Ofsted report

Okiedokie of Oz

Active Member
W.Rimmer said:
It goes on a lot, and makes it seem as if lots of music is being taught, even though the kids aren't being shown anything of any use. Literacy and numeracy are moving towards having more structure and rigor, while in music "let it all hang out man" seems to be the approach.

This is a big problem. Education Qld has issued a strategic goal, referred to as the "2010" document. Basically, it claims, that by 2010, all education must be outcomes based, and usable in the real world. Yet, even when I did senior classroom music, we did score analysis. WHERE THE HECK DO YOU USE THAT IN THE REAL WORLD?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?

This is part of the reason i work so hard with the brass band, and I am am up in arms over the quality of the current Instrumental Music Program. They way they run it now (since my departure as a student) has basically denied any form of extra curricular music events excepts those in a similar stayle to those in schools. Brass players cannot play in brass bands, because they're told not to play cornets, or lower brass players read any other clef other than bass. Woodwind players get nothing, and string players.....well the best I've seen them organise is a small, semi-profesisonal ensemble, 2 violins, a viola, cello and a double bass.

As you can see, I have issues with my future employers regarding the way they're KILLING a once great thing!!! Call me selfish, but the brass band is suffering as a result. As our older players leave town, or ive up, we are slowly depleting our reserves of up and coming brass players. In 3-5 years time, I am scared my beloved band, to whom I owe my musical existance, will perish.
 

W.Rimmer

Member
Okiedokie of Oz said:
when I did senior classroom music, we did score analysis. WHERE THE HECK DO YOU USE THAT IN THE REAL WORLD?.

Well, preparing a test-piece springs to mind...but perhaps that doesn't count as the real world. :lol:
 
I am somewhat confused (no change there). You state that you were told just about to do your grade 4 to give up because you were 'so bad'. However you would have already done your grade 3 and were progressing to 4 so were improving!

Then when you were about to take grade 8, which you passed the head of music at your old school told you to give up? You then changed schools and you have gone from bad to good in weeks.

Am I missing something here :?[/quote]

Sorry :? The point that I was trying to make was that even though I have always been a 'dedicated' player Ive had teachers that did everything that they could to make me give up. I had the advantage that I played with a number of bands so seeked advice from a number pf people before making my own decision of whether to continue playing or give up.

I know from my own experience that not everyone is able to do this and so would probably give up on the advice of the teacher. The schools however would argue that all students had been given the 'opportunity' to learn an instrument. Surely this lack of encouragment would acheive the opposite of what is intended by giving all students between 7 and 11 the opportunity?? :? :(
 

andyp

Active Member
This kind of thing seems to change every few years, from "we must have music and the arts" to "we must concentrate on the three R's", depending on which way the political wind is blowing at the time. <rant> Unfortunately this is a symptom of the times we live in, in which nothing is any good unless it can be measured, and armies of people are employed measuring things who could be producing things. You can measure improvements in numeracy, because there are right and wrong answers, but music and other arts aren't measurable as easily, can't be set lovely targets to aim at to show how wonderful is the Government policy of the time, and hence are neglected. Never mind that music can help to reduce stress (unless you're a conductor :wink: ), and has other benefits to the mind and general well-being, is a social pursuit that can keep kids "off the streets", etc. You can't measure any of this,so it doesn't exist. </rant>
There are schools that promote music, my wife is teaching brass at our local school this afternoon, with instruments provided by the local brass band (Banks). This seems to be the way forward, for bands to co-operate with local schools. The schools get instruments and hopefully someone to teach (many brass students go into teaching), and the local band gets new players with some basic training. If the government (national, local, or regional) won't help, it's going to be down to us!
 

Okiedokie of Oz

Active Member
W.Rimmer said:
Okiedokie of Oz said:
when I did senior classroom music, we did score analysis. WHERE THE HECK DO YOU USE THAT IN THE REAL WORLD?.

Well, preparing a test-piece springs to mind...but perhaps that doesn't count as the real world. :lol:

For me it counts....but the type of analysis we did wasn't relevant. Why did James curnow use t he vibrophone in Legend in Brass?? Why is the final movement of Haslemere Suite a czardas? These are the types of questions and othger nonsense that were asked.

Also, why does someone playing for fun want to analyse the test piece score??? Wouldn't their own part be hard enough??
 

Chunky

Active Member
Cornet_player said:
Sorry :? The point that I was trying to make was that even though I have always been a 'dedicated' player Ive had teachers that did everything that they could to make me give up. I had the advantage that I played with a number of bands so seeked advice from a number pf people before making my own decision of whether to continue playing or give up.

I know from my own experience that not everyone is able to do this and so would probably give up on the advice of the teacher. The schools however would argue that all students had been given the 'opportunity' to learn an instrument. Surely this lack of encouragment would acheive the opposite of what is intended by giving all students between 7 and 11 the opportunity?? :? :(

I see your point Heather and all credit to you for sticking to it.

What I fail to comprehend is how people can be paid to educate, yet do all they can to discourage somebody who is making progress. Im my sipmle mind that is beyond believe and they should be fired.
 

Maestro

Active Member
Just slightly off topic, but it is in relation to Chunky's last post.

This morning I went to the local primary school where my stepchildren attend.
I had to complain to the head teacher about the homework that the children were given.
Their homework sheet said to add 'es' to these words to make them plural.

God
Tiger
Waiter

I'm sure that you can already see the fault in this.
When i questioned the head teacher about this, all she could say was that the teachers who set the homework don't have the time to check everything they set for homework.

As you said Chunky, sack the lot of them if they can't do their job properly :evil: :evil:

Rant over and aplogies for slightly off topic.
 

Crazysop

Member
Maestro said:
Just slightly off topic, but it is in relation to Chunky's last post.

This morning I went to the local primary school where my stepchildren attend.
I had to complain to the head teacher about the homework that the children were given.
Their homework sheet said to add 'es' to these words to make them plural.

God
Tiger
Waiter

I'm sure that you can already see the fault in this.
When i questioned the head teacher about this, all she could say was that the teachers who set the homework don't have the time to check everything they set for homework.

As you said Chunky, sack the lot of them if they can't do their job properly :evil: :evil:

Rant over and aplogies for slightly off topic.
Anyone can make a mistake!!!!!!!!! Even teachers.

In relation to school instrumental lessons, As a primary teacher I have had the opportunity to invite youngsters from my school to join my band's youth section. This has been really helpful in filling up our youth band. We had lots of interest as unlike the schools string tuition, our tuition costs the parents nothing! Great for us and great for them.
 

lynchie

Active Member
I was very lucky to get a teacher from the county music school coming to our school just as I started to play with my first band. Before that I had a cello player teaching me and I was considering giving up. I think if schools want to give music instrumental lessons to all children (and sweeping moves like that are not things I approve of) then they need to put more funding into local music authorities so that the teaching in the schools is of a high enough quality, and pupils learn more than twinkle twinkle on an old yamaha keyboard...
 

Dave Euph

Member
Maestro said:
As you said Chunky, sack the lot of them if they can't do their job properly :evil: :evil:

I think the headteacher had a point, the conditions in which teachers are having to work nowadays are getting harder and harder, and sacking teachers won't help at all ... more teachers is the answer to take the pressure off them and remove mistakes such as those.

But I digress from the original topic.
 

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