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Highams
15.05.2003, 16:21
What ever happened to these test pieces, should they remain forgotten ?
any more out there ?

Embassy Suite, Allan Street
Joyful Noise & Pride of Youth, Gordon Jacob
Blackfriars, Cundell
Lorenzo, Keighly
The Frogs, Bantock.

CB

PeterBale
15.05.2003, 16:34
What ever happened to these test pieces, should they remain forgotten ?
any more out there ?

Embassy Suite, Allan Street
Joyful Noise & Pride of Youth, Gordon Jacob
Blackfriars, Cundell
Lorenzo, Keighly
The Frogs, Bantock.

CB

The Frogs was the first top section test piece I listened to once I started brass-banding. We were competing in the then 2nd section, The Frogs was set for the first and I managed to catch a couple of performances. Rather ironic that it was with The Frogs that my old band, by then Rolls Royce Coventry, won the first section finals in 1995 :!:

As to whether any of the oldies should be forgotten you can be sure that, whatever you name, someone will have a soft spot for it. I hope we can always keep a balance between developing new repertoire and celebrating our heritage.

dyl
15.05.2003, 16:41
Blackfriars was the Pontin's Section 1 test-piece in 2000.

NeilW
15.05.2003, 17:17
White Company - Norman Richardson

far too technical and not particularly tuneful from what I remember of it. We played in once - in the Colston Hall - and never again.

Neil.

baritone impresario
15.05.2003, 17:49
one piece that never gets chosen is seascapes by steadman allen cracking test piece

Darth_Tuba
15.05.2003, 18:12
I seem to remember Frogs was a Grand Shield test piece not long back. The results archive pages on 4br aren't working though, so I can't check.

Highams
16.05.2003, 08:37
Embassy Suite was the set work for the first Wills Finals at De Montford Hall Leicester in 1970.

I thought it was a great piece, results were;

1st. Morris Motors, Cliff Edmunds
2nd. Ransome & Marles, Dennis Masters
3rd. Yorkshire Imps, Trevor Walmsley
4th. Newham, Cyril Suckling.

www.euph9.freeserve.co.uk

Straightmute
16.05.2003, 09:06
What ever happened to these test pieces, should they remain forgotten ?
any more out there ?

Embassy Suite, Allan Street
Joyful Noise & Pride of Youth, Gordon Jacob
Blackfriars, Cundell
Lorenzo, Keighly
The Frogs, Bantock.

CB

Sad, but Lorenzo is probably Thomas Keighley's best remembered piece since it does resurface from time to time, and there is a CD recording currently available from the Virtuosi Band. He wrote the British Open test pieces every year for a decade or so (often on a Shakesperean theme) and it would be interesting to hear some of them again, if only once!

I'd like to put together a list of my favourite forgotten test pieces but I can't remember any.

D

PeterBale
16.05.2003, 09:56
Sad, but Lorenzo is probably Thomas Keighley's best remembered piece since it does resurface from time to time, and there is a CD recording currently available from the Virtuosi Band. He wrote the British Open test pieces every year for a decade or so (often on a Shakesperean theme) and it would be interesting to hear some of them again, if only once!
D

There is also an archive recording of Lorenzo on the Fodens Centenary double cd, and I'm pretty certain they played it a year or so ago at the Sunday concert following the Open. In fact quite a few bands have used that occasion to dust the cobwebs off some of the older pieces, as well as featuring new works.

Phil Green
16.05.2003, 10:15
There is also an archive recording of Lorenzo on the Fodens Centenary double cd, and I'm pretty certain they played it a year or so ago at the Sunday concert following the Open.

You're quite right Peter, we did. In fact, it's been requested by one of the band to replace our current "overture" Le Roy d'Ys in concerts. Shame more bands don't play it.

Phil.

BoozyBTrom
16.05.2003, 11:01
Couple of other forgotte greats.

Labour and Love
and the Judges of the Secret Court (not heard it in years)

and Life Divine

Curious
16.05.2003, 11:33
White Company - Norman Richardson

far too technical and not particularly tuneful from what I remember of it. We played in once - in the Colston Hall - and never again.

Neil.

