Practice without instrument

GER

Active Member
Hi, Has anybody got any tips, advice on practising when you don't have your instrument. My main ones are:
Spare mouthpiece in car to practice tonguing, slurring etc on way to work
During dinnertime,studying part and practising fingering of tricky passages
Holding pencil in lips to help strengthen muscles.
What methods do you use?
 

Euphonium Lite

Active Member
All of the above. Plus if you have a decent recording of the piece(s) you are working on, listen to them. Its still practice. Or listen to a recording of yourself/your band and be analytical and CONSTRUCTIVELY critical of it (or better still all of the aforementioned)

Try and envisage the parts you cant play well yet, and try and find ways of making them better/easier - be that alternative fingering, giving yourself room to play awkward intervals, working our where you are going to breathe. And sing your part - Ive heard that Eikanger dont try and actually play a piece until they can sing it (helps with pitching, phrasing, etc)
 

GER

Active Member
And sing your part - Ive heard that Eikanger dont try and actually play a piece until they can sing it (helps with pitching, phrasing, etc)
I've heard rumours of bands singing their parts before, but have never come across it, would be interested to know if any british bands use this technique. I do sing parts in my head,but not out loud, it never sounds right. (and it makes the dog howl:))
 

Slider1

Active Member
I've heard rumours of bands singing their parts before, but have never come across it, would be interested to know if any british bands use this technique. I do sing parts in my head,but not out loud, it never sounds right. (and it makes the dog howl:))
We do this a lot, don't end up playing much though.:(:(
 

Tom-King

Well-Known Member
I've heard rumours of bands singing their parts before, but have never come across it, would be interested to know if any british bands use this technique. I do sing parts in my head,but not out loud, it never sounds right. (and it makes the dog howl:))
I've played in bands that have done it occasionally - can't say I'm overly keen (I can't sing well at all, not even in the shower!)
 

Queeg2000

Active Member
I've taken music to work before to practice fingering on fast pieces to build up the muscle memory. Worked well for me.
 

kaderschaufel

New Member
There‘s a new fancy toy by Stomvi, called Upsound, where you can put your mouthpiece in. It's supposed to feel like playing the instrument, although I've never tried it.
 

Jack E

Well-Known Member
I've heard rumours of bands singing their parts before, but have never come across it, would be interested to know if any british bands use this technique.
Our band uses this a lot, especially if some players are having problems with a tricky run of notes, or with intonation. Having watched from the outside, I can say two things; many of them are as uncomfortable about it as Tom King - but it definitely works.

I've also found that whistling my own part in my head is a big help - especially as, playing baritone, I'm usually not carrying the melody, but playing something which, in isolation, sounds anything from pretty odd to totally weird!
 
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