to often..

Anybody any idea on how to stop him, apart from punching him !!!!!
 

MoominDave

Well-Known Member
i've put a few peddles in (on bass trom) at the wrong place, or the wrong note first time through a few pieces when I was younger, but the basses usually got the blame!
A couple of years ago I was playing Euph for 'Resurgam', and at the end, slipped in a ppp 32' D (or is it 16'? The concert C at the bottom of the piano, anyway). I was rather chuffed that the conductor immediately complimented the double B player...

Dave
 

Aussie Tuba

Member
Big Fella said:
Anybody any idea on how to stop him, apart from punching him !!!!!
Yeah ! When he's not looking , Put a small ball of chewy in the hole at the bottom of the mouthpiece . It might not stop him permanantly but the result will get a laugh and maybe make him think !!!!!
 

the fish

Member
Pedal's are great to warm up on and broaden the tone and range. I'd never put one in band where it wasn't written of course.......... :dunno
 
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