If I remember correctly this was used as the 2nd section area test piece around about 1972/3, we also had to play it in the Eisteddfod that same year,but have never heard it live since.

There's a bizarre recording of it by Morris Concert Band where they experimented with instrumentation, 2 Flugs, some trumpets, tenor cors and I think 4 E flat basses instead of the usual 2 B flats.(Something like that anyway!).

I've never heard of 'Embassy Suite'.

Andrew R
16.05.2003, 11:33
What about Saga of the North, Scena Sinfonica and Oliver Cromwell.........and what about all of those Vinter pieces...James Cook, Spectrum, Variations on a 9th etc!. Even some of the early Gregson works like Plantagenets and Connotations rarely see the light of day today.....

As for Life Divine....that can stay in the library for another 25years as far as I'm concrened (personal choice!).

Andrew R
Redbridge Brass

:)

Highams
16.05.2003, 11:36
Anyone remember the Area test piece 'Concert Overture' by Vilem Tausky ? dreadful, with so many misprints !

CB

Straightmute
16.05.2003, 11:57
Anyone remember the Area test piece 'Concert Overture' by Vilem Tausky ? dreadful, with so many misprints !

CB

Yes I played that one - what a shocker. I've now remembered some forgotten ones: Carnival by Helen Perkin - anyone ever played it or even heard it in the last 20 years or so. I've seen the score...

Fusions by Howard Blake was considered outrageously modern at the time (70's) but then again so was the Ford Sierra. Never ever heard it played out. Ditto John McCabe's Images which I only know from an excellent Sun Life CD.

The biggest 'waste' of recent years must be the work of Robert Simpson. Energy, Volcano and Vortex are superb pieces which should see the light more often. Played Energy at the RAH in 91 but not since.

What was the piece that was composed for the Masters ten (ish) years ago by Robert Redhead (?). Completely forgotten!

D

Nik_The_Insane
16.05.2003, 12:05
As for Life Divine....that can stay in the library for another 25years as far as I'm concrened (personal choice!).

Andrew R
Redbridge Brass

:)

nooooo bring it back I like that piece...well ok maybe not to play but I love listening to it!

Highams
16.05.2003, 12:18
I agree on Energy, fantastic piece, just around 8 minutes, does exactly what it says on the score !

I think Images has to be the perfect test piece as far as testing every member of the band goes. I know it's not good listening material but the 4 seperate bass parts were great fun.

I also liked Main Street by Eric Ball, but I think On The Cornish Coast & 3 Muskateers can stay under wraps.

CB

PeterBale
16.05.2003, 12:27
What was the piece that was composed for the Masters ten (ish) years ago by Robert Redhead (?). Completely forgotten!

D

I don't think Bob Redhead wrote anything for the Masters, but he did do Isaiah 40 for the Nationals in 1996 or 97. It was recorded by the ISB and Grimethorpe but I agree it is rarely heard. Ray Steadman Allen did write for the Masters in 1996 - Hymn at Sunrise.



White Company - Norman Richardson

far too technical and not particularly tuneful from what I remember of it. We played in once - in the Colston Hall - and never again.

Neil

I also remember practising White Company and not thinking much of it - we much prefered Carnival Romain that we were working on at the same time. There was also another one from the same period, I think it was called The Four Corners of the World, that wasn't too bad - at least not for me on bass trombone!

Straightmute
16.05.2003, 12:31
What was the piece that was composed for the Masters ten (ish) years ago by Robert Redhead (?). Completely forgotten!

D

I don't think Bob Redhead wrote anything for the Masters, but he did do Isaiah 40 for the Nationals in 1996 or 97. It was recorded by the ISB and Grimethorpe but I agree it is rarely heard. Ray Steadman Allen did write for the Masters in 1996 - Hymn at Sunrise.


Quite right - I stand corrected! Hymn at Sunrise hasn't been heard much since despite being generally well recieved in Cambridge.

D

NeilW
16.05.2003, 12:32
Yes, White Company was WOE 2nd section sometime in the mid-70's - I would have guessed 73 if asked... It sticks in the memory because even though we won with it, we still didn't ever play it again.


and what about all of those Vinter pieces...James Cook, Spectrum, Variations on a 9th etc!. Even some of the early Gregson works like Plantagenets and Connotations rarely see the light of day today.....

