George Doughty

James Yelland

Well-Known Member
Well, here's what I found on the German version of Wikipedia, after I had clicked the 'translate' button:

George Doughty (b. 16 December 1918 in Dale Abbey, Derbyshire) is an English composer and tubist (I think that means a tuba player, not the member of some bizarre art movement). Already as a child he learned wind instruments and joined the Collingh Brass Band at the age of seven. At the age of nine he switched from E flat horn to euphonium. At the age of 12 he was already a soloist in the brass band. At the age of 14 he joined the Crosswell Colliery Band with his four-year-old brother and later the Derby Borough Police Band to gain more experience and acquire other playing techniques. The Derby Borough Police Band was briefly led by Harry Mortimer who complimented him by noting that he considered him one of the best euphonium players in Britain. In 1980 he was given the opportunity to study at the Valiviu College of Music.

I think you should take a lot of this with a pinch of salt. I don't know where Collingh for a start (probably nowhere), nor Crosswell (although I suppose they might be talking about Creswell Colliery). Also, if he was given the opportunity to study at the Valiviu College of Music (wherever that may be) at the age of 62, all I can say is he was a late developer - or at least, compared to his four year old brother. It's amazing what you can find on the internet, isn't it?

I did consult my copy of John Maines' 'Complete Compere Notes Guide' book published in 2007, but it turns out that it's incomplete, because there's no mention of Doughty at all. But given that this is a book which can find two pages to devote to Bohumir Kryl, 1.5 pages to Perry G Lowery and an entire page to David Wallace Reeves while Eric Ball and Philip Sparke, two of the band world's most prolific composers merit less than half a page each, this wasn't very surprising. As Elgar Howarth says in his foreword to the book: "this is a directory/manual like no other". Quite!

According to German Wikipedia Doughty also wrote Abbeydale Variations for euph and band, and Walking by the Deawent (probably Derwent) for trom and band as well. So I've learned something this evening anyway.

 
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Well, here's what I found on the German version of Wikipedia, after I had clicked the 'translate' button:

George Doughty (b. 16 December 1918 in Dale Abbey, Derbyshire) is an English composer and tubist (I think that means a tuba player, not the member of some bizarre art movement). Already as a child he learned wind instruments and joined the Collingh Brass Band at the age of seven. At the age of nine he switched from E flat horn to euphonium. At the age of 12 he was already a soloist in the brass band. At the age of 14 he joined the Crosswell Colliery Band with his four-year-old brother and later the Derby Borough Police Band to gain more experience and acquire other playing techniques. The Derby Borough Police Band was briefly led by Harry Mortimer who complimented him by noting that he considered him one of the best euphonium players in Britain. In 1980 he was given the opportunity to study at the Valiviu College of Music.

I think you should take a lot of this with a pinch of salt. I don't know where Collingh for a start (probably nowhere), nor Crosswell (although I suppose they might be talking about Creswell Colliery). Also, if he was given the opportunity to study at the Valiviu College of Music (wherever that may be) at the age of 62, all I can say is he was a late developer - or at least, compared to his four year old brother. It's amazing what you can find on the internet, isn't it?

I did consult my copy of John Maines' 'Complete Compere Notes Guide' book published in 2007, but it turns out that it's incomplete, because there's no mention of Doughty at all. But given that this is a book which can find two pages to devote to Bohumir Kryl, 1.5 pages to Perry G Lowery and an entire page to David Wallace Reeves while Eric Ball and Philip Sparke, two of the band world's most prolific composers merit less than half a page each, this wasn't very surprising. As Elgar Howarth says in his foreword to the book: "this is a directory/manual like no other". Quite!

According to German Wikipedia Doughty also wrote Abbeydale Variations for euph and band, and Walking by the Deawent (probably Derwent) for trom and band as well. So I've learned something this evening anyway.

Thank you SO much foright finding that. I had the pleasure of meeting him a couple of times; including a solo contest where I played Grandfather's Clock and he came out of the audience to talk to me; and once he joined Sir Harry Mortimer and I in conversation at a band contest somewhere (i'm still trawling through my notes trying to find the date). He was a lovely man.
 
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