£1m for a brass band

razmabaz

New Member
WOW....! What a read. Taken me 4 lunchtimes!

I have to say I enjoyed the shows (warts and all). Well Done everybody - knockers included. Why do I say that?

Well, after a VERY long gap (38 years) I joined a music school, got playing again about a year ago. Now, I'm moving on to a local brass band. My wife sat down and watched all three episodes and now realises what it's all about - from the youngsters to the oldsters. The enjoyment is immense both listening and participating. I think DCB did a good job airing their washing in public. Did they know how it would end for them - doubt it? Frankly, I don't care, they did what they thought best at the time and I applaud them for it.

So, funny way to start posting here but I couldn't resist it!
 

James Yelland

Well-Known Member
Idly browsing old threads, I came across this one from 12 years ago. I'd forgotten about Band for Britain and the story of Dinnington Colliery Band. At the time, a point was made by some posters that the value of the band being featured in a TV programme would be judged by how well they fared in the future. Looking at its website, and also its contest results, it seems they've done very well indeed.

The thread later drifts off topic a bit, talking about how to raise the profile of brass bands and the role of the BFBB (later renamed BBE) and my eye was caught by this quote:

Most years I go to the Open in Symphony Hall... Nobody outside the hall has any idea that some of the country's finest (mostly) amateur musicians are performing 400 yards away inside the hall. There's a job for the BFBB, right there... get yer ass out in the square, book one of the Grand Shield bands (or the National Youth Champions, or something) to play to the crowds outside, I've thought of those in 5 minutes while I'm eating my lunch, with a few weeks planning and thought imagine what could be done to get bands into the consciousness of the public.

And like lightning, twelve years later, it happened, albeit at the European Championships, organised by BBE. Better late than never!
 

Jack E

Well-Known Member
Idly browsing old threads, I came across this one from 12 years ago. I'd forgotten about Band for Britain and the story of Dinnington Colliery Band. At the time, a point was made by some posters that the value of the band being featured in a TV programme would be judged by how well they fared in the future. Looking at its website, and also its contest results, it seems they've done very well indeed.

The thread later drifts off topic a bit, talking about how to raise the profile of brass bands and the role of the BFBB (later renamed BBE) and my eye was caught by this quote:

And like lightning, twelve years later, it happened, albeit at the European Championships, organised by BBE. Better late than never!
That's a very good point, which reminded me of the number of times I've seen videos on Youtube where anything from a solo performer to a full blown orchestra started playing in a street, a sqaure or a shopping area, and people gathered round to listen - and I'd bet that many of them had never seen music performed live before, and never thought "I wonder if I could do that?"

My earliest contact with live music was when I was about 7, and the Sally Army band from the local Citadel came round our street on Sunday mornings. But, when they played 'Onward Christian Soldiers' or the like, to them it wasn't just 'a tune' - or even 'a tune to which they knew the words'; they were putting heart and soul into it, because to them it was a rallying cry, an anthem, and it was expressing their sincerely held beliefs. The sheer enthusiasm of their performance just blew me away, and I've never forgotten it. And who better to express that enthusiasm for music, in public, than young players?
With best regards,
Jack
 

trumpetb

New Member
That's a very good point, which reminded me of the number of times I've seen videos on Youtube where anything from a solo performer to a full blown orchestra started playing in a street, a square or a shopping area, and people gathered round to listen - and I'd bet that many of them had never seen music performed live before, and never thought "I wonder if I could do that?"

My earliest contact with live music was when I was about 7, and the Sally Army band from the local Citadel came round our street on Sunday mornings. But, when they played 'Onward Christian Soldiers' or the like, to them it wasn't just 'a tune' - or even 'a tune to which they knew the words'; they were putting heart and soul into it, because to them it was a rallying cry, an anthem, and it was expressing their sincerely held beliefs. The sheer enthusiasm of their performance just blew me away, and I've never forgotten it. And who better to express that enthusiasm for music, in public, than young players?
With best regards,
Jack
I think that is an immensely important point Jack about the enthusiasm of the players.

As an old geezer I have seen many times gifted and premier players say that a player should form in their head a tonal concept of what he or she wants to sound like and then that sound has a chance of emerging from the bell.

I myself know that I can modulate and adapt the tone that I create with changing my tonal concept and can adapt my playing style to the instrument being played using various techniques. Different instruments play differently and may require a different approach to playing them to extract from them all they have to offer.

Chet Baker once said that he abandoned carrying a Flugel, saying that he can make his trumpet sound like a Flugel whenever he wants and I dont doubt that he could.

We brass players have at our disposal a huge range of tonal colours that we can exploit if we choose to.

Our own Bruce Chidester has explained much the same regarding how to approach playing a Flugel in his excellent post How to play a Flugel Horn.

The way we approach playing the instrument defines and modulates the tones we produce and in your example of the Sally Army Band when you say they put their heart and soul into it I believe they were doing the same thing as Chet perhaps without realising that this is what they were doing in that piece, he always put his soul into his instrument and the Sally Army band I am sure did the same and the performance was as captivating for you as Chets performances were for so many of his fans.

These are the things that inspire listeners to return and in some cases inspires them to learn an instrument and I feel privileged to be part of a community that can be so influential.

As for young players I agree they can inspire without doubt, but we oldies can do so too, this old man is guilty of having inspired youngsters many times to take up an instrument.

The instrument reaches into the listeners soul if we play from our soul and we transport the listener to a better place. In this activity I am just the driver and the instrument is the vehicle and the music is the road, it is where we transport the listener to and the fact that we can do it, that is important.
 

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