Mouthpiece size

JonnyShaw

Member
I use a DW 2XL these days for both my Eb & BBb playing, Im also started recently on a Tucci p84 which I really like, especially for the more orchestral music I play at uni.
 
Hi.

I'm currently playing my Eb with a dennis wick 3l. What do any other bass players use, and what do you find the differences to be for playing, sound etc?
I have a nice Perantucci.. use it as a doorstop and sometimes use it to knock nails in the wall when hanging pictures up, also use it to crack walnuts on christmas day.For playing BB bass I use an old Dennis Wick 1L.:cool:
 

Dfawn

New Member
hhaving played on a Denis Wick 2L for years I was finally persuaded by Andy Cat to experiment and am currently using a Mike Finn MF4 for Brass band as well as a Conn Helleberg for Larger Orchestral playing. The MF4 was specifically designed for EEb and F Tuba work and seems to blend well with the rest of the section (also all playing on various different Mike Finns).
Could you expand on your take on the MF4 on EEb? It’s the mp I’m looking into. How is it compared to a Wick2 or VB 24AW? How the sound /range?
 

pbirch

Active Member
there is actually nothing wrong with a wick 3l mouthpiece, although the size is similar to the Bach 24aw it is a different shape, I think we have a spare one in our band that I could give to your dad for you to try, if you want
 

pbirch

Active Member
the other mouthpiece of a comparable size is the Les Neish model from Alliance, Unfortunately I lost mine a few months ago, and there seem to be some production issues at the moment but it is a good mouthpiece
 

Jack E

Well-Known Member
@pbirch - re. the Alliance Les Neish mouthpiece, both Trevada Music and Alan Gregory are currently advertising these, though the note on Gregory's website says "low stock - please call".
HTH

Jack
 

2nd tenor

Well-Known Member
there is actually nothing wrong with a wick 3l mouthpiece, although the size is similar to the Bach 24aw it is a different shape
He’s right you know :) . Sometimes we overlook the solutions under our nose, that’s not to say that something else might suit better at some point but the DW3 is justifiably loved by many.

I studied with Patrick Harrild so I use a 24aw
What a privilege to be taught by such an expert. I wouldn’t have thought so but did Patrick dictate that a 24AW would be what you used?

Your: ‘Try everything and use what works’ has been a good guide for me.

For me the wide rim on the 24AW produced a mouthpiece who’s outside diameter didn’t fit comfortably on my face, overall it’s just too big. I did find a standard rim width Bach piece that fitted me nicely but its cup (18) was a bit too big for my chops to reliably control. It’s possibly just my inexperience but whilst very deep (A depth) cups produce an excellent tone they are noticeably harder to articulate with. Standard depth cups are more user friendly and still do the job just fine. The Wick 3 ticks the boxes for many folk, a wide enough cup for what range is needed that also isn’t overly deep and has a comfortable rim.
 

Vegasbound

Active Member
He’s right you know :) . Sometimes we overlook the solutions under our nose, that’s not to say that something else might suit better at some point but the DW3 is justifiably loved by many.



What a privilege to be taught by such an expert. I wouldn’t have thought so but did Patrick dictate that a 24AW would be what you used?

Your: ‘Try everything and use what works’ has been a good guide for me.

For me the wide rim on the 24AW produced a mouthpiece who’s outside diameter didn’t fit comfortably on my face, overall it’s just too big. I did find a standard rim width Bach piece that fitted me nicely but its cup (18) was a bit too big for my chops to reliably control. It’s possibly just my inexperience but whilst very deep (A depth) cups produce an excellent tone they are noticeably harder to articulate with. Standard depth cups are more user friendly and still do the job just fine. The Wick 3 ticks the boxes for many folk, a wide enough cup for what range is needed that also isn’t overly deep and has a comfortable rim.

Let’s say that most if not all Patrick’s students would have played a 24 aw as for the 18 well that used to be popular with BBb players, certainly in the forces bands

If the Wick 3 works for you then use it, they were developed with Stephen Wick Denis’s son who was a fine pro player before suffering a near fatal stroke back in the 1990’s if memory serves
 

2nd tenor

Well-Known Member
Let’s say that most if not all Patrick’s students would have played a 24 aw as for the 18 well that used to be popular with BBb players, certainly in the forces bands

If the Wick 3 works for you then use it, they were developed with Stephen Wick Denis’s son who was a fine pro player before suffering a near fatal stroke back in the 1990’s if memory serves
Well, you lives and you learns. I can see the 18 being more the size needed for a four valve BBb but it seems to me that there’s quite an overlap between the EEb and the BBb in terms of what size cups work on them. What mouthpieces were popular in the Forces Bands with the EEb players? I played a Bach 25 size for some time and that worked well if perhaps on the small side for speaking well (for me) through all the low range. Should one cross my path then I’d like to try a Bach 22 as a compromise (between 18 & 25), it’s probably a bit bigger than is needed but playing the 18 did help me improve my low (4th valve) range - Mouthpiece selection seems to be a complex mix of compromises, marginal gains, personal development and learning what you (as an individual) can, after practice, manage to do with the ‘new’ piece.

I didn’t know that Denis had a son or that his son was a very well thought of Tuba Player. As far as I can tell Stephen’s busy and in reasonable health. These links infer that anyway : Staff - Stephen Wick - Royal Academy of Music & https://uk.linkedin.com/in/stephen-wick-4b94123a .
 
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Vegasbound

Active Member
As Patrick taught at Kneller hall 24aw

Denis is best known now for his mouthpieces etc, many don’t know he was principal trombone of the LSO, and taught so many of the orchestral players working now
 
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