Rococo Variations - British Open Test Piece

Anglo Music Press

Well-Known Member
Why is it that there is always erattae after a new piece has been published for a major competition. Bands have to fork out what £70 - 80 for the complete set of parts plus conductors score, and there are these erattae?? Anyone ideas?

It's because errors in the setting of the score and parts are not picked up before the piece is published.....

And it's not 'always'. I haven't seen any errata posted for any of the lower section finals pieces.

(by the way, just to point out how easy it is to make a mistake, 'errata' is already a plural and therefore 'erattae' doesn't exist as a word !!) ;)
 

MRSH

Supporting Member
And it's not 'always'. I haven't seen any errata posted for any of the lower section finals pieces.
I have been waiting to see if an official list was going to be published for the 3rd Section Finals piece to compare against mine which is longer than my arm :eek:
 

bassinthebathroom

Active Member
Loving playing the piece so far, and I'm not normally a huge fan of Gregson's work - this feels and sounds pretty different from most of his earlier works. Most of the errata are common sense (except the tempo alterations - has he just changed his mind?), but it's still pretty poor going, especially with dynamics attached to the wrong stave or missing altogether. There are a lot of instances of parts not matching the score at all, which is also pretty bad. That aside though, great piece - roll on the 13th!
 

Vickitorious

Active Member
So how involved was Khachaturian in the Brass Band scene ?

And apart from Eric Ball and John McCabe who are the other 4 composers payed homage to? The programme notes don't 'name and shame'.


Interestingly I heard the premiere of Wilby's latest work, Psalms and alleluias, by the National Children's Brass Band last weekend and to me there seemed to be a couple of cloudcatcher-ish quotations in that too. Good piece though, and a spectacular performance by the NCBBGB.

The toccatta is Elgar Howarth, and the Siciliano is Malcolm Arnold. I'm a bit stuck to who the Lament and the Fugal Scherzo are in the style of though.

I didn't like the piece at all at first, but now we're rehearsing it you can see how clever it is, and i think it's great :)
 

HBB

Active Member
The toccatta is Elgar Howarth, and the Siciliano is Malcolm Arnold. I'm a bit stuck to who the Lament and the Fugal Scherzo are in the style of though.

I didn't like the piece at all at first, but now we're rehearsing it you can see how clever it is, and i think it's great :)


The order is:

Theme (Traditional Rococo Baroque style)
Tocatta, Elgar Howarth
Sicilliana, Ray Steadmann-Allen
Waltz, Eric Ball
Molto Perpetuo, John McCabe,
Lament, Wilfred Heaton
Fugal Scherzo, Philip Wilby.

All the composers are quite easy to recognise, maybe with the exception of Steadmann-Allen and Philip Wilby, as these both sound more Gregson than their respective homages.
 

Vickitorious

Active Member
The order is:

Theme (Traditional Rococo Baroque style)
Tocatta, Elgar Howarth
Sicilliana, Ray Steadmann-Allen
Waltz, Eric Ball
Molto Perpetuo, John McCabe,
Lament, Wilfred Heaton
Fugal Scherzo, Philip Wilby.

All the composers are quite easy to recognise, maybe with the exception of Steadmann-Allen and Philip Wilby, as these both sound more Gregson than their respective homages.

Nice one Ben!! I apologise for saying it was Malcolm Arnold :rolleyes:
 
The order is:

Theme (Traditional Rococo Baroque style)
Tocatta, Elgar Howarth
Sicilliana, Ray Steadmann-Allen
Waltz, Eric Ball
Molto Perpetuo, John McCabe,
Lament, Wilfred Heaton
Fugal Scherzo, Philip Wilby.

All the composers are quite easy to recognise, maybe with the exception of Steadmann-Allen and Philip Wilby, as these both sound more Gregson than their respective homages.

Agree Ben. The Siciliana although it includes references to "Lord of the Sea" bears much more resemblance to the second variation of "Laudate Dominum".
 

HBB

Active Member
Agree Ben. The Siciliana although it includes references to "Lord of the Sea" bears much more resemblance to the second variation of "Laudate Dominum".

Yes Paul, once I had the 'Lord of the Sea' theme pointed out to me you can really hear it underlying through most of the movement (mainly in the Euphoniums actually), but the similarity to the Siciliana in 'Laudate' is overbearing - all that's missing is a huge horn countermelody!!
 

TopTrump

Member
Wicker's World!

Just to lighten up this whole debate, for those of us old enough to remember it, I reckon the final section of Rococo uses the same chord sequence as the middle 8 of the Wicker's World theme music!!!:guiness:guiness:guiness:terrier
 
Corner Men / Women confirmations Th'open.

Be good to hear great players in new corner seats at Th'open, e.g Leslie Howie @ Fodens.

The rumbling issue of who's on Sop with the "dogs" is an interesting one as usual, rumour has it 4 bars rest has the wrong name next to the sop seat in their list of corner players ?!?!? but this has changed only in the last few days !!!!.

Anyway top piece, top venue, top banding......
 

critic

Member
The toccatta is Elgar Howarth, and the Siciliano is Malcolm Arnold. I'm a bit stuck to who the Lament and the Fugal Scherzo are in the style of though.

I didn't like the piece at all at first, but now we're rehearsing it you can see how clever it is, and i think it's great :)

yes is a great piece willned lots of stamina to do it justice
 

Humphrey

Member
There's a lovely quote from Etrange #3 by the composer Marius Constant immediately before the Eb Bass muted solo :)

* Etrange #3 is the theme tune to "The Twilight Zone".
 

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