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View Full Version : Maurice Murphy has died :-(



madrich
28.10.2010, 13:46
I'm trying to find a link to verify the story, but its all over twitter and facebook. The former prinicpal of Dyke and the LSO, trumpet superstar Maurice Murphy passed away this morning.

Euph4Rob
28.10.2010, 14:20
A musical legend who shall be greatly missed.

GordonH
28.10.2010, 14:36
LSo is reporting it in their twitter feed:

http://twitter.com/londonsymphony/status/28984218344

fartycat
28.10.2010, 14:37
LSO's twitter feed has confirmed it.

Very sad day, what a player, what a sound and so modest with it.

John_D
28.10.2010, 14:52
A very sad day. Another one of the greats now no longer with us.

madrich
28.10.2010, 14:58
There's a lovely retirement (although I'm not sure which retirement!) tribute to him here:

http://lso.co.uk/mauricemurphy

blue juice
28.10.2010, 15:07
RIP Maurice :(

John Brooks
28.10.2010, 15:14
Sad news indeed. My thoughts immediately went back to 1974 and his premier performance of the Tomlinson Cornet Concerto at RAH. An amazing, virtuoso performance.........one of many I know, but this one stands out in my memory. Thanks for so many truly wonderful musical memories Maurice; RIP.

robcav
28.10.2010, 15:20
There's a lovely retirement (although I'm not sure which retirement!) tribute to him here:

http://lso.co.uk/mauricemurphy

I think it's about his final retirement in 2007, rather than his original one in 2000. Very sad news.

Robhibberd29
28.10.2010, 15:41
...people that didn't know him or of him new his playing. God Bless Him

Bass Man
28.10.2010, 15:43
Very sad news indeed

jockinafrock
28.10.2010, 16:24
So sad to hear this :(

Anno Draconis
28.10.2010, 16:25
Also confirmed on LSO's Facebook wall.

Very sad news, a genuine musical legend. The finest trumpet player of his generation.

I'm sure there will be floods of tributes to his personality from those who knew him, and tributes to his playing from everyone who heard him. I'd like to add a quick one about his influence on composition.

When Star Wars came out, the trend was for pop/electronic or ensemble soundtracks and the big orchestral sound was deeply unfashionable. Williams score, and particularly Murphy's soaring contribution to the main theme restored the orchestral movie soundtrack to glory at a stroke, and created the "film music" style that has become the standard for Hollywood scores. Williams has gone on record in the past to say that part of the reason he wrote such glorious brass parts in so many of his scores was that he knew that the LSO, and Maurice in particular, would nail them every time. In that sense he's had more influence on modern composition than any avant-garde academic, no matter how famous.

Cornet_Matt
28.10.2010, 16:26
He was an inspiration for both cornet and trumpet players alike, and he will be greatly missed.

maryellan
28.10.2010, 16:29
One of the true legends. RIP

johnsop
28.10.2010, 16:53
It is such sad news that the most influential brass player of our generation has passed away and only a few years after his retirement. Maybe the trumpet playing was what kept him going.

RIP Mr Murphy!

WoodenFlugel
28.10.2010, 17:10
Really, really sad news. There isn't much to say that hasn't been said already. A true inspirational legend of brass playing. He will be missed.

Hells Bones
28.10.2010, 18:03
I didn't know Maurice, and was never fortunate to meet him.

But everyone I know who did meet him always said that he was always professional in his work and always very approachable when people wanted advice.

I know my teacher always looked up to Maurice and rightly so.

Literally billions of people have heard him play and his first note of Star Wars is probably the most known sound in the world. I doubt that can be said of anyone else.

RIP

al74
28.10.2010, 18:09
Met him twice , heard him many times, a true master of the art of projection on a Brass instrument. Will never forget his Mahler 5 !

Rest in Peace

Brian Bowen
28.10.2010, 18:44
When Star Wars came out, the trend was for pop/electronic or ensemble soundtracks and the big orchestral sound was deeply unfashionable. Williams score, and particularly Murphy's soaring contribution to the main theme restored the orchestral movie soundtrack to glory at a stroke, and created the "film music" style that has become the standard for Hollywood scores. Williams has gone on record in the past to say that part of the reason he wrote such glorious brass parts in so many of his scores was that he knew that the LSO, and Maurice in particular, would nail them every time.

Since his second retirement from the LSO, Maurice Murphy was featured in a concert given by Battle Creek Brass Band in Sarasota (FL). He was introduced as the man who played the trumpet theme tune for Star Wars. Probably no one in the audience, except for me, knew him by name but they certainly recognised that tune when he nailed it. Such a fine player.

My condolences to his family and friends.

trumpetmike
28.10.2010, 23:30
The original Star Wars recording was actually his first notes in the position of Principal Trumpet with the LSO - not bad for a first day in the new job.

I was lucky enough to meet Maurice a couple of times and he was one of the nicest people I have ever had the pleasure of meeting.
He inspired thousands of players, myself included and lived up to (and exceeded) all his wonderful reputation, both with the trumpet and without.