The Vinter pieces were something else :o we played Spectrum and VonA9th out quite often (The InternationationalYouthMusicFestival in Holland in '74 or was it '75 springs to mind...). I liked them both.

Neil.

starperformer
15.06.2006, 16:47
this thread is pretty old - but half of these 'forgotten' pieces seem to have been used since!

my picks would have been "Pride of Race" (K. Wright)
or maybe "Freedom" (H. Bath) - the most played nationals piece of all time* and yet noone has ever heard of it. surely that's the ultimate forgotten test piece

* 3 times in '22, '47 and '73

dyl
15.06.2006, 16:49
this thread is pretty old
Aye! interesting reading back through it though. Particularly:


Couple of other forgotte greats.

Labour and Love
and the Judges of the Secret Court (not heard it in years)

and Life Divine

nickjones
15.06.2006, 16:56
Freedom is a real monster piece ( I think it's around the 9 or 10 min mark ) had a look at the set and score the other day , bright yellow ( and old and smelly parts) still quite small print for 1929 but a real monster..last used in 1987 at the Open..
Seascapes is another brilliant test...never used since '88 Nationals

pieces never to be used again Buxton Orr(ful) Caledonian Suite...didn't hear a scottish tune in this "Masterpiece" :(

brassneck
15.06.2006, 19:57
- here's a test-piece that has been truly forgotten (and I would love to get a recording of) ... Ciaccona Seria (Henk Badings) [1985]. I must admit that I do like the piece.

Nigel Hall
15.06.2006, 20:27
Two of my faves that never seem to get played these days are Gareth Wood's excellent Introduction & Allegro and Hinemoa. I think it's about time we heard them again.

Norwegianbaritone
15.06.2006, 20:29
What about Saga of the North, Scena Sinfonica and Oliver Cromwell.........and what about all of those Vinter pieces...James Cook, Spectrum, Variations on a 9th etc!. Even some of the early Gregson works like Plantagenets and Connotations rarely see the light of day today.....

As for Life Divine....that can stay in the library for another 25years as far as I'm concrened (personal choice!).

Andrew R
Redbridge Brass

:)
Some of these are quite popular over here. Even tho I'm quite young I've played Variations on a 9th, The Plantagenets, and Connotations, and that James Cook piece.

brassneck
15.06.2006, 20:39
Two of my faves that never seem to get played these days are Gareth Wood's excellent Introduction & Allegro and Hinemoa. I think it's about time we heard them again.

- Tombstone Arizona by the same composer was really enjoyable in it's day too!

Jan H
15.06.2006, 20:49
Indeed, here as well. Spectrum is the set piece in first section this year. It has been played as an own choice as well, as have the Plantagenets and Connotations. Variations on a Ninth has also been a set piece at the Belgian nationals a couple of years ago. Hinemoa was the set piece for the 3rd section in Kerkrade last year. Smithills School played it there.


- here's a test-piece that has been truly forgotten (and I would love to get a recording of) ... Ciaccona Seria (Henk Badings) [1985]. I must admit that I do like the piece.
As far as I know, Ciaccona Seria was originally written for fanfare orchestra.
Henk Badings is an extremely interesting composer. Before starting to compose, he studied engineering, so he had a very good knowledge of the physics behind sound. He composed some pieces in a 31 tonal system (31 tones in an octave, instead of the 12 tones in or usual system; this way one can make much more complex chords). He died in 1987, and he lived in a little village very close to my own, just accross the Dutch border.
Unfortunately, his music (symphonic or wind band) isn't played that much any more... Some of his most famous pieces for wind and fanfare band are Images and Sagas

GJG
15.06.2006, 20:59
Hymn at Sunrise hasn't been heard much since despite being generally well recieved in Cambridge.

Indeed. I would very much like to see (hear?) it being used, along with the same writer's "The Beacons" - another piece that has hardly been played since it was used at the qualifiers around 15(?) years ago.

