Baritone switching to Bass for new band?

B.Portas

Member
Thanks for the advice, but with some guidance, I have been steered away from taking up bass, to euphonium. I got a great deal on a older euph, and an offer of lessons, so perhaps tuba may be a venture for the future.
 

cockaigne

Member
Worth remembering that the euphonium is a member of the tuba family, so a lot of the advice you've heard here still applies - have fun :)
 

B.Portas

Member
In all honesty, learning to play flashy solos on euph is probably good for me, to get it out of my system while I'm still new to brass. I went through the same phase learning guitar, trying as many flashy things as possible, but now I prefer to sit back and play rhythm or simple chords, or add to the music in more subtle, textural ways.

Besides, nothing wrong with wanting to further your technique, and as many have said, the advice here will prepare me if the opportunity to play tuba arises, when I'm a bit more experienced.
 

Aussie Tuba

Member
I'd echo most of the above. Stick to EEb to begin with - it's far more forgiving than that it's larger cousin. BBb is, in my opinion one of the most challenging seats in the band - very good BBb Bass players are few and far between.

Sound is everything. Make sure you fill the instrument. I was once advised to blow through the instrument, not into it and I think it's a good a bit of advice as I've ever had.

Remember bass playing is a team game, perhaps more so than any other section in the band, apart from perhaps percussion.

Golden Rule - Always blame the Euphs. You're not dragging, they're rushing!
I agree with Bass playing being a team game. also blowing through the instrument. Great advice!!
 

Aussie Tuba

Member
there is no real excuse for practising the tuba to be boring, there is a wealth of great music out there for the instruments, one slight problem is that much of it is in bass clef, but if you can get your head round it, its great. look at Oystein Baadsviks website, or google tuba music and you will find it.
Long tones are boring and actually not that helpful. I heard Roger Webster describe them as preparing for running race by standing still. Baadsvik has asked what happens if instead of playing long tones, you play a tune (he suggested camp town races I think)? your mind and your fingers get involved in the warm up process too. I'll add one further celebrity comment that has helped my playing on the tuba, Patrick Harrild, on a Youtube masterclass, said that "…you have to be big and brave, and blow the thing'.
Always aim for a beautiful sound, and if you have played 2nd Baritone, the tuba lines will not be that unfamiliar. Good luck
Long notes are always a good way of building a good sound. Long notes might not help cornet players but I have never regreted using them to build a good solid sound. Use of a practice mute may also help with sound in both Euph and Bass.
 

pbirch

Active Member
Long notes are always a good way of building a good sound. Long notes might not help cornet players but I have never regreted using them to build a good solid sound. Use of a practice mute may also help with sound in both Euph and Bass.
Oystein Baadsvik would suggest that though this is received wisdom, it is actually a myth. If all you want to do is play long tones, knock yourself out, if you want to be a musical player - play music. Playing tunes will develop a good sound just as effectively as playing monotones (monotonously)
 

Aussie Tuba

Member
Oystein Baadsvik would suggest that though this is received wisdom, it is actually a myth. If all you want to do is play long tones, knock yourself out, if you want to be a musical player - play music. Playing tunes will develop a good sound just as effectively as playing monotones (monotonously)
My Practice regimine does include other things besides long tones. But they were good enough to get me into the Best contesting Band in Australia and to play with them in the Australian open in 2011 on the Gold Coast and win the test.
Good sounds are the foundation of any playing and if using long tones help a plyer to get there who are you to critisise something that worked.
 

mikelyons

Supporting Member
Long notes help with breathing, intonation, tuning, counting, posture and a whole host of other benefits. You shouldn't spend your entire practise time doing them, but they are worth doing a few minutes on them every time you practise. If you spend all your time twittering about, you might improve your technique, but not your sound. Any fool can flutter valves!
 

Aussie Tuba

Member
Long notes help with breathing, intonation, tuning, counting, posture and a whole host of other benefits. You shouldn't spend your entire practise time doing them, but they are worth doing a few minutes on them every time you practise. If you spend all your time twittering about, you might improve your technique, but not your sound. Any fool can flutter valves!
100% agree
 

pbirch

Active Member
My Practice regimine does include other things besides long tones. But they were good enough to get me into the Best contesting Band in Australia and to play with them in the Australian open in 2011 on the Gold Coast and win the test.
Good sounds are the foundation of any playing and if using long tones help a plyer to get there who are you to critisise something that worked.
I have not criticised your playing, your sound or your achievements, and would not dream of doing so. It is quite outrageous that you suggest that a view that differs from your own implies such a criticism.
When I learned to play, my teacher used to rap me across the knuckles if I played a wrong note, he used to say that if was good enough for him it was good enough for me.
now, long note playing is the received wisdom, it is the way we have always done it without question, is it possible that other things contribute yo the production of a good sound - such as playing tunes, whether hymn tunes, etudes, Bach cello suites, pop songs etc, and that in playing them you form the basis of a good sound as well as getting fingers to work, the mind and ears attuned to the music. I do agree with Mike when he's says it is not just about fluttering valves, it is about purposeful practice and playing. PLaying tunes also helps with breathing, intonation tuning and counting.
Challenging the received wisdom is always difficult, but it not a criticism of anyone
 

Aussie Tuba

Member
if you want to be a musical player - play music. Playing tunes will develop a good sound just as effectively as playing monotones (monotonously)
I guess I took playing monotonously and if you want to be a musical player as critisism. If I am wrong I apolagise , Sure sounds like critisism to me following my post.
 

Aussie Tuba

Member
long note playing is the received wisdom, it is the way we have always done it without question, is it possible that other things contribute yo the production of a good sound - such as playing tunes, whether hymn tunes, etudes, Bach cello suites, pop songs etc, and that in playing them you form the basis of a good sound as well as getting fingers to work, the mind and ears attuned to the music. I do agree with Mike when he's says it is not just about fluttering valves, it is about purposeful practice and playing. PLaying tunes also helps with breathing, intonation tuning and counting.
Challenging the received wisdom is always difficult, but it not a criticism of anyone
I agree with all the above, Exept Challanging time honoured methods.( received Wisdom) But I was taught with long notes building the foundation for all the other things. including scale exersizes that move the fingers. and practicing difficult test peice passages.
Without good foundation all the rest will not sound as good.
 
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Simes

Supporting Member
It's all very simple to sort out which instrument is right for you.

Lager Drinker who gets 'squiffy' on two pints - Euphonium
Lager-Top Drinker - Baritone
Snowball - Tenor Horn
Larger with a Meths top - EEb Bass (counts as a cocktail)
16 pints of bitter and can still play 'Bass in a Ballroom' without needing a wee - BBb Bass.
 

Tubby

Member
In order to play any type of note you need to practice them, so if you want to be able to play the lowest note possible on a EEb or BBb you're not going to do it by going no lower than a C, the same applies to doing 4, 8, or 12 bar phrases these are achieved by doing long notes, hymm tune playing etc.

One thing I always do and encourage others to do is to push yourself further if you want to get better.
 
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