With the passing of Maurice Murphy the world has lost not just a great trumpeter (possibly THE greatest), not just a great musician, but a truly wonderful human being.

Gabriel has been demoted

Bass Trumpet
28.10.2010, 23:32
Legend. Simple as that.

I am truly honoured to have known him. My own experiences of working with him are few, but memorable and I will always be proud to say I played in a section with him. When he was playing, there was that extra sparkle that spread throughout the whole orchestra that I have never experienced with any other trumpet player.

Very sad to see him go.

PeterBale
28.10.2010, 23:32
Gabriel has been demoted

:clap: :clap: :clap:

Bass Trumpet
28.10.2010, 23:35
gabriel has been demoted

lol

trumpetmike
29.10.2010, 08:04
I wish I could take the credit for it, but I am ashamed to admit I pinched that from someone on Facebook

Paddy Flower
29.10.2010, 10:13
I think i'm right in saying he also provided the well known Cornet solo on the Gladiator soundtrack

RIP MM

Ava Banana
29.10.2010, 11:53
.....not forgetting the incidental music on Brassed Off.

HornBlast
29.10.2010, 12:23
I heard a story that the first ever note that he played with the LSO was the opening chord of Star Wars! Is this true?
Legend.
RIP

Pondasher
29.10.2010, 13:27
This is very sad news indeed about the passing of Maurice. He always was my favourite player from the time I heard him play Le Roi D'Ys with Black Dyke. His cornet and trumpet playing was only equalled
by his modesty, sincerity and love of life.

I see that his age is given as 74 on 4barsrest.com but he was actually 75, as his date of birth was
7th August 1935. We shared the same birthday of 7th August but he was just a few years older than me.

RIP to the greatest player ever!

Jan H
29.10.2010, 15:32
I heard a story that the first ever note that he played with the LSO was the opening chord of Star Wars! Is this true?
Legend.
RIP
see post #21 by Trumpetmike in this very same thread...

trumpetmike
29.10.2010, 15:52
I heard a story that the first ever note that he played with the LSO was the opening chord of Star Wars! Is this true?
Legend.
RIP

It was the first thing he played in the official position of principal trumpet, but he had played as guest principal on a tour (America, possibly?) before he was offically appointed.

Alyn James
29.10.2010, 16:55
I have a CD (EMI Classics - LSO, cond. Michael Tilson Thomas, soprano Barbara Hendricks, rec. 1994) containing Copland and Barber music.

I ordered the CD specifically to hear Maurice Murphy playing Copland's "Quiet City". MM is tremendous - it's worth the price of the CD for just that one track. Thanks MM. :clap:

Baton twirler
30.10.2010, 08:09
The two Maurices of the trumpet world (Andre and Murphy) have been a great inspiration to myself and many others. I heard Mr Murphy at the Stars In Brass recording in Manchester a number of years ago and he was just amazing, brilliant sound and technique. Something went wrong with the recording of Virtuosity and he came back on to play, cracked a joke and then nearly took the roof off with the last note (F above top C I think). I think Frank Renton said something like "the last note was a top 'Z' folks!" His recording of the Denis Wright Cornet Concerto with the City of Coventry Band is a solo that also stands out for me, superb. RIP the legend, Maurice Murphy.

jockinafrock
31.10.2010, 00:44
Once had the honour and delight of accompanying Maurice when he guested for our band in Consett about 16 years ago. The Arutunian Concerto was awesome - just like the man himself.... :clap:

James Yelland
03.11.2010, 18:02
Rather late in the day, I'm afraid, but if you can get hold of a copy of today's Times (Wednesday 3rd November) there is a fine obituary of Maurice Murphy. It's the lead obit, and pushes a middle eastern King and the former Prime Minister of Barbados into 2nd and 3rd places. Quite right too.

No doubt you can find it online too but The Times now charges for its online content.

Unregistered
04.11.2010, 02:57
As a trumpet student, this is a huge loss! maurice was such a great player and someone who manage to touch many with his playing. He was a lovely man, but his playing will always live on!

We should all be happy to listen/enjoy his playing even now! my thoughts are with those who were close to him and knew him well, we will always remember maurice in many positive ways!

Rest in peace, a hero to many!

x

Brian Bowen
01.12.2010, 13:07
And here's the obituary from the Guardian:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2010/nov/29/maurice-murphy-obituary

Some interesting anecdotes.

