Playing the race card

MoominDave

Well-Known Member
Accidental said:
Interesting - the moment I mention people of other cultures/religions, you all seem to think I was talking about people who've just chosen to arrive in this country. What about 2nd, 3rd, 4th.... generation British Born non-Christian people?

I realise that not all (in fact probably very few) moves that people make into foreign cultures are voluntary, but doing so carries a certain responsibility: that if one - quite understandably - wishes to educate any children one may have subsequent to arriving in the way in which one was educated (and note that this includes religion), one must convey to them why one has placed them in the awkward position that one has, and how one has coped with the cross-cultural strains that one's newly-introduced (to the country that is) attitudes from one's original culture have helped to cause (*). To fail to do so or to do so while emphasising a difference between 'us' and 'them' is to derelict one's social responsibility in the most serious possible way. Of course, this also depends on the co-operation of one's new neighbours, and this is where the original inhabitants musn't be led to feel insecure/threatened - observe the troubles that the Jews have run into over the centuries, which have certainly not been helped by a conscious policy of social isolation, even when in a tiny minority.
Essentially, everyone applying a bit of understanding can allow these things to work, but legalising religious favouritism against the hosts' religion is not going to encourage any of the hosts to feel understanding...

Apologies for the long and tedious posts!

Dave

(*) Could I just apologise for the dreadfully convoluted and possibly incomprehensible English in that sentence?! Basically I'm saying that you need to give your kids a helping hand. This can be extended for as many generations as one cares to maintain one's original cultural values for.
 

Steve

Active Member
trombelle said:
even if you could speak for example, french, but while in france spoke english to your family/friends would you be surprised if ppl were angry? course you would, it's up to you what language you speak.

Rubbish, I would only speak English to someone who had no grasp of the French language, and then would do my best to explain to any french people around me what was said. I was refering to two fluent english speaking, english born hindus speaking in their parents native language just because they feel like it, of course that is going to get English peoples backs up.

BottyBurp said:
Is being xenophobic (as opposed to racism) such a bad thing? Why should we allow the fabric of our society be eroded? Why should we open the gates to hundreds of thousands of immigrants to pour into our country?

This I agree with, I am proud to be English/British. Does anyone recall LePen, the french extremeist that almost won their last election. Like the BNP he goes overboard at times but I fully agree with people sitting test to integrate them into British life. Much like Apu on the simpsons, who spent time studying the American history and lifestyle to become an American citizen.
 
BottyBurp said:
Where I live, the BNP has made massive inroads in their popularity as the mainstream parties won't curb immigration. Whilst I disagree with most of the BNP's policies, I can see them gaining a few seats round here.

I really resent my taxes being spent housing "asylum seekers".

The fact that the BNP are winning more seats is surely a sign that many people are unhappy about the idea of equality amoung groups. More in a sense that ethnic groups seem to be getting a better deal from the government.

The way we are heading at the moment is backwards, not forwards, and if this unrest continues then prehaps we should change the name of our country to DisUnited Kingdom until we come to some sort of agreement between cultures and race!
 

Steve

Active Member
[quote="VenusTromsterThe fact that the BNP are winning more seats is surely a sign that many people are unhappy about the idea of equality amoung groups. More in a sense that ethnic groups seem to be getting a better deal from the government.[/quote]

I disagree, it is a sign that more and more people are realising that we are well past equality and are swinging in the opposite direction. If equality existed in this country or any other then this thread would not have even begun and certainly wouldnt be a hot issue, it would just be accepted
 

Pythagoras

Active Member
Steve21 said:
I disagree, it is a sign that more and more people are realising that we are well past equality and are swinging in the opposite direction. If equality existed in this country or any other then this thread would not have even begun and certainly wouldnt be a hot issue, it would just be accepted

What are you judging your basis of equality on? Average income per household. Proportion of children leaving school with no qualifications/entering higher education, Proportion of the prison population. I agree that things like not being able to put out George crosses are ridiculous but 'well past equality and swinging in the other direction' is going a bit far in my opinion.

Another thing that is unequal is the House of Lords. There are Bishops in there from the C of E just because they are C of E bishops. Where are the official representatives of other faiths and other Christian denominations, and atheism. I know there are people from other faiths in the House of Lords but they are not there automatically because of there faith. I am not arguing for putting the Chief Rabbi etc in more for not having the C of E bishops in automatically.
 

BottyBurp

Member
VenusTromster said:
The fact that the BNP are winning more seats is surely a sign that many people are unhappy about the idea of equality amoung groups.

I'm not unhappy about the idea of equality among groups, I'm unhappy that the UK has so many immigrants (of all races). We can't even provide for our own indigenous population adequately, let alone people from other countries.

If we didn't fund immigrants, we might even be able to pay for students to go to Uni etc, without clobbering them with a few grand debt...etc....nurses.... etc....
 

JessopSmythe

Active Member
trombelle said:
jus a thought about people talking in different languages.....
the british are well known for rarely bothering to learn other languages when they go abroad. i bet most british people barely speak a word of french/italian/greek/ etc when they go on

There's a bit of a difference between going on holiday and going to live somewhere. Whilst I accept the fact that all immigrants are entitled to retain their own cultural / religious and linguistic. distinctions we should not forget that we have our own culture too. I moved into wales some years ago and am quite proud of the fact that I now speak more welsh than people my age that were born here. I moved into another country and made a concious effort to learn the language and history. I'm now pretty much accepted as local as, even though one or two people may pick up on my accent, they recognize that I am making an effort. None of this detracts in any way from the fact that I was born in England and am proud of it, you don't have to throw your history away to understand someone elses!
 

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