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waynefiler
14.08.2006, 12:32
I'm hoping to do the LTCL performance diploma sometime in the near future:clap: but having trouble finding anything on Arutjunjan himself or anything about the concerto.:oops:

Does anyone out there know anything about him? or
Performed the concerto and got any notes I could take a look at? or
Know any decent websites where i cound find some info on him and the concerto?
:rolleyes: :confused:
Any help will very greatful

Thanks all

IOT, HM

yorkie19
14.08.2006, 13:50
There's an article on him on the German version of Wikipedia.

Basically, it seems Alexander Arutjunjan was born in Yerevan, Armenia on 23rd September 1920. In 1934, he began studying composition and piano at the conservatoire in Yerevan. In 1941 these studies were interrupted and he didn't resume them until 1944 in Moscow. He returned home to Yerevan in 1946 on the completion of his studies where he composed the two pieces that really made his name the "Cantata of my homeland" (1948 ) and the Trumpet Concerto (1950). In 1954 he was appointed as a tutor of composition at the conservatoire in Yerevan and in 1977 he was appointed Professor of composition.

His music is influenced by Armenian folk-music but also borrows heavily from the Baroque and Romantic periods.

He was still composing at the end of the 1990's (having written a Tuba Concerto in 1992 and a Trombone Concerto in 1991).

brasscrest
14.08.2006, 14:21
He was still composing at the end of the 1990's (having written a Tuba Concerto in 1992 and a Trombone Concerto in 1991).


Wouldn't that be at the beginning of the 1990's, not the end? :)

I didn't know he'd written a tuba concerto. Like to hear that one sometime.

Anno Draconis
14.08.2006, 14:44
I believe it was written for the Russian virtusos Timofei Dok****ser (I think that's how you spell his name:confused: ), who wrote the cadenza that is used in the published version. He died last year in Vilnius, Lithuania.

brasscrest
14.08.2006, 14:47
Any idea if it's been recorded?

Anno Draconis
14.08.2006, 14:48
Blast, stymied by the bleep filter. His surname is Dokshizer with the "z" pronounced as "ts", as in German!

Found a website (http://www.dokshizer.com/emain.html), but I can't find a mention of the Arutiunian concerto.

Anno Draconis
14.08.2006, 14:56
Any idea if it's been recorded?

I'm pretty sure that Marsalis has recorded it, I'll try and find out. There is a recording of the Brass Band arrangement of the accompaniment (by Michael Antrobus, I think) on the 1987 Gala Concert recording, played by Rod Franks.

EDIT: Found this (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/search/ref=nb_ss_w_h_/026-6065583-6861256?url=search-alias%3Dclassical&field-keywords=Arutiunian+Concerto&Go.x=11&Go.y=8), on Amazon

yorkie19
14.08.2006, 15:06
Wouldn't that be at the beginning of the 1990's, not the end? :)

I didn't know he'd written a tuba concerto. Like to hear that one sometime.


OK, for clarity ;).

He was still composing at the end of the 1990's, having written concertos for the tuba and the trombone earlier in the decade.

nickjones
14.08.2006, 15:06
Any idea if it's been recorded?

the trumpet or tuba concerto recording you are looking for?
If your looking for a recording of the trumpet concerto Rod Franks recorded it on his cd saving face , it's also on the 1987 National Finals Gala concert recording ( Polyphonic)
the tuba concerto can be obtained from editions BIM in switzerland there is a recording by Harri Lidsle.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ref.: MILS9651
Oulu Symphony Orchestra
Concertos
for tuba, horn and trombone Details

Harri Lidsle, tuba
Esa Tukia, horn
Erkki Hirsimäki, trombone

Atso Almila, conductor
Price: CHF 30.00
€ 19.80 US$ 24.90

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

www.editions-bim.com

hornyas
14.08.2006, 17:17
On the Trumpet Concerto, Maurice Andre recorded it on the Errato label (which is a fantastic rendition), and I know there have also been recordings done by Maurice Murphy and Hakan Hardenberger.

hornyas
14.08.2006, 17:22
Oh, and also try searching under lots of different versions of his name: Arutjunjan, Arutunian, Arrutunian, Arutunnian, etc, etc.

joelrn
14.08.2006, 17:38
There's a good recording by Bibi Black: CD title Soviet Trumpet Concertos.
It was once suggested to me that the piece depicts the plight of an Armenian soldier returning from battle, finding out his wife had been killed in the war etc. The definied sections are representative of mental state and emotion I think wasd the basic message.

trumpetmike
14.08.2006, 17:49
I believe it was written for the Russian virtusos Timofei Dokshizer (I think that's how you spell his name:confused: ), who wrote the cadenza that is used in the published version. He died last year in Vilnius, Lithuania.