I had hoped that the excellent YBS "Alpha and Omega" CD would generate more interest in Steadman-Allen's work, however not much sign of it yet ...

oohaah
15.06.2006, 21:33
Agree with Seascapes but would like to add New Jerusalem by Wilby. Should be used again surely!

BbBill
15.06.2006, 23:05
- Tombstone Arizona by the same composer was really enjoyable in it's day too!

I remember playing Tombstone at NYBBS, some 10 or so years ago, cant remember how it went like tho!

Anno Draconis
15.06.2006, 23:25
or maybe "Freedom" (H. Bath) - the most played nationals piece of all time* and yet noone has ever heard of it. surely that's the ultimate forgotten test piece

* 3 times in '22, '47 and '73

Also used at the Open in 87/88ish I think? I'm not especially keen on it, nor Lorenzo which was exhumed for Pontins last year - let's not hear that turgid old potboiler again. Put it in the same skip as Scena Sinfonica, Life Divine, Scena Sinfonica and Judges of the flippin' Secret Court. Oh, and James Cook, and Entertainments.

I would like to hear Seascapes again though, or The New Jerusalem. Kenilworth isn't bad, and I'm quite keen on Variations on The Shining River by Edmund Rubbra, which is harder than you'd think. Also I haven't heard Festival Music for ages, very listenable and an object lesson in how to construct old-fashioned traditional harmony and counterpoint. Triumphant Rhapsody would be worth resurrecting and a couple of old European tests - Morley Calvert's Introduction, Elegy and Caprice and Paul Huber's Symphonic Music.

alks
15.06.2006, 23:34
A few years ago someone in my band dug out and dusted off a piece called "saturday market overture " or morning overture or something sounding like that, apprently an early 90s test piece...but ive no idea what level or who its by.?

Either way, definetly completely forgotten never to be heard of again........

alks

brassneck
15.06.2006, 23:45
A few years ago someone in my band dug out and dusted off a piece called "saturday market overture " or morning overture or something sounding like that, apprently an early 90s test piece...but ive no idea what level or who its by.?

Either way, definetly completely forgotten never to be heard of again........

alks

:confused: by any chance is it ....
ANTHONY HEDGES (1931- ) was educated at Keble College, Oxford and pursued a teaching career at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama and then, from 1963 to 1995, at Hull University. He was, and is, a prolific composer in all forms, much of his output being suitable for amateurs and/or maintaining the best traditions of British light music. Heigham Sound, Cleveland, Holiday Overture and (for brass) Saturday Market are examples of the British light overture, while An Ayrshire Serenade, Three Dance Miniatures, Four Breton Sketches, British Folk Song Suite, Four Miniature Dances For My Children, Scenes From the Humber, Kingston Sketches (which depict Hull, of course) and, for strings, Divertimento, formerly styled Four Diversions, are examples of the light concert suite.

http://www.musicweb-international.com/garlands/101.htm

KMJ Recordings
15.06.2006, 23:59
That'll be the one.

It was used with Music for Greenwich as a two part test piece in the early 80s for the Youth Section Area IIRC.

Brian
16.06.2006, 01:10
Some I remember playing, conducting and or listening to that I enjoyed are:
Blenheim. Arthur Butterworth
Chorale and Variations. Leighton Lucas
California Legend. Bruce Broughton
Fusions. Howard Blake
Galaxies. Carl Davies/Ray Farr
Henry V.Overture. Vaughan-Williams/ Roy Douglas
Jodrell Bank. Peter Yorke
Royal Parks. George Lloyd
Symphonic Music. Paul Huber
Symphonic Suite for Brass. Leighton Lucas
Three Saints. Goff Richards
The Undaunted. Eric Ball

Some I never want to see again are:
Caledonian Suite. Buxton Orr
Cordell Suite. Helen Perkin
Crown Cavalcade. P.Beechfield Carver
Festival Overture. Henry Geehl
Festival Suite. Stuart Johnson
Flowers of the Forest. Richard Rodney-Bennett
Music for Brass Band. Martin Dalby
Sea Dogs. Maurice Johnstone
Three Inventions. Pi Scheffer/Albert Jakeway
White Company. Norman Richardson

HUDDSBASSBONE
16.06.2006, 07:47
Couldn't agree more with you on that one. Triumphant Rhapsody is an absolute corker. Love playing it, and audinences seem to enjoy hearing it (People who choose the test pieces, pay heed...)

