slow movements from great test pieces

kaderschaufel

New Member
do you know slow movements from contest pieces that have been published separately? Here are the ones I know:

Elegy from A Downland Suite
In Memoriam from Royal Parks
Sweet Shepherdess from Cross Patonce
Melting the Ice from Ginnungagap
 
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Tom-King

Well-Known Member
Is the elegy from downland suite published separately?
Every time I've played it it's been from the original?
 

Anno Draconis

Well-Known Member
do you know hymn tunes (or any kind of slow music) from contest pieces that have been published separately? Here are the ones I know:

Elegy from A Downland Suite
In Memoriam from Royal Parks
Sweet Shepherdess from Cross Patonce
Melting the Ice from Ginnungagap
A Time for Peace (Essence of Time)
The Holy Well (On Alderley Edge)
 

kaderschaufel

New Member
ok, I was actually thinking of slow music inside contest pieces, that is published the way it is actually played in the contest piece.

they tend to be much more spectacular than ordinary hymn tune arrangements, so they are great concert items. I really hope that the Fraternity chorale is gonna be published separately.
 

John Brooks

Well-Known Member
At the risk of being a called a nit picker (or something else) and St. Magnus aside (because it is and was first a hymn tune from with Kenneth Downie subsequently contrived his masterful variations and not the other way around)........these examples all appear to be slow movements from contest pieces. Beautiful as they are, do they constitute being considered a "hymn tune"? There is no text associated with these examples is there? While not a test piece, one example of a beautiful theme evolving into something like a hymn tune is the largo from Dvorak's New World Symphony which has become known as "Going Home". I think a collection of "Melodies from Great Test Pieces" (as in "Melodies for the Great Composers" in the classical world) might be a more apt designation. Whether such a publication would ever see the light of day, given the various publishers involved, is probably doubtful. I do agree that there are some wonderful melodies in many of the larger works.
Here's one definition of hymn tune:
A hymn tune is the melody of a musical composition to which a hymn text is sung. Musically speaking, a hymn is generally understood to have four-part (or more) harmony, a fast harmonic rhythm (chords change frequently), and no refrain or chorus.
 

kaderschaufel

New Member
A hymn tune is the melody of a musical composition to which a hymn text is sung. Musically speaking, a hymn is generally understood to have four-part (or more) harmony, a fast harmonic rhythm (chords change frequently), and no refrain or chorus.
thank you for the clarification, I'm not a native English speaker. If I remember correctly, the composer of Ginnungagap, Johan Evenepoel, calls his Melting the Ice a hymn tune (though he probably isn't a native English speaker either).
 

Tom-King

Well-Known Member
If we're talking about testpieces that use hymn tunes (or are based on hymn tunes) that's different - eg: Variations on Laudate Dominum, Variations on Maccabeus.
 

4th Cornet

Well-Known Member
At the risk of being a called a nit picker (or something else) and St. Magnus aside (because it is and was first a hymn tune from with Kenneth Downie subsequently contrived his masterful variations and not the other way around)........these examples all appear to be slow movements from contest pieces. Beautiful as they are, do they constitute being considered a "hymn tune"? There is no text associated with these examples is there? While not a test piece, one example of a beautiful theme evolving into something like a hymn tune is the largo from Dvorak's New World Symphony which has become known as "Going Home". I think a collection of "Melodies from Great Test Pieces" (as in "Melodies for the Great Composers" in the classical world) might be a more apt designation. Whether such a publication would ever see the light of day, given the various publishers involved, is probably doubtful. I do agree that there are some wonderful melodies in many of the larger works.
Here's one definition of hymn tune:
A hymn tune is the melody of a musical composition to which a hymn text is sung. Musically speaking, a hymn is generally understood to have four-part (or more) harmony, a fast harmonic rhythm (chords change frequently), and no refrain or chorus.
I thought the OP's post asked for "hymn tunes (or any kind of slow music)".
 

4th Cornet

Well-Known Member
Read about two posts back "ok, I rephrased the question now......."
I'm aware of that. He changed it from "hymn tunes (or any kind of slow music)" to "slow movements". Your post seemed like a 'nit pick' (your words) of those that had offered non-hymns as suggestions when the OP had originally asked for these as well as hymns. Not worth arguing over x
 

iancwilx

Well-Known Member
do you know slow movements from contest pieces that have been published separately? Here are the ones I know:

Elegy from A Downland Suite
In Memoriam from Royal Parks
Sweet Shepherdess from Cross Patonce
Melting the Ice from Ginnungagap
Middle of Festival Music and middle of Tournament for Brass
 
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