Burry Port Band in trouble with the local council

yr_epa

Member
This happened to my last band Harlech. We were using an old Chapel at the time and a complaint was made by a person who spent his summer holidays (he moved to somewhere over the Winter) living in the house very close by.

Enviromental Health came with their microphone type thing to record our loudness..... how i wish i could have asked the conductor if we could play with mutes throughout that rehearsal!

Weeks later, evicition note - we had 1 month to get out! Luckily for the band they did get a new rehearsal room.
 

JayneSop

Member
B'aht a band said:
This made "The Sun" over here in Belfast today, and I quote....


"A champion brass band has been told to quit rehearsals in its new hall - after a neighbour moaned to the council about noise in Burry Port, South Wales."

Now, a neighbour, as in singular..... That is absolutely ludicrous and that the council/environmental health officer have agreed with the one (probably old and maybe slightly insane) moaner. Honestly, these are the sort of people who write in to Woman's Weekly or Readers Digest saying "a funny thing happened to me on the way to the shops....." Grrrrrr!!!!! :mad:

Andy, spouting away on his soapbox
I must say its amazing how this story is capturing the media attention. Thanks for everyone's support.

I'm not 100% sure that this is offical, but I think we've been given a further 70 days to reduce the sound. If anyone out there has got good soundproofing tips for us, please pass them on.

Thanks

Jayne Thomas

Burry Port Band
 
seem to remember something similar not sure if it was a brass band.

Result was the band had rehearsed years before resident had moved into the house. Therefore the band room should have shown on her searches and judge sided with the band. Should never have gone that far. minority spioling it for majority again.

Sond proofing tips :-- Buy the old bird an i pod for christmas falls within 70 days, perhaps you could do a christmas concert to raise the money. and invite her of course as the benefactor!!
 
JayneSop said:
I must say its amazing how this story is capturing the media attention. Thanks for everyone's support.

I'm not 100% sure that this is offical, but I think we've been given a further 70 days to reduce the sound. If anyone out there has got good soundproofing tips for us, please pass them on.

Thanks

Jayne Thomas

Burry Port Band

Egg boxes! You can't go wrong with egg boxes. The cardboard half-dozen holder ones, not the crappy polystrene stuff.

Andy
 

Anno Draconis

Well-Known Member
B'aht a band said:
Egg boxes! You can't go wrong with egg boxes. The cardboard half-dozen holder ones, not the crappy polystrene stuff.

Andy

Deffo. Can't beat 'em, what you need is a local battery farm in need of favourable publicity.
Incidentally, deadening your bandroom with egg boxes is a great way to improve the band's playing.
 

topeuph

Member
Egg Box's

We aren't allowed to use egg boxes, as wew've been told by the Council that they're a fire hazzard. Doh!
 

NeilW

Member
A layer of Rockwool loft insulation perhaps? (Its much nicer to work with than fiberglass!) Supporting wires across the walls to hold it in place. It is completley fireproof, I believe, so should keep them happy on that front.

Are there single glazed windows? Secondary glazing with plasic...

Might actually be worth asking the council environmental health people what they would recommend - your local councillor(s) would also be good contacts.

Good luck.

Neil.
 

fartycat

Member
topeuph said:
We aren't allowed to use egg boxes, as wew've been told by the Council that they're a fire hazzard. Doh!

You can fireproof anything with Flamebar - used in theatres. S1WA2 is the stuff I think.
 

RonBarnes

Member
Problem with soundproofing your bandroom is that if you're not very careful the place will sound so dead that you won't even want to play there!
Buy the old bat some pink fur-lined ear defenders for Christmas!
 

brassneck

Active Member
RonBarnes said:
Problem with soundproofing your bandroom is that if you're not very careful the place will sound so dead that you won't even want to play there!
Buy the old bat some pink fur-lined ear defenders for Christmas!

- it's sometimes the case that 'dead' acoustics can work in a band's favour ... It didn't affect Sun Life (Stanshawe) Band's sound in any negative way when they were around!
 

Jan H

Moderator
Staff member
brassneck said:
- it's sometimes the case that 'dead' acoustics can work in a band's favour ... It didn't affect Sun Life (Stanshawe) Band's sound in any negative way when they were around!
I've never been there myself, but I've been told that Brass Band Willebroek's bandroom is also as dead as can be...
 

iggmeister

Member
brassneck said:
- it's sometimes the case that 'dead' acoustics can work in a band's favour ... It didn't affect Sun Life (Stanshawe) Band's sound in any negative way when they were around!

When I played in there it didn't seem that dead to me. Just a basement of some grotty old Bristol house. It was too small for me.

Best rehearsal room I've played in is Fodens - really hard work in there.

I think rehearsal rooms are one of the most important factors in improving any band.

Igg
 

KMJ Recordings

Supporting Member
There's something that needs clarifying here - soundproofing and acoustics are not the same thing. Soundproofing is the process that reduces the transmission of noise through barriers (which is what you want).

Firstly, eggboxes will do nothing - all they do is absorb a small amount of mid to high frequency sound.

I'm afraid I know little about soundproofing in any formal sense - my new room is being designed by people who do - but some of the posts about double glazing and rockwool are spot on.

The 'secret' to soundproofing walls is mass - hence the use of rockwool sheets (I'm led to believe that although they make 'acoustic' products, the difference over standard rockwall isn't sufficient to justify the price markup), and mutliple layers of plasterboard....