Another one I also like, but I'm not sure where or when its been used or, even if it is classed as a test piece is Endeavour. Can't remember the composer but I remember having a recording on tape years back of a massed band playing it at a concert. Absolutely FAB! Never played it, but would love to get my teeth into what sounds to be a decent bass trombone part.

andyp
16.06.2006, 07:52
One of my favourites that's never heard now - "Three Musketeers" by George Hespe (?), good to play and listen to (slow movement in 5/4, good test for lower sections).
I vote for Henry V, too, cracking.

Charmed
16.06.2006, 08:00
What ever happened to these test pieces, should they remain forgotten ?
any more out there ?

Embassy Suite, Allan Street
Joyful Noise & Pride of Youth, Gordon Jacob
Blackfriars, Cundell
Lorenzo, Keighly
The Frogs, Bantock.

CB

Since this original post in May 2003, Lorenzo was the test piece for Pontins 2005 1st Section. So, although fairly old, it is obviously not a 'forgotten' test piece. Never heard of the others though! :biggrin:

AndyCat
16.06.2006, 08:04
Couldn't agree more with you on that one. Triumphant Rhapsody is an absolute corker. Love playing it, and audinences seem to enjoy hearing it (People who choose the test pieces, pay heed...)

Another one I also like, but I'm not sure where or when its been used or, even if it is classed as a test piece is Endeavour. Can't remember the composer but I remember having a recording on tape years back of a massed band playing it at a concert. Absolutely FAB! Never played it, but would love to get my teeth into what sounds to be a decent bass trombone part.

This is the Sparke Endeavour I think, on a 1988 Nationals Gala Concert recording. Great piece! Was used at Pontins 1st or 2nd section I think in the 90's.
There's also a Langford Endeavour, but I don't think this is the one you mean.


As for other pieces, what about Beacons (R.S.Allen) or Odin (A.Butterworth)?

Jan H
16.06.2006, 08:22
Never heard of the others though! :biggrin: Blackfriars was the set piece here in Belgium for the 1st section last year.
Selected by Mr. Read (and his two colleagues). So apparantly not everyone has forgotten it :) The bands weren't too happy about it though ("too old-fashioned" - the year before they had The Essence of Time, this year it'll be Spectrum...)

nickjones
16.06.2006, 08:59
Couldn't agree more with you on that one. Triumphant Rhapsody is an absolute corker. Love playing it, and audinences seem to enjoy hearing it (People who choose the test pieces, pay heed...)

Another one I also like, but I'm not sure where or when its been used or, even if it is classed as a test piece is Endeavour. Can't remember the composer but I remember having a recording on tape years back of a massed band playing it at a concert. Absolutely FAB! Never played it, but would love to get my teeth into what sounds to be a decent bass trombone part.

I think Mr Sparke's Endevour was last used as the Pontins Qualifier in 1993 ( when pontins had area qualifiers) brilliant piece...and on the Yorkshire Imps 1991 cd of the same name..

starperformer
16.06.2006, 10:19
Also used at the Open in 87/88ish I think? I'm not especially keen on it, nor Lorenzo which was exhumed for Pontins last year - let's not hear that turgid old potboiler again. Put it in the same skip as Scena Sinfonica, Life Divine, Scena Sinfonica and Judges of the flippin' Secret Court. Oh, and James Cook, and Entertainments.
i would love to know why people enjoy dismissing these sorts of pieces so much. they are almost universally more tuneful than anything we've had recently at any major contest, are obviously difficult to play if set at the right level, and in at least some cases were written by composers with better reputations than any alive today could possibly hope for (like Berlioz, Vinter, etc. also I recall Vaughan-Williams coming in for a bit of flak).
what exactly is the problem with them?

Anno Draconis
16.06.2006, 10:51
what exactly is the problem with them?

