Original Works for Brass Band and Choir

James Yelland

Well-Known Member
It was performed in its entirity at the RAM as part of the Brass Festival that John Wallace ws involved in, I believe with Dyke and students from the RAM making up the band. Definitely one that calls for a new recording, as there were a few balance problems with the soloist, good as he was

Hmm. If we are talking about the same performance - in March 1999 - I have a clear recollection that only the four movements were performed, because I remember coming away from the gig ever so slightly disappointed. I still have the programme but it doesn't give any clues unfortunately.
 

James Yelland

Well-Known Member
What I meant to say earlier is that three of the movements involve the chorus, three are for band alone.

Yes, that is right. There are two interludes for band alone (as well as 'Blazon'). 'Consolation' slots in between 'Destruction' and 'Dedication', and is a slow melancholy tune, the main figure of which reappears in 'Dedication' sung by the chorus. 'Felicitation' slots in between 'Dedication' and 'Revelation', and is a brisk scherzo in triple time, the material of which reappears in a slower, legato guise during the 'sixth trumpet' section of 'Revelation'. Total time approx. 45 minutes. A fine work, and listening to it again for the first time in years, the influence of Belshazzar's Feast seems obvious - to me, anyway.
 

James Yelland

Well-Known Member
I don't know if Sir Threepwood is still looking for suggestions, but I thought I'd revisit this thread in the light of an interesting article by Roy Newsome in the current edition of The Brass Herald.

According to him, the very first original work for band and choir was The Rainbow, by Thomas Wood, written in 1951. I confess I have never heard of piece or composer before! Dependent on Mr Wood's style, it might just fit your criteria. And I must say I'd be fascinated to hear it.

Newsome also mentions Psalm 103 (1973) by Gordon Jacob - again, I'd not heard of this one before, but I would think the Jacob's style would probably meet your criteria.

Finally, he mentions Jericho, for male voices only and band, by Chris Sansom, dating from 1978. Although in this case, it is possible that Sansom's musical language might not fit your requirements, being a bit too 'modern' (and not for SATB into the bargain of course).

Tragic, isn't it, that these sort of pieces just get left in the cupboard and forgotten?
 
Thanks for all the ideas.


We've now revised the project after having heard the "Requiem for a charred skull" which is a fantastic original work, and still is in a "classical form" (Requiem).

The Choir is happy with it so we'll probably do that one...
 

James Yelland

Well-Known Member
Yes, that is right. There are two interludes for band alone (as well as 'Blazon'). 'Consolation' slots in between 'Destruction' and 'Dedication', and is a slow melancholy tune, the main figure of which reappears in 'Dedication' sung by the chorus. 'Felicitation' slots in between 'Dedication' and 'Revelation', and is a brisk scherzo in triple time, the material of which reappears in a slower, legato guise during the 'sixth trumpet' section of 'Revelation'. Total time approx. 45 minutes. A fine work, and listening to it again for the first time in years, the influence of Belshazzar's Feast seems obvious - to me, anyway.
Rather late I know, as this thread began 15 years ago (!) but there is an audio performance of The Trumpets - complete with Consolation and Felicitation - on Youtube here:



None other than Peter Pears as the vocal soloist, which is interesting as the work is scored for a bass, and Pears was definitely a tenor, but if anything the words come over more clearly in this version than the very old one I've got with Owen Brannigan from yonks ago.

Thought people might be interested....
 

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