Pieces due for a comeback

tubafran

Active Member
Concert Music

At a concert last Saturday we threw in Choral & Rock Out and Hootenany. Both have been in the library for years and were due for re-consideration in our concert programmes.

We had no rehearsal on Hootenany so the reps got a nice surprise for the Chicken Reel part. Both went down and storm and got the best applause of the night. Don't mind Choral & RockOut but I've played Hootenany too many times in the past and don't think there's much we can do with it; perhaps it will have to return to the library for another 5 years.
 

Pythagoras

Active Member
Re: Concert Music

tubafran said:
At a concert last Saturday we threw in Choral & Rock Out and Hootenany. Both have been in the library for years and were due for re-consideration in our concert programmes.

We had no rehearsal on Hootenany so the reps got a nice surprise for the Chicken Reel part. Both went down and storm and got the best applause of the night. Don't mind Choral & RockOut but I've played Hootenany too many times in the past and don't think there's much we can do with it; perhaps it will have to return to the library for another 5 years.

Was the first time I'd played Hootenany. Didn't like it :p
 

nickjones

Active Member
I think that Hootanany is rubbish , same for instant concert and Instant Christmas....I am sure we can find something else from the archives that is good for audiences to listen too.....audiences need a reminder that we have clever original and arranged works that are much better than that rubbish...rant over
 
nickjbeaumarisband said:
I think that Hootanany is rubbish , same for instant concert and Instant Christmas....I am sure we can find something else from the archives that is good for audiences to listen too.....audiences need a reminder that we have clever original and arranged works that are much better than that rubbish...rant over

I think any band or MD who pulls out hootenany in this day and age needs a kick up the arse and their baton stolen. - Congrats on reminding everyone how fantastically cliche'd we are!
 

nickjones

Active Member
Theme and Cooperation - Joseph Horovitz last used 1994 Nationals
English Heritage - George Lloyd 1991 Mineworkers / 1993 Masters
Seascapes - RSA 1988 Nationals not used since
when are we going to see these test pieces used again?
 

brassneck

Active Member
You can maybe add Red Earth (Roland Wiltgen), The Devil And The Deep Blue Sea (Derek Bourgeois), Isaiah 40 (Robert Redhead), Volcano (Robert Simpson), Seid (Torstein Aagard-Nilsen) and Elgar Howarth is surely due a comeback? (Songs For B.L., Hymns At Heaven's Gate etc.). But then again, given the negativity towards forward-thinking original works more likely to be Life Divine (Cyril Jenkins), High Peak (Eric Ball), or maybe a revival of Gilbert Vinter (John O'Gaunt, Symphony Of Marches, James Cook etc.).
 

johnflugel

Active Member
A few of mine have been mentioned already but:

English Heritage
Volcano
Odin
Devil and the Deep Blue Sea
High Peak (this has really grown on me since hearing it for the first time last year)

I had 'Seid' on in the car the other day. YBS took the Euros on the strength of beating Dyke on this when it was the set work in 1996. Really interesting music and a cracking recording if anyone fancies getting hold of a copy from somewhere. It's on the European 1996 CD of that year and the 'Kings of Europe' disc I think.

In terms of SA banding, there are one or two pieces that merit another airing either on 'big' programmes or recordings.

Thy King Cometh - Leslie Condon work that I think I have mentioned before. Remember hearing a vinyl recording from the 1978 congress with the NYSB playing it and it has stayed with me since. Perhaps not in the same bracket as 'The Present Age', 'Festivity' and 'Song of the Eternal' but definately worth a listen.

I like Eric Ball's 'Old Wells' too - that is a real class piece of writing. Not difficult at all but so well written. Thomas Rives Sypmhonic Variations 'I Know a Fount' was recorded by Hendon a few years ago I think. Would love to hear that given the YBS Essays 'treatment'. Thought their recording of 'Pilgrim Song' by the same composers on No 3 was a great listen.
 

nickjones

Active Member
johnflugel said:
I had 'Seid' on in the car the other day. YBS took the Euros on the strength of beating Dyke on this when it was the set work in 1996. Really interesting music and a cracking recording if anyone fancies getting hold of a copy from somewhere. It's on the European 1996 CD of that year and the 'Kings of Europe' disc I think.

It's a great piece "Seid", YBS winning off two number one draws too.. I dont think it will ever be used in a competition again. Burlesque - Rob Goorhuis which was the set Euro test in 1997 will suffer the same fate which is shame.
I think "Of Men and Mountains" should be used as a set work in at least one of the major competitions.
 

nickjones

Active Member
Good to see " the Four Temprements" or at least 3 movs used at the Danish Nationals...
Introduction and Allegro on a theme by Max Reger would be a brilliant test. or any Robert Simpson works...
 

brassneck

Active Member
For lower sections, wouldn't mind seeing Sinfonietta (Thomas Wilson) and Concert Overture (Vilem Tausky) back in the frame, but unlikely!
 

