Split reaction

Lothianh

Member
flugelgal said:
I have to confess to being one of those bad workmen that blames the tools and looks at the instrument, but only in rehearsals.

I frequently look at the instrument as well, although generally not in blame. It's usually more of a question, like "What am I doing wrong that made you make *that* noise??" :-D

-Lothian
 

EIBB_Ray

Member
no one has contributed the classic "fiddle with the valves as if they were stuck!"

Seriously, it's unprofessional to react at all on stage. We're performers, perform as thought nothing odd happened. Take a lesson from cats, with their "I meant to do that" attitude.
 

manx_yessir

Member
Tromgod said:
Old lesson that I learned from others.................if you split a note, tut then point to person next to you while shaking head if the conductor looks in your direction.

:twisted: :lol: :arrow:

That's what I do too (unless on stage of course) hehehehe :twisted: :twisted: :wink:
 
As a 1st Horn player there isn't much room for splitting notes but being so talented I do on occassion manage to find a way but I continue to play as if it hadn't even happened.

However if my husband sitting on sop (normally sort of opposite) fluffs it up - I tend to give him a bit of a disappointing/sad puppy dog eyes type of look. The aim is that it will encourage him to try harder next time around and then he gets a much better look - glint in the eye, wide beamed smile type of look.
 

cornetgirl

Active Member
I tend to give the bass trombonist a look of utter horror, along the lines of "Where did you produce that note from?!"

Didn't work in Tallis on Sunday when I lip trilled the top B tho... :oops:

Rach x
 

Big Twigge

Active Member
I make quite a few mistakes so I have to share the burden of blame to those next to me, if its run of the mill unspectacular split I let them take the blame, but if its a superstandoutishmistake and should be congratulated then it was me!
 

JessopSmythe

Active Member
A tip for you that I learnt from a Bass Trombonist many years ago.
If you're not sure how something goes, or theres a danger you might fluff/split it. Play loudly and confidently. That way everyone'll think that's how it's supposed to go anyway and check their own parts to see where they went wrong :D
 
Not that I would ever split a note, being a bass trombonist...

At rehearsals, if there is ever a sound that sounds like a split that might have come from me, I tend to look at the second trombonist as it is usually the higher stuff that might sound like a split!

Problem is that our contest second trombone it pretty darn good! I may have to start to look at some one else now.

On contest though, I try not to react (although I think that my left eyebrow twitches a bit) as the note is out and away: no point on dwelling on it and it affecting the rest of the performance.
 

jambo

Member
Split notes...how'd ya do that? :shock:

Seriously though I just pretend as though nothing has happened and should it have been a bad enough split to warrant notice from the band or conductor then i'm affraid the guy next to me gets the blame. Which results in lots of profanities from him as he protests innocence...works every time :wink:
 

deave

Member
When abliterating something..i normally get verbally abused from conductor before i get chance to abuse myself: A few favourites:

"Do you two have a brain cell between u?" (me and uni band top man)

"It's scary how thick you are, considering i teach you!" <---personal fave.

Yesterday's Uni band rehearsal, to my bro:
"You were the only one who bothered to come in, and that was pathetic!"

or the legendary

"JESUS WEPT!"

Ahh.....i love it i do!
 

WhatSharp?

Active Member
Depends on the split :

Total Miss (resulting in obscure sound ) : Front Row (and Me) collapse with laughter, band stops, condcutor (laughing) "what was that?"

Partial Miss : Explitive

Slight Miss : Eyebrows rasied keep going

Of course I try not to react on stage, I have been told that I do "wince" occasionally.

I do recall one occassion I would split on particular note with such regularity that the front row became conviced after a while that I had b****x written on my part.
 

Seedhouse

Active Member
What Sharp? said:
Total Miss (resulting in obscure sound ) : Front Row (and Me) collapse with laughter, band stops, condcutor (laughing) "what was that?"