Well principally I just don't like them - that's music for ya, it's a subjective thing. And mostly it's individual pieces I dislike, not the composer's entire output. However, if you want specific reasons (and these are again just my personal opinion:

Scena Sinfonica: Dull and formulaic, symptomatic of the torpor that band music was in the 50s and 60s. I don't like any of Henry Geehl's music for the same reasons.

Life Divine: Like the above, written to a formula. I find it dull and repetitive, pompous and overblown. Similar in may ways to Liszt's tone poems which also give me the heeby-jeebies, I can find little of musical value in it. Personally I would say exactly the same about Lorenzo

Judges: A duff arrangement of one of Berlioz's worst overtures. In contrast, the band arrangments of Le Corsaire or Carnival Romaine are both great, in terms of the original music and quality of transcription.

James Cook Circumnavigator: Vinter was grievously hurt by the negative reaction to Spectrum and in this, his last band work, he made a conscious effort to tone down his harmonic language. The result is harmonically dull and predictable, with little of the colourful brilliance of Spectrum. The march at the end is just odd, with no real relevance to the rest of the piece.

Entertainments: Just don't like it. It doesn't work for me as a band transcription - it was originally a string piece. The Elegy is nice, I suppose, but it doesn't do anything for me.

I'm a huge fan of Vaughan Williams (especially Job and the symphonies), but I'm not convinced that the Variations represents his finest hour. And as far as reputations are concerned I'm not convinced that Vinter's reputation extends far beyond brass bands, whereas contemporary writers like Pickard, Wilby etc. are well known in other fields.

I don't have a problem with "old" music - Moorside Suite was in my top ten, and Pageantry just missed it - as long as it's good.

Bayerd
16.06.2006, 11:13
Life Divine: Like the above, written to a formula. I find it dull and repetitive, pompous and overblown. Similar in may ways to Liszt's tone poems which also give me the heeby-jeebies, I can find little of musical value in it. Personally I would say exactly the same about Lorenzo



Surely the fact it's overblown is a problem with the band not the music?

Anno Draconis
16.06.2006, 11:46
Surely the fact it's overblown is a problem with the band not the music?

Not meant in a performance sense - sorry, I should have been clearer. What I meant was I find the piece excessive, over the top. It tries too hard to achieve aural effect without actually having much to say musically.

I could level the same criticism at a number of recent test-pieces, too. Journey to the Centre of the Earth has very clever effects and interesting sounds in it but to me, doesn't have much music in it. It sums up Beecham's aphorism that the English "don't really like music, but they adore the sound it makes" (paraphrased 'cos I can't remember his exact words!).

GJG
16.06.2006, 12:06
...Beecham's aphorism that the English "don't really like music, but they adore the sound it makes" (paraphrased 'cos I can't remember his exact words!).

Actually, I don't have the exact quote to hand either, but I seem to recall he said: " ... the noise it makes." - which is even more appropriate, in a way.;)

starperformer
16.06.2006, 12:22
It tries too hard to achieve aural effect without actually having much to say musically.
well that immediately puts it right on a par with the majority of modern testpieces - "journey to the centre of the earth" is far from being the only one, it is the rule not the exception. the only difference is that the fashionable effects nowadays have moved on and are now far more superficial. life divine requires a good solid band sound to a much greater extent - maybe that's what bands worry about?

Anno Draconis
16.06.2006, 12:33
life divine requires a good solid band sound to a much greater extent - maybe that's what bands worry about?

Quite possibly. Ironically I wouldn't dispute LD's suitability as a test piece, precisely because it needs a good solid sound, good technique, sound intonation and ensemble, etc., etc. JTTCOFE similarly makes a good test, albeit targeted at the strengths of a specific band. I'm just not convinced there's much music in either of them.

But of course the debate about the musical content of test-pieces isn't part of this topic. Sorry to wander...:D

andywooler
16.06.2006, 14:20
I would add Chromascope, Paul Petterson - I like it myself but have never met anyone else who does which is a shame.

I last heard it at the Scaba contest in the days when it was held in the Brighton Dome - Alder Valley played it (as a bet??)

Anno Draconis
16.06.2006, 14:23
I would add Chromascope, Paul Petterson - I like it myself but have never met anyone else who does which is a shame.