Straightmute

Active Member
brassneck said:
For lower sections, wouldn't mind seeing Sinfonietta (Thomas Wilson) and Concert Overture (Vilem Tausky) back in the frame, but unlikely!

The Thomas Wilson piece is fantastic but contains so many mistakes and discrepancies between score and parts that it is virtually unplayable. I made a sort of 'performing edition' (ie corrected all the errors!) when Harrogate played it five years ago - I mentioned this to Geoffrey Brand when he owned the R Smith catalogue but he didn't seem particularly interested. I wonder if the new owners of the catalogue might be interested in putting this right?

D
 

Dave Payn

Active Member
Australian Euphonium said:
I think any band or MD who pulls out hootenany in this day and age needs a kick up the **** and their baton stolen. - Congrats on reminding everyone how fantastically cliche'd we are!

This has got me thinking. Purely for 'cheese' factor considerations, I wonder how well a CD of the following would sell:

(In no particular track order)

Hootenanny
Instant Concert
Trumpets Wild (or Bright Eyes)
Floral Dance
Clog Dance
Cavatina
Mellow Mood
The Best of the Seekers
Young Amadeus
Frolic for Trombones (or Trombones to the Fore)
Forty Fathoms (or Tuba Smarties)
To a Wild Rose
Lincolnshire Poacher
Sweet Gingerbread Man

After the WoB/tMP compilation ideas, how about starting a CD list entitled Cheese 'Grates' or somesuch. Ideas, please?

DISCLAIMER

I am not necessarily mocking the above works! It's simply that they have formed a lot of the 'bread and butter' lower section bandstand gigs' repertoire over the years on the basis, I guess, that they save SOME rehearsal time! :)
 

groovy

Active Member
Dave Payn said:
This has got me thinking. Purely for 'cheese' factor considerations, I wonder how well a CD of the following would sell:

(In no particular track order)

Hootenanny
Instant Concert
Trumpets Wild (or Bright Eyes)
Floral Dance
Clog Dance
Cavatina
Mellow Mood
The Best of the Seekers
Young Amadeus
Frolic for Trombones (or Trombones to the Fore)
Forty Fathoms (or Tuba Smarties)
To a Wild Rose
Lincolnshire Poacher
Sweet Gingerbread Man

After the WoB/tMP compilation ideas, how about starting a CD list entitled Cheese 'Grates' or somesuch. Ideas, please?

DISCLAIMER

I am not necessarily mocking the above works! It's simply that they have formed a lot of the 'bread and butter' lower section bandstand gigs' repertoire over the years on the basis, I guess, that they save SOME rehearsal time! :)
Not that they save some rehearsal time, but because it's what the punters want! Our audiences love hearing cheese, and, be honest, we love playing it too. :p When we ask for requests then its pieces like the above and "The Best of Abba" etc that people want to hear. The "proper" music needs a different kind of audience, one which I don't believe the brass band world has found yet.
 

Dave Payn

Active Member
groovy said:
Not that they save some rehearsal time, but because it's what the punters want! Our audiences love hearing cheese, and, be honest, we love playing it too. :p When we ask for requests then its pieces like the above and "The Best of Abba" etc that people want to hear. The "proper" music needs a different kind of audience, one which I don't believe the brass band world has found yet.

Up to a point, I agree with you, BUT... if that's truly what the 'punters' want, why has no recording company seen fit to release a recording of those tracks I mentioned on one CD, at least on a regular basis? My own (purely personal) view is that maybe the punters liked that sort of thing a few years back, but a lot of the above, even in bandstand terms, is a wee bit past its sell by date. (I make this judgement based on audience reaction in recent years!)AGAIN, I re-iterate, I'm not mocking the individual pieces but do we not underestimate the bandstand audiences to a degree these days? I'm not for one minute suggesting that we should feed them a diet of serious brass band original works, but with arrangers coming to the fore of the calibre of Andy Duncan, Mark Freeh, etc. (not to mention the plethora of arrangers and composers who frequent these boards like Timbone, Straightmute, HBB, GJG, MRSH etc.) and the adaptability of the likes of Philip Sparke to arrange more ambitious easy listening/light classics/big band etc. isn't it time to, by and large, put the 'old warhorses' to bed?
 