Bryan_sop
27.01.2011, 22:19
And caused by an incompetant junior doctor apparently, according to This is London (http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/standard/article-23917925-star-wars-and-harry-potter-musician-died-after-doctor-put-food-tube-into-his-lung.do)

Brian Bowen
27.01.2011, 22:20
I wondered why we hadn't heard the cause of death earlier but now we know:

http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/standard/article-23917925-star-wars-and-harry-potter-musician-died-after-doctor-put-food-tube-into-his-lung.do

It seems to have been avoidable -- doctor's error.:(

Bryan_sop
27.01.2011, 22:32
And from what it seems, the doctor responsible is still employed!!??

trumpetmike
28.01.2011, 07:44
It is a great shame that it happened in this way, but sadly mistakes do happen. In this particular case it happens to be someone that means a lot to the brass world, but every day there will be mistakes that will have an impact on a family somewhere.
When we, as musicians, make a mistake then the results might mean that an audience doesn't get the "perfect" performance (or we don't do well at a contest). In the grand scheme of things, this is hardly an issue.
Tragically, when a Doctor makes a mistake it is possible that someone dies.
If we were to fire every musician who ever made a mistake, the band rooms of this country would be even emptier than they already are. It is a hard thing to say, but I really don't feel we should expect to fire the Doctor in this case - he made a mistake.
Yes, it is a tragedy when mistakes happen (especially if it results in the death of someone that we might personally know) but they do and (very sadly) they always will.

Maurice - the music lives on (as do the memories)

Red Elvis
28.01.2011, 10:41
Just read the link. Very , very sad and all so avoidable.As Trumpetmike says , mistakes do happen and unfortunately in the medical / nursing profession the results can be catastrophic.

I've worked in the ITU setting for years at a fairly senior level , and in my organisation we have a defined protocol for ensuring the NG is correctly placed by aspirating stomach contents and verifying with X ray before feeding. The tube is also checked after the first hour , then two and then four to see that the feed is being absorbed. I can't ( much as I have tried since seeing this last night ) for the life of me imagine how or why a newly established feed has been allowed to continually run ( at least as the article implies and one of course has to be cautious in this regard) for two days before this most basic error was discovered.

Should the Dr be fired ? thats a difficult one and I agree to an extent with Trumpetmike's view. However , there does appear ( and again I'm only going on the premise of the article ) that there was a wilful ignorance of hospital procedure and the concern of the nursing staff.I suspect that , were the family to pursue this then the GMC may be having a word.

iancwilx
28.01.2011, 13:08
I am appalled at the arrogance of the Doctor concerned.
He should at least suffer demotion and retraining.
It is terrible how such a smashing guy with such a rich talent could be snuffed out by an act of high handed incompetence.

- Mr Wilx

GJG
30.01.2011, 01:40
It's difficult. It would seem easy on the face of it to blame the Junior Doctor, but I'm not convinced that all the facts are known. In many ways I would guess it's just symptomatic of a general malaise in the way the NHS is run. There are a couple of questions which spring to mind (to me, at any rate):
1) If the nurse was so worried that something was wrong, why was there no procedure in place whereby she could communicate her concerns to a "neutral" third party, so as to avoid the difficulty inherent in questioning a "direct" superior ... ?
2) Once the Radiologist had identified the problem, why was he not "running down the corridor" to ensure that corrective action was taken, rather than simply "filing a report", then assuming that it would be picked up and actioned ... ?

What is really sad is that cock-ups like this probably occur on an almost daily basis on the NHS. As it happens, I have been directly affected by something similar, whereby my Father-in-law had a chest X-ray done some years ago, which showed up a lung tumour, but was somehow "filed" and not forwarded to the right people. By the time it was picked up, it had developed into full-blown lung cancer, from which he subsequently died. Now, no-one can say whether it would have made any difference to his chances of survival if the cancer had been identified earlier, however the doubt will always remain.

For every such instance, there will always be an element of tragedy; there will always be someone's wife, sons, daughters, etc. left wondering "what if ... " and in one sense there is no reason to say that it is in some way a "greater" tragedy, just because the victim in this case is an internationally renowned trumpet player. However there is no doubt that the effect of such an apparently senseless and avoidable loss will be more keenly felt worldwide than would the loss of a relative unknown.

Apologies if the above seems a bit maudlin' and ramblin'; I've often berated myself for inadvisedly posting in the small hours following the consumption of unwise amounts of alcohol, however if i'd waited until the cold light of day, I probably wouldn't have posted at all, and I do feel quite strongly about this, so that would have been a shame, in some ways ...

DublinBass
30.01.2011, 07:38
Apologies if the above seems a bit maudlin' and ramblin'; I've often berated myself for inadvisedly posting in the small hours following the consumption of unwise amounts of alcohol, however if i'd waited until the cold light of day, I probably wouldn't have posted at all, and I do feel quite strongly about this, so that would have been a shame, in some ways ... [/FONT][/SIZE][/FONT]

Gareth...I think you bring up some great points....and also point out why many in the States are not optimistic of Obamacare!!

trumpetmike
30.01.2011, 08:52
and also point out why many in the States are not optimistic of Obamacare!!

I have seen a couple of US trumpeters use this incident as a way of adding to their disliking of Obama and the Health Care that he is trying to get in place. If it was true that mistakes never happen in the private sector then it MIGHT be a valid argument, but tragic mistakes happen in the private medical world as well as the NHS (yes, sadly I have experience of this as well).