A Level Results Day

Pythagoras

Active Member
Pleased with the results of my pupils. The point about percentages going up because people drop out after AS is certainly true, I find this every year, and to quite a significant effect.

As for information being more available etc, in a lot of subjects this won't do any good, as you have all the information anyway, the exams are about interpreting that information given the questions. This is particularly true in non-coursework subjects.
 

Kjata

Member
What poeple are annoyed about is their good grades being dragged through the mud, and the news is basically saying 'these people aren't that clever to get these grades, the exams must be easy' and I, as well as hundreds of other A level students are incredibly frustrated and lost for words about that.

I also have just looked at the news at found this: "Exam chiefs have suggested it may be time to "crank up the standard" of A-levels after a record number of students learned they had scored top grades"

Discuss!
 

RamasII

Member
I think the A2 performance was marked a little harshly, though![/quote]


Yes so do I...all of my pupils gained the exact same mark for their recitial....hmmm...think thats going back!
 

sparkly

New Member
Pleased with the results of my pupils. The point about percentages going up because people drop out after AS is certainly true, I find this every year, and to quite a significant effect.

As for information being more available etc, in a lot of subjects this won't do any good, as you have all the information anyway, the exams are about interpreting that information given the questions. This is particularly true in non-coursework subjects.
Also many do not let students continue to A2 unless they have at least a D in the subject at AS.
 

mikelyons

Supporting Member
Maybe it's because it was the last of the old syllabus and they want people to think the new one is better/harder? The practical is the one thing they can mark hard and get away with - to an extent.
 

PeterBale

Moderator
Staff member
What's the point of a system that doesn't discriminate?

Discuss ;)
I was watching an interesting feature on the news the other morning regarding the benefits or otherwise of a university education, when set against the costs incurred etc.

The point was made that with the pressure to increase the proportion of students going into higher education, there are some who are in effect finding themselves out of their depth. Whereas having a degree used to be seen as a real asset, it does seem to have been more than a little devalued when we see the state of the new graduates on the current programmes with the companies I work with, and those are the ones who stuck with the courses and didn't drop out!

I certainly wouldn't want to say that exams are necessarily easier than they were, but I would definitely question a system that produces so many top grades that it is difficult for prospective employers/educational establishments to separate one from another.

Back in the dark ages, when I took my A-levels, the norm was either 3 or 4 subjects, and a place at a good university would often be available with an offer of an A and two Bs or similar.

There are now so many students coming out with 5 or more A's that it must be a nightmare for those selectors, hence the desire to find a better and more useful test, or reverting to the old-style university entrance exams and interviews.
 

imthemaddude

Active Member
A lot of people don't know that exam boards can change the grade boundaries. A botton A one year could have been a top B the year before. The government keep setting teachers new initiatives to make them better teachers so may be that is the answer or more of entering kids when they are ready..when we took the old style A levels we took them at the end of 2 years regardless of whether we were ready or not. Nowadays they can spread them out more and take some early etc. There are more A levels to suit more needs now, same with GCSEs. My kids don't stand a chance of passing Geography but they will be more than capable with the new Leisure and tourism. This year our kids are leaving with upto 4 GCSEs in ICT too which we didn't get the chance to do ten years ago. Lots of factors but I also agree with many of the comments above. Well done to the kids though they still have to work hard to get them.
 

ploughboy

Active Member
We've found our A2 performance grades were extremely low this year, and having sat in on one that got a 'U' I wondered what our examiner wanted. . He'd done a great job on grade 7 pieces, and knew his stuff about the music too. . .
 

Getzonica

Active Member
A lot of people don't know that exam boards can change the grade boundaries. A botton A one year could have been a top B the year before.
Apparently exam boards can even change the grade boundaries even after all the papers have been marked! Sounds a bit strange to me....
 
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