Seperate

rutty

Active Member
I always spell that wrong you know. Separate just doesn't look right to me. </random>
 

Big Twigge

Active Member
I'm never sure on which it is either (although when I saw the thread, and before I knew what it was about I thought it was spelt wrongly)
Practise/practice always gets me...which in correct, which is the American spelling which isn't?!
 

TuTuKu

Active Member
Big Twigge said:
I'm never sure on which it is either (although when I saw the thread, and before I knew what it was about I thought it was spelt wrongly)
Practise/practice always gets me...which in correct, which is the American spelling which isn't?!
I think one is a noun and one a verb ie "To practice a cornet" and "A doctor's Practise" but not sure which way they go round!
That's how i interpreted my english teacher's ramblings at school anyway!
 

Darth_Tuba

Active Member
Big Twigge said:
Practise/practice always gets me...which in correct, which is the American spelling which isn't?!
Both are correct. Practise is the verb and Practice is the noun I think. Hence a dental practice and I am going to practise some scales. May be wrong though. :D
 

louise0502

Member
Darth_Tuba said:
Although I think I had 'em the right way round
Yep, you did. I remember it's the same as 'to advise' and 'some advice', which are actually said differently too. i.e. 'to practise' and 'some practice'.

Also, there's a rat in separate!
 

TuTuKu

Active Member
Darth_Tuba said:
Beat me to it. Although I think I had 'em the right way round.
Think you do! it's just i always thnk "to practise..." looks wrong and should look better with a c!


Ooo and affect and effect i can never remember which way round they are and just go on what looks best!
 

akwarose

Active Member
ditto.
another one that gets me......guarantee. i always spelt it garantee.......hmm

and rhythm. i always think there should be a 'y' before the m!!!
 

PeterBale

Moderator
Staff member
Darth_Tuba said:
Both are correct. Practise is the verb and Practice is the noun I think. Hence a dental practice and I am going to practise some scales. May be wrong though. :D
. . . and the dentist is going to practise some de-scaling in her practice :shock: :oops: :wink:
 

akwarose

Active Member
yeh, i only jus started spellin that one right, after 11 years of compulsory schooling :shock:

only did it coz my english teacher told me the right way
 

PeterBale

Moderator
Staff member
akwarose said:
yeh, i only jus started spellin that one right, after 11 years of compulsory schooling :shock:

only did it coz my english teacher told me the right way
Did your English teacher not tell you how to spell it correctly, how to use the shift key on the keyboard, and how to put the final letters on words like "just" and "spelling" :?: :wink: :lol:
 

Liz Courts

Active Member
louise0502 said:
here's another one - definitely, not definately!
My English teacher had a thing about that word - she gave us loads of spelling tests until we all got it right!! Now I never spell it wrong, but ALWAYS notice when other people spell it with an a instead of an i :roll: !!!
 

louise0502

Member
x_lizc_x said:
louise0502 said:
here's another one - definitely, not definately!
My English teacher had a thing about that word - she gave us loads of spelling tests until we all got it right!! Now I never spell it wrong, but ALWAYS notice when other people spell it with an a instead of an i !!!
Yeah my english teacher gave us a spelling test (which i thought i'd do quite well in) on words we always get wrong and i got 11 out of 20! I had no idea about most of them, i just always thought it was spelt with an 'a'.
 

PeterBale

Moderator
Staff member
louise0502 said:
. . . i just always thought it was spelt with an 'a'.
Reminds me of the old quizz question: "Antiparliamentarydisestablishmentarianism is a very long word - spell it" :wink:
 

Brian Bowen

Active Member
And while we're talking about spelling, the most persistent error one sees on tMP is probably:

your when you mean you're

So:

Your [= something belonging to you] instrument is silver.

You're [= you are] going to like that silver instrument.

:)
 

PeterBale

Moderator
Staff member
The second most comon one may be the incorrect use of "its" over "it's". It is an awkward one, as it doesn't follow the normal rules for the use of the apostrophe, but "it's" should be limited to what would normally be written as "it is".

In other words, you can say of the cornet: "It's a silver cornet"

but you should say: "Its plating is silver, rather than gold". :wink:
 

rutty

Active Member
My mobile phone predictive text jobby doesn't seem to know the word "isn't" for some reason. Plus if I want to use the word "I've" (I always use the apostrophes even when texting) it seems to think that there's a word that starts "I'o..." seeing as that's the first varient it gives me.

Stupid phone :(
 

Liz Courts

Active Member
PeterBale said:
The second most comon one may be the incorrect use of "its" over "it's". It is an awkward one, as it doesn't follow the normal rules for the use of the apostrophe, but "it's" should be limited to what would normally be written as "it is".

In other words, you can say of the cornet: "It's a silver cornet"

but you should say: "Its plating is silver, rather than gold". :wink:
As my English teacher used to say to us, "'It' can never own anything... :( " Then we would all cry :cry: because it's (it is!) sad!!!! Poor it...
 
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