[*raises hand) I do. Would make a good 1st section area piece! Patterson wrote a follow-up called Cataclysm (I think) which is even more obscure.

KMJ Recordings
16.06.2006, 14:23
I would add Chromascope, Paul Petterson - I like it myself but have never met anyone else who does which is a shame.

I last heard it at the Scaba contest in the days when it was held in the Brighton Dome - Alder Valley played it (as a bet??)

Apart from me.

I'm sure we've been here before? :confused:

KMJ Recordings
16.06.2006, 14:26
[*raises hand) I do. Would make a good 1st section area piece! Patterson wrote a follow-up called Cataclysm (I think) which is even more obscure.
You should've seen the audience response when Chromascope was played in the 70s :D

PeterBale
16.06.2006, 15:09
You should've seen the audience response when Chromascope was played in the 70s :D

Trinity College of Music Brass Band opened their lunch-time concert at Regent Hall with it a few years ago, and despite its still rather unusual sonorities no-one batted an eyelid. It certainly deserves to be performed moe frequently.

alks
16.06.2006, 15:47
:confused: by any chance is it ....

http://www.musicweb-international.com/garlands/101.htm


You know i think your right! , ill double check next time im allowed in the band library!
From what i remember its quite a good piece to play.... i think it must have been used as a lower section test piece at some point in the nineties as i seam to remember someone saying so.

Will it ever see the light of day again?

alks

johnflugel
16.06.2006, 16:01
I would like to see Kevin Norbury's "Odyssey" used again. Written for the ISB to use at the Nationals Gala then revised version used at the 1999 Europeans (set test won by B&R). Exciting to listen to and sure it would be a crowd pleaser.

KMJ Recordings
16.06.2006, 17:24
Trinity College of Music Brass Band opened their lunch-time concert at Regent Hall with it a few years ago, and despite its still rather unusual sonorities no-one batted an eyelid. It certainly deserves to be performed moe frequently.
I think the thing about that, though, is that (relative) atonality and odd things are much more commonplace in the Brass Band arena now. Take it back to 1974 and it was, er, a little more unusual ;)

Back on track, has Revelation been used as a set piece (maybe the European) since it was used at the Open?

Maestro
16.06.2006, 19:34
Does anyone remember 'Coriolanus'. I last played it a good namy years ago, and was wondering if it was ever played nowadays. If memory serves me right, I think it was by Cyril Jenkins.

brassneck
16.06.2006, 19:56
Does anyone remember 'Coriolanus'. I last played it a good namy years ago, and was wondering if it was ever played nowadays. If memory serves me right, I think it was by Cyril Jenkins.

- it was recorded by Sellers (Norman Law) on the Chandos "Legend In Brass" CD back in 1994 (CHAN 4531).

http://www.chandos.net/details05.asp?CNumber=CHAN%204531

robcav
16.06.2006, 21:31
I agree with the earlier poster who mentioned Odin. Why does noone play any Arthur Butterworth these days. Caliban and Maoriana are also terrific.

JR
17.06.2006, 10:19
Some I remember playing, conducting and or listening to that I enjoyed are:

Some I never want to see again are:
Caledonian Suite. Buxton Orr
Cordell Suite. Helen Perkin
Crown Cavalcade. P.Beechfield Carver
Festival Overture. Henry Geehl
Festival Suite. Stuart Johnson
Flowers of the Forest. Richard Rodney-Bennett
Music for Brass Band. Martin Dalby
Sea Dogs. Maurice Johnstone
Three Inventions. Pi Scheffer/Albert Jakeway
White Company. Norman Richardson


I agree with most of these Brian but not Sea Dogs - I think Maurice Johnstone is a very under-rated composer - I remember playing this overture at the old WD & HO Wills contest in 1969 at Preston! - it would still make a good 4th section test
The White Company was a 2nd section area test in 1973 but wasnt Richardson's best piece - he wrote a monster called Avalon which was played at the 3rd section finals at Fulham Town hall in 1971 - I played rep and came third! name of band - Rothwell Temps with my dad conducting - and who won? - Redbridge Youth (with a young John Clark on euph)

John R