Smoking Ban.

Sopha

Active Member
The Smoking ban should have come in years ago
I totally agree with you Ian it definitely should of came in AGES ago.
why are we always the last? Irland had it before us and when my mum and dad went over there they said that was the best thing ever!
I'm SO glad the smoking ban has come in because now i dont smell of smoke every time i go in the pubs and i dont have to worry about getting short of breath!
I think it's a really good idea but now in the streets theres fag ends everywhere!
Does anyone know anyone who's given up smoking becoz of the ban? because i dont.
 

tpcornet12

Member
I totally agree with you Ian it definitely should of came in AGES ago.
why are we always the last? Irland had it before us and when my mum and dad went over there they said that was the best thing ever!
I'm SO glad the smoking ban has come in because now i dont smell of smoke every time i go in the pubs and i dont have to worry about getting short of breath!
I think it's a really good idea but now in the streets theres fag ends everywhere!
Does anyone know anyone who's given up smoking becoz of the ban? because i dont.

I quit smoking at new year with the ban in mind. I figured if I managed the 6 months before the ban then life would be easy after the ban (if you now what I mean?) I know a lot of people said "I'm gonna give up when the ban kicks in" but they haven't. I always said to them that just because you can't smoke in pubs won't mean you automatically won't want to smoke!!

I suppose there would be a lot of so called "Social Smokers" now realising they were in denial all along and were in fact as addicted as anyone!

I'm happy to be a non-smoker now though. It wasn't easy though - 3rd time trying and smoked for 18 years! But this is the longest its ever been and I feel with the ban there is less chance of me getting tempted to start again. :tup
 

Morghoven

Member
Even as a smoker myself, I support the ban but am a little narked that there are still certain institutions and properties, largely owned by Her Majesty, which are above the law and therefore not subject to it. The House of Commons bar might be one such! And of course the notion that a prisoner, in whichever HM prison, can continue to smoke, since there is also the issue of what one defines as one's domicile and what is a public place, is rather irksome.

I have no idea whether it is true (having not 'been inside'), but this will do nothing to help the popular perception that prisoners are treated somewhat better than the rest of the country. I suppose it's not really possible to argue that prison is a "public place"...but then by very definition, one could say the same about private members' clubs, but the ban still covers them...

I understand that the ban does indeed cover the Palace of Westminster, and that even as we speak (or write) a new title is being sought for the Members' Smoking Room! I did not realise that property owned by the Crown was not subject to the rule of law - can anyone provide evidence of this, or is it just a myth?
 

brassneck

Active Member
There are a few exceptions to the ban, including: offshore oil rigs, hotel rooms and prison cells. England will not be following entirely in Scotland's footsteps, since actors in England will be able to smoke on stage where it is required for "artistic integrity" unlike their fellow thespians performing in Scotland

http://fitsugar.com/360916

Some places, such as bus shelters, coach stations (outside), phone boxes, hotel rooms, nursing homes and psychiatric wards are excluded.

http://www.answers.com/topic/list-of-smoking-bans
 

ju33les

Member
Just for info:

Smoking in prison is ONLY allowed inside the prison CELLS. In fact, in some prisons it is banned completely if the prisoners are under the age of 21, or at the Governor's discretion in adult establishments.

Staff are forbidden to enter a cell to smoke a cigarette, and have to use a designated area outside if there is one.

Hope this helps...before the smokers decide to commit crime and add to the over-crowding issues!!!

:)
 

tpcornet12

Member
I did not realise that property owned by the Crown was not subject to the rule of law - can anyone provide evidence of this, or is it just a myth?

I think it's more a question of definition. Westminster is not a public place (legally defined) but is apparently a Palace so therefore not covered in the law. I believe they have made it smoke free so as not to appear to have double standards.
I work for HM (something) and none of our buildings (whether owned by the Crown or not) have any provision for smoking.
 

eanto

Member
I'm happy to be a non-smoker now though. It wasn't easy though - 3rd time trying and smoked for 18 years! But this is the longest its ever been and I feel with the ban there is less chance of me getting tempted to start again. :tup

Good luck staying quit! 3rd time lucky and all that. Definately worth the effort. The first 5 years were the worst for me! I think the ban is brilliant, popin' into pub after practice is much better now. I can sympathise with the smokers (as an ex-smoker) but I honestly didn't realise how bad it was. I was totally oblivious to how unpleasant the atmosphere was to us non-smokers!
 

tpcornet12

Member
Did anyone see the news report that showed an experiment with bar workers before and after the ban? They estimated that the average bar worker "passive smokes" the equivilent of 12 cigs per day! 2 days after the ban the carbon monoxide in their blood had massively decreased.
 

