Forgotten test pieces

this thread is pretty old - but half of these 'forgotten' pieces seem to have been used since!

my picks would have been "Pride of Race" (K. Wright)
or maybe "Freedom" (H. Bath) - the most played nationals piece of all time* and yet noone has ever heard of it. surely that's the ultimate forgotten test piece

* 3 times in '22, '47 and '73
 

dyl

Active Member
starperformer said:
this thread is pretty old
Aye! interesting reading back through it though. Particularly:

BoozyBTrom said:
Couple of other forgotte greats.

Labour and Love
and the Judges of the Secret Court (not heard it in years)

and Life Divine
 

nickjones

Active Member
Freedom is a real monster piece ( I think it's around the 9 or 10 min mark ) had a look at the set and score the other day , bright yellow ( and old and smelly parts) still quite small print for 1929 but a real monster..last used in 1987 at the Open..
Seascapes is another brilliant test...never used since '88 Nationals

pieces never to be used again Buxton Orr(ful) Caledonian Suite...didn't hear a scottish tune in this "Masterpiece" :(
 

brassneck

Active Member
- here's a test-piece that has been truly forgotten (and I would love to get a recording of) ... Ciaccona Seria (Henk Badings) [1985]. I must admit that I do like the piece.
 

Nigel Hall

Supporting Member
Two of my faves that never seem to get played these days are Gareth Wood's excellent Introduction & Allegro and Hinemoa. I think it's about time we heard them again.
 
Andrew R said:
What about Saga of the North, Scena Sinfonica and Oliver Cromwell.........and what about all of those Vinter pieces...James Cook, Spectrum, Variations on a 9th etc!. Even some of the early Gregson works like Plantagenets and Connotations rarely see the light of day today.....

As for Life Divine....that can stay in the library for another 25years as far as I'm concrened (personal choice!).

Andrew R
Redbridge Brass

:)
Some of these are quite popular over here. Even tho I'm quite young I've played Variations on a 9th, The Plantagenets, and Connotations, and that James Cook piece.
 

brassneck

Active Member
Nigel Hall said:
Two of my faves that never seem to get played these days are Gareth Wood's excellent Introduction & Allegro and Hinemoa. I think it's about time we heard them again.
- Tombstone Arizona by the same composer was really enjoyable in it's day too!
 

Jan H

Moderator
Staff member
Indeed, here as well. Spectrum is the set piece in first section this year. It has been played as an own choice as well, as have the Plantagenets and Connotations. Variations on a Ninth has also been a set piece at the Belgian nationals a couple of years ago. Hinemoa was the set piece for the 3rd section in Kerkrade last year. Smithills School played it there.

- here's a test-piece that has been truly forgotten (and I would love to get a recording of) ... Ciaccona Seria (Henk Badings) [1985]. I must admit that I do like the piece.
As far as I know, Ciaccona Seria was originally written for fanfare orchestra.
Henk Badings is an extremely interesting composer. Before starting to compose, he studied engineering, so he had a very good knowledge of the physics behind sound. He composed some pieces in a 31 tonal system (31 tones in an octave, instead of the 12 tones in or usual system; this way one can make much more complex chords). He died in 1987, and he lived in a little village very close to my own, just accross the Dutch border.
Unfortunately, his music (symphonic or wind band) isn't played that much any more... Some of his most famous pieces for wind and fanfare band are Images and Sagas
 

GJG

Well-Known Member
Straightmute said:
Hymn at Sunrise hasn't been heard much since despite being generally well recieved in Cambridge.
Indeed. I would very much like to see (hear?) it being used, along with the same writer's "The Beacons" - another piece that has hardly been played since it was used at the qualifiers around 15(?) years ago.

I had hoped that the excellent YBS "Alpha and Omega" CD would generate more interest in Steadman-Allen's work, however not much sign of it yet ...
 

BbBill

Supporting Member
brassneck said:
- Tombstone Arizona by the same composer was really enjoyable in it's day too!
I remember playing Tombstone at NYBBS, some 10 or so years ago, cant remember how it went like tho!
 

Anno Draconis

Well-Known Member
starperformer said:
or maybe "Freedom" (H. Bath) - the most played nationals piece of all time* and yet noone has ever heard of it. surely that's the ultimate forgotten test piece

* 3 times in '22, '47 and '73
Also used at the Open in 87/88ish I think? I'm not especially keen on it, nor Lorenzo which was exhumed for Pontins last year - let's not hear that turgid old potboiler again. Put it in the same skip as Scena Sinfonica, Life Divine, Scena Sinfonica and Judges of the flippin' Secret Court. Oh, and James Cook, and Entertainments.