Partial Miss : Explitive

Slight Miss : Eyebrows rasied keep going

Like the catergories! :lol: :wink:
 

DrCornet

New Member
Of course, it all depends on the type of split you produce as to what remedial action you should follow.

Here are a few of my favourites which although designed for the cornet player, should transpose effectively for the larger instruments.

The common split - The bandsman's favourite. Correctly executed, this should produce the familiar "Pee - yaaah" production.
You know you did it - the rest of the band know you did it.

The air note - Squeezing for a high note results in nothing more than a faint hiss. Extended use can build volume to nearly as load as the note you are aiming for.
For section playing this is the easiest to get away with - no harm done!

The stutter split - Where a note starts then almost immediately stops before getting going again. May be repeated as long as individual taste dictates.
Especially useful for quiet exposed solo passages in contests

The pitboot entry - Not strictly a split, but should be included here for artistic completeness. Pianissimo playing initiated by a diaphragm blast with a kick stronger than 4 pints of turbo shandy. Again, best saved up until that crucial contest performance.

Fish and chips - Again, technically not a split but worth pointing out.
Ideally included in a quietish solo passage, the tone should diminish until the unmistakeable sound of a deep fat fryer is projected. Effect may be augmented by avoiding the use of the spit valve.

Feel free to add to this list. I'm always happy to learn new tricks to add to my palette of "ornaments". :D
 

andyp

Active Member
Like What Sharp? mine depends on the context, varying from a slight mutter under the breath (stage) to a complete "point and laugh" from my front row colleagues (rehearsal)!

At one of my previous bands, the poor rep player got the blame for every split from sop (me) to bottom third, just cos she blushed instantly whenever the conductor looked anywhere near her direction! :oops:

ROTFLMAO at Dr Cornet's post above..... :lol:
 

WhatSharp?

Active Member
The claxon - starts off as a common split but misses completely resulting in a noise the pitch of which is totally unknown. Usually found lurking above the stave on FF (or FFFFFFFFF for Mr McFayden :D ) shock notes.

:D
 

iggmeister

Member
Tromgod said:
Old lesson that I learned from others.................if you split a note, tut then point to person next to you while shaking head if the conductor looks in your direction.

:twisted: :lol: :arrow:

You would blame the triangle player if you could Tromgod!! :p

If I split a high note I tend to make a sort of "oohhh" sound as if Lennox Lewis had punched me in the stomach. Splitting lower notes though is even worse- little excuse then.

On a recent contest performance our sop player slightly fluffed a high Bb and was allegedly heard by the front row of the audience to suggest that the split note didn't know who it's father was. Fortunately, on the CD recording nothing came out.

It is strange how little attention you play to splits when practising on your own though as compared to when you sit in a band rehearsal/ concert/ or contest.

As for what reaction you should make, I don't think it makes any difference. I have heard absolute howlers on stage and have seen some players not even flinch as if nothing had happened. Others have reacted as if they had just lost the winning lottery ticket. Either way, the audience knows, (and in the case of the Nationals Finals will apparently make you aware of it!). Just one of the perils of being a brass player I suppose.

Pro players dont seem to react that much and just get on with the job. I think whatever reaction allows you to get on, put it behind you and play the next part is the right reaction.

Igg
 

PeterBale

Moderator
Staff member
I'm a firm believer in simply carrying on regardless, without reacting at all. If the audience and/or the band have noticed it then any reaction from you isn't going to change things, and if they haven't, or if they were unsure of who it was, then any reaction willl simply draw their attention to you. If you can just ignore it and carry on as usual, even those who were sure it was you may start to have doubts.

And, of course, if the conductor does look across, make sure you look him in the eye as though you played it perfectly :oops: :wink: :lol:
 

HBB

Active Member
WhatSharp? said:
Depends on the split :

Total Miss (resulting in obscure sound ) : Front Row (and Me) collapse with laughter, band stops, condcutor (laughing) "what was that?"

.

It's not just the front row that laughs at you Steve. ....
 
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