BbBill

Supporting Member
Quote:
Some places, such as bus shelters, coach stations (outside), phone boxes, hotel rooms, nursing homes and psychiatric wards are excluded.


Yeh I wondered about hotel rooms, I stayed at a Premier lodge in Livingston last month and I had to go through the corridor of smoking rooms to get to my non smoking room! Didnt like the smell at all and Ive stopped now for 2 and a half years.

I was just a social smoker before, prob having a couple on band nights and about 30 odd on a saturday night when out on the drink! Never felt I needed to smoke during the week tho as I was always busy, but if I was away driving in the work van Id smoke.

One saturday night I finished the packet I was on and quit just like that, (a few months before the Scottish ban came in) and havnt wanted one since.
 

brassneck

Active Member
I still find it amusing that people still want to go out in pouring rain to have a 'smoke'. I wouldn't be surprised to see some canopies or shelters being built to accomodate smokers.
 

tpcornet12

Member
I still find it amusing that people still want to go out in pouring rain to have a 'smoke'. I wouldn't be surprised to see some canopies or shelters being built to accomodate smokers.

Most pubs have provided some kind of shelter from what I have seen. Also, the pubs doing the most trade since the ban seem to be the ones that have invested heavily in providing accomodation for smokers. One pub I know in stockport has a juke box, big screen for football, outdoor heaters etc all under a canopy... basically the pub has moved outside.
 

Morghoven

Member
Did anyone see the news report that showed an experiment with bar workers before and after the ban? They estimated that the average bar worker "passive smokes" the equivilent of 12 cigs per day! 2 days after the ban the carbon monoxide in their blood had massively decreased.

Yes, but I also saw an interview with the professor who first conclusively proved the link between cigarettes and lung cancer, and he said there was no proof of any similar link with passive smoking...

Before I get shot down in flames, let me say that it's blatantly obvious that it's better for people not to be breathing in smoke - whether that's first- or second-hand. We don't need boffins to tell us that!! I'm just pointing out that you can make a study prove pretty much anything you want it to; I bet if a pro-smoking pressure group had commissioned exactly the same experiment it would have come out with a totally different conclusion...!

With the recent proposal about organ donations, it suddenly becomes clear why the government is so keen for us to keep our bodies pure and healthy - it's so we can become part of the recycling scheme... :eek:
 

tpcornet12

Member
With the recent proposal about organ donations, it suddenly becomes clear why the government is so keen for us to keep our bodies pure and healthy - it's so we can become part of the recycling scheme... :eek:

Which I personally would be quite happy about! IMHO my lifeless body belongs to no-one and if any bit of it saves a life then happy days :)
 

BbBill

Supporting Member
So presuming that quite a few folk will give up smoking, what will the government tax us on now, due to lost revenue from fag packets.......?

Hmmm now let me see......
 

Griffin

Active Member
So presuming that quite a few folk will give up smoking, what will the government tax us on now, due to lost revenue from fag packets.......?

Hmmm now let me see......
i dont reckon it'l be alcohol because from what i understand.. less people are going to the pub now
 

Bungle

Member
i dont reckon it'l be alcohol because from what i understand.. less people are going to the pub now

Probably more people drinking at home though. They are also looking at loosing revenue from raising the smoking age to 18.

By smokers sitting outside with a drink, does this mean we will move to a more european Cafe culture, reducing binge drinking?
 

PeterBale

Moderator
Staff member
We have a little cafe at the end of our road that serves very good, basic food, but has always been a very smokey environment. They have now placed a table outside (with a bucket of sand for the dog-ends!!!) and it seems a much more pleasant place. I don't know whether they thought to get permission for the table outside, but they certainly seem to be as busy as ever, and it makes it a much more attractive prospect than before.
 

SuperMosh

New Member
One pub in England has tried to beat the ban .... ;)

- view the story here

Oh, are beer gardens exempt?

Slightly off topic maybe but we have the highest threat of terrorist attack ever, even since the IRA were knocking about, we have a summer washout, people being flooded and a missing 4 year old british girl abroad.

Good old British folk - in the midst of these difficult times, a landlord tries to convert his pub into sovereign soil to avoid the smoking ban. Genius. I liked the bit where his mate, the Cardinal made him a Knight!
 
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