I would like to hear Seascapes again though, or The New Jerusalem. Kenilworth isn't bad, and I'm quite keen on Variations on The Shining River by Edmund Rubbra, which is harder than you'd think. Also I haven't heard Festival Music for ages, very listenable and an object lesson in how to construct old-fashioned traditional harmony and counterpoint. Triumphant Rhapsody would be worth resurrecting and a couple of old European tests - Morley Calvert's Introduction, Elegy and Caprice and Paul Huber's Symphonic Music.
 

alks

Member
A few years ago someone in my band dug out and dusted off a piece called "saturday market overture " or morning overture or something sounding like that, apprently an early 90s test piece...but ive no idea what level or who its by.?

Either way, definetly completely forgotten never to be heard of again........

alks
 

brassneck

Active Member
alks said:
A few years ago someone in my band dug out and dusted off a piece called "saturday market overture " or morning overture or something sounding like that, apprently an early 90s test piece...but ive no idea what level or who its by.?

Either way, definetly completely forgotten never to be heard of again........

alks
:confused: by any chance is it ....
ANTHONY HEDGES (1931- ) was educated at Keble College, Oxford and pursued a teaching career at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama and then, from 1963 to 1995, at Hull University. He was, and is, a prolific composer in all forms, much of his output being suitable for amateurs and/or maintaining the best traditions of British light music. Heigham Sound, Cleveland, Holiday Overture and (for brass) Saturday Market are examples of the British light overture, while An Ayrshire Serenade, Three Dance Miniatures, Four Breton Sketches, British Folk Song Suite, Four Miniature Dances For My Children, Scenes From the Humber, Kingston Sketches (which depict Hull, of course) and, for strings, Divertimento, formerly styled Four Diversions, are examples of the light concert suite.
http://www.musicweb-international.com/garlands/101.htm
 

KMJ Recordings

Supporting Member
That'll be the one.

It was used with Music for Greenwich as a two part test piece in the early 80s for the Youth Section Area IIRC.
 

Brian

Member
Some I remember playing, conducting and or listening to that I enjoyed are:
Blenheim. Arthur Butterworth
Chorale and Variations. Leighton Lucas
California Legend. Bruce Broughton
Fusions. Howard Blake
Galaxies. Carl Davies/Ray Farr
Henry V.Overture. Vaughan-Williams/ Roy Douglas
Jodrell Bank. Peter Yorke
Royal Parks. George Lloyd
Symphonic Music. Paul Huber
Symphonic Suite for Brass. Leighton Lucas
Three Saints. Goff Richards
The Undaunted. Eric Ball

Some I never want to see again are:
Caledonian Suite. Buxton Orr
Cordell Suite. Helen Perkin
Crown Cavalcade. P.Beechfield Carver
Festival Overture. Henry Geehl
Festival Suite. Stuart Johnson
Flowers of the Forest. Richard Rodney-Bennett
Music for Brass Band. Martin Dalby
Sea Dogs. Maurice Johnstone
Three Inventions. Pi Scheffer/Albert Jakeway
White Company. Norman Richardson
 
Couldn't agree more with you on that one. Triumphant Rhapsody is an absolute corker. Love playing it, and audinences seem to enjoy hearing it (People who choose the test pieces, pay heed...)

Another one I also like, but I'm not sure where or when its been used or, even if it is classed as a test piece is Endeavour. Can't remember the composer but I remember having a recording on tape years back of a massed band playing it at a concert. Absolutely FAB! Never played it, but would love to get my teeth into what sounds to be a decent bass trombone part.
 

andyp

Active Member
One of my favourites that's never heard now - "Three Musketeers" by George Hespe (?), good to play and listen to (slow movement in 5/4, good test for lower sections).
I vote for Henry V, too, cracking.
 

Charmed

Active Member
Highams said:
What ever happened to these test pieces, should they remain forgotten ?
any more out there ?

Embassy Suite, Allan Street
Joyful Noise & Pride of Youth, Gordon Jacob
Blackfriars, Cundell
Lorenzo, Keighly
The Frogs, Bantock.

CB
Since this original post in May 2003, Lorenzo was the test piece for Pontins 2005 1st Section. So, although fairly old, it is obviously not a 'forgotten' test piece. Never heard of the others though! :biggrin:
 

AndyCat

Active Member
HUDDSBASSBONE said:
Couldn't agree more with you on that one. Triumphant Rhapsody is an absolute corker. Love playing it, and audinences seem to enjoy hearing it (People who choose the test pieces, pay heed...)

Another one I also like, but I'm not sure where or when its been used or, even if it is classed as a test piece is Endeavour. Can't remember the composer but I remember having a recording on tape years back of a massed band playing it at a concert. Absolutely FAB! Never played it, but would love to get my teeth into what sounds to be a decent bass trombone part.
This is the Sparke Endeavour I think, on a 1988 Nationals Gala Concert recording. Great piece! Was used at Pontins 1st or 2nd section I think in the 90's.
There's also a Langford Endeavour, but I don't think this is the one you mean.


As for other pieces, what about Beacons (R.S.Allen) or Odin (A.Butterworth)?
 
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