The problem is that you may not be able to make significant building alterations?
 

brassneck

Active Member
iggmeister said:
When I played in there it didn't seem that dead to me. Just a basement of some grotty old Bristol house. It was too small for me.... Igg

"What was the bandroom like?
[size=-1]The band's club was a converted & large annex to a church. The bandroom consisted of 2 rooms and a hallway of the club. Entering through a large wooden door, a visitor would enter the hallway, with walls covered in band memorabilia, distracted by which, they would then hit their knee or leg against a drum or box of music stands left in the way in this cluttered place. To the right was the library & equipment store where players congregated for a chat before rehearsals - that's why all the stuff was in the hallway. The visitor having gone through this short hallway would enter the main rehearsal room, which was very small indeed. This room had been, when it was a functioning church, the room where the choir would change prior to the service - this gives you a rough idea that it wasn't spacious. To the rear of the main practice room, where the basses sat, was a small flight of stairs leading out the back of the bandroom to a tiny patio, so to speak, with access to toilets, & the club itself.[/size]

[size=-1]The club was quite big. It had 3 bars, a snooker room, a lounge, and a ballroom. It also had committee rooms and a small cellar for lovely beer. The club was like any working men's type club that there ever was. But let's get back to talking about the bandroom.[/size]

[size=-1]The bandroom had for many years been lined with sound-proof materials held together by the ugliest zinc-steel mesh ever. It looked terrible! People had tried to improve its appearance but it was just too difficult to decorate nicely. In 1990, the band moved out for 2 weeks while the room was refurbished to make it a brighter place to work in.[/size] [size=-1]Even after this refurbishment the bandroom never lost its one true endearing feature - it had the world's worst acoustic - even someone with a fine beautiful sound would sound in our bandroom like they were playing Roy Castle's rubber hose & funnel. Many players, when playing there for the first time, would blow a few notes then immediately spend the next few minutes looking at their instrument intently, seeing if they'd left a cloth down the bell or that a spittle cork hadn't accidentally fallen out. It was always funny to those watching this reoccurring act. Even though this disturbed the ego of many new players they soon found out that the bandroom's acoustic forced you to work incredibly hard to produce a sweet, deep, sound of any sort. Once outside that room, wow! WB Hargreaves had introduced the bucket mouthpiece much earlier and had, as other band conductors had done, worked on producing a great sounding band. This bandroom was truly a major contributor to why Stanshawe & Sun Life had one of the best brass band sounds around"[/size]

http://www.stanshawe.fsnet.co.uk/faq.htm

:wink: :tup
 

NeilW

Member
KMJ Recordings said:
Firstly, eggboxes will do nothing - all they do is absorb a small amount of mid to high frequency sound.

I'm afraid I know little about soundproofing in any formal sense - my new room is being designed by people who do - but some of the posts about double glazing and rockwool are spot on.

The 'secret' to soundproofing walls is mass - hence the use of rockwool sheets (I'm led to believe that although they make 'acoustic' products, the difference over standard rockwall isn't sufficient to justify the price markup), and mutliple layers of plasterboard....

The problem is that you may not be able to make significant building alterations?

Wickes do Rockwool loft insulation quite cheaply (if you weren't so far away, you could have the couple of rolls that are leftovers in my loft from many years ago!)

I would have thought that eggboxes would have affected the accoustic of the room by reducing sound reflection, but you're right they'll do nothing about stopping the sound getting out!

I was thinking of the kind of things they do inside HiFi speakers with accoustic deadening stuff - and I seem to remember some DIY designs using fiberglass (yuk!)

Good luck (again)

Neil
(Snug in a house that has Rockwool loft and cavity wall insulation - which cut the oil heating bill very significantly! :clap: )
 

KMJ Recordings

Supporting Member
NeilW said:
I would have thought that eggboxes would have affected the accoustic of the room by reducing sound reflection, but you're right they'll do nothing about stopping the sound getting out!

They do - but not very well, and not at frequecies that would really concern Brass Bands ;)

Fibreglass can alledgedly be used, but you have to take care that it's covered with material that's impermeable to fibres (as does rockwool if it's outside a cavity), but it's generally not recommended due to the potential health problems.
 

Jan H

Moderator
Staff member
NeilW said:
I would have thought that eggboxes would have affected the accoustic of the room by reducing sound reflection, but you're right they'll do nothing about stopping the sound getting out!
I don't much about buidling acoustics, but I guess it's more or less similar to car acoustics and some parallels can be used?.

If you have a noise source inside a closed cavity, the noise inside is amplified by the reflections from the walls. So if you put absorbing material on the walls, the nosie inside is reduced, but also the nosie that is transmitted through the walls. For instance in the engine compartment of most cars, you will find absorbing material on the firewall (=the metal plate between engine and passenger compartment), underneath the bonnet and on top of the engine. This absorbs part of the engine noise, and therefore reduces part of the radiated noise (to the outside and to the passenger compartment).

Then to further reduce the noise inside the car, there is acoustic insulation material inside the passenger compartment (on the floor and behind the dashboard) and absorption material on the roof.

But the most important of all is SEALING, if there is only the smallest gap somewhere between the engine and passenger compartment, all other noise countermeasures are practically useless!

(but I have the feeling we are getting a bit off-topic with regard to the original subject)
 

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