groovy

Active Member
Dave Payn said:
Up to a point, I agree with you, BUT... if that's truly what the 'punters' want, why has no recording company seen fit to release a recording of those tracks I mentioned on one CD, at least on a regular basis? My own (purely personal) view is that maybe the punters liked that sort of thing a few years back, but a lot of the above, even in bandstand terms, is a wee bit past its sell by date. (I make this judgement based on audience reaction in recent years!)AGAIN, I re-iterate, I'm not mocking the individual pieces but do we not underestimate the bandstand audiences to a degree these days? I'm not for one minute suggesting that we should feed them a diet of serious brass band original works, but with arrangers coming to the fore of the calibre of Andy Duncan, Mark Freeh, etc. (not to mention the plethora of arrangers and composers who frequent these boards like Timbone, Straightmute, HBB, GJG, MRSH etc.) and the adaptability of the likes of Philip Sparke to arrange more ambitious easy listening/light classics/big band etc. isn't it time to, by and large, put the 'old warhorses' to bed?
These kind of tracks, if they were recorded, would not sell
a) Because brass band CDs aren't easily accessable to the public unless they were specifically looking for it (eg online)
b) The banders themselves wouldn't buy it, for obvious reasons.
However our band's own CD, which we sell ourselves at concerts, markets etc, has sold very well and it is "cheesy".
Yes, some of the cheesy music could be updated, I agree, but none of my band's audiences have ever complained about our repitoire. This may be because we are one of only two brass bands in the county, and I believe that we play out to the public far more than the other band. (I may be wrong, this is purely based on the fact that I have never seen them playing out or heard of them doing so.) So, the public really isn't hearing a band very often and haven't heard Hootenanny thousands of times.
There is a great collection of light brass band music about, but I personally feel that it can work better in a concert rather than a bandstand job. For this, we need music that is recognisable, popular, and easy - not only to save rehearsal time but also to keep the pressure off on long days of playing. For this purpose the 'old warhorses' fit the bill.
 

Dave Payn

Active Member
groovy said:
These kind of tracks, if they were recorded, would not sell
a) Because brass band CDs aren't easily accessable to the public unless they were specifically looking for it (eg online)
b) The banders themselves wouldn't buy it, for obvious reasons.
However our band's own CD, which we sell ourselves at concerts, markets etc, has sold very well and it is "cheesy".
Yes, some of the cheesy music could be updated, I agree, but none of my band's audiences have ever complained about our repitoire. This may be because we are one of only two brass bands in the county, and I believe that we play out to the public far more than the other band. (I may be wrong, this is purely based on the fact that I have never seen them playing out or heard of them doing so.) So, the public really isn't hearing a band very often and haven't heard Hootenanny thousands of times.
There is a great collection of light brass band music about, but I personally feel that it can work better in a concert rather than a bandstand job. For this, we need music that is recognisable, popular, and easy - not only to save rehearsal time but also to keep the pressure off on long days of playing. For this purpose the 'old warhorses' fit the bill.

We'll have to agree to disagree on this point, Katy, but you put your argument across extremely well (sorry if that sounds patronising. It's certainly not meant to! ;-))
 

brassneck

Active Member
Isn't it a simple case of brass bands in this context meeting the public's expectations? If brass bands are going to be associated with dumbed down/up (cheesy) arrangements and various other pieces from a bye-gone era (... Victorian Culture), then Mr. and Mrs. J. Public are going to hear something they expect to hear. The popular artists who hire brass banders over the years tend to get them for the traditions of banding, not for the potential that is there. Only exception I can name is Groundforce, with James Watson employing Dyke to take-over the wind ensemble incidental music he was originally involved in. I have noted in earlier threads that the top flight have virtually returned to a tried and tested traditional format to entertain audiences. I don't think it is a case of what the punter wants. When was the last time a survey was done to ask them? However, I might be wrong!
 

Dave Payn

Active Member
brassneck said:
Isn't it a simple case of brass bands in this context meeting the public's expectations? If brass bands are going to be associated with dumbed down/up (cheesy) arrangements and various other pieces from a bye-gone era (... Victorian Culture), then Mr. and Mrs. J. Public are going to hear something they expect to hear.

And if you gradually introduce subtle changes in the repertoire, will Mr and Mrs J. Public eventually change their perception of what they want to hear?
 

brassneck

Active Member
Personally I feel that it might be too late! Most audiences are of an older generation and are getting smaller as years go by. I don't think many of them would appreciate or understand, for example, a selection of Radiohead's Greatest Hits. Youth bands can still attract numbers as long as their parents are enthusiastic about them. The general (street) music scene is now so fragmented and controlled by media moguls that even artists have little control over the music they perform. Why is it that Warner Bros. are happy to allow film scores to be arranged ? (under contract of course ... spot the $ sign). People just need to buy the DVD to listen the original music. How would the brass band movement sell itself to the youth of today to attract them to a concert hall? Have the demonstrations in schools that used to be quite common now become a rarity? Banding has potential but how do you really get it across to the general public? Would national advertising do the trick? I'm afraid I have more questions than answers. :-?
 
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