It was not written for Maestro Dokshizer, it was written for his friend Aikaz Mesiayan, who also premiered it. However, Dokshizer did perform it over 200 times during his life.

You can obtain a CD containing his interpretation of this piece through the International Trumpet Guild website - http://www.trumpetguild.org/products/recordings/index.htm - this is THE interpretation to follow, according to every trumpet authority I have heard talk about this piece.

Maurice Murphy has also recorded this piece, as has Jim Watson (the latter using brass band accompaniment)

Anno Draconis
14.08.2006, 19:32
It was not written for Maestro Dokshizer, it was written for his friend Aikaz Mesiayan, who also premiered it. However, Dokshizer did perform it over 200 times during his life.

Aah, my mistake - apologies :oops: . Thanks for clearing that up.

brassneck
14.08.2006, 20:54
WRONG! I have the sleevenotes from the CD Maurice Murphy played it on (Favourite Trumpet Concertos, 1990. Collins Quest 30082)


In an interview that he gave in 1989 to the magazine 'Brass Bulletin' Arutiniunian talked about his lifelong interest in brass instruments and explained how he had come to compose the trumpet concerto. He described how, during his childhood, brass ensembles of between eight and ten instruments were to be heard in all American villages and towns playing for "all festivities and funerals" and how their sounds and tunes had become "deeply etched" in his memory. Regarding his single-movement Trumpet concerto he told a rather sad story. As a child he spent his Summers in a particular village and there heard a 17-year old trumpet player called Zolak Vartasarian, who "had the habit of playing some very virtuoso pieces" under the balcony of the house where Arutiunian was staying. Later, when Vartasarian was appointed principal trumpet of the Yenevan Opera, he and Arutiunian became friends. In 1943 Arutiunian played a theme to Vartasarian, who liked it and suggested incorporating it in a trumpet concerto. Unfortunatley Vartasarian died that year, in the war. Thus the trumpet came to have a special significance to Arutiunian and in 1950 he completed the concerto he had promised to his friend. The concerto was given it's premiere performance in Moscow by Timofey Dokschidser (notes by Peter Avis)

brassneck
14.08.2006, 22:06
Other recordings include Roger Webster, Arturo Sandoval & Sergei Nakariakov.

trumpetmike
14.08.2006, 22:46
WRONG! I have the sleevenotes from the CD Maurice Murphy played it on (Favourite Trumpet Concertos, 1990. Collins Quest 30082)
Our CDs disagree then - mine is taken from Russian Treasures, played by Timofei Dokshizer, published by the ITG:
"The Alexander Arutunian Concerto's genesis is often mistakenly attributed to Dokshizer. Although he edited the trumpet part and wrote the cadenza for this work, which was accepted by the composer, the Concerto was written for Dokshizer's friend, Aikaz Mesiayan. Mesiayan, who premiered Arutunian's endeavour, was also a student of the legendary Russian trumpet professor and teacher Michael Tabokov. Dokshizer has performed this work more than 200 times throughout the world, and it is his interpretation which is held as the standard."

The same story is found in The Memoirs of Timofei Dokshizer - also published by ITG and an essential read if you are looking to further your knowledge of music from that great performer.
"Neither was the Concerto by Arutunian written for me. It was written for my friend, Aikaz Mesiayan, with whom I studied under Tabokov and with whom I began my service in the army. Mesiayan was the first performer of the Concerto. I edited the trumpet part, wrote a cadenza which was approved by the composer, and performed this concerto more than 200 times on different continents."

Personally, I would take Maestro Dokshizer's own words over the sleeve notes of Peter Avis (yes, I have that recording as well).

brassneck
14.08.2006, 22:49
I agree, someone hasn't been telling the truth ... do we believe the comments of the composer or the performer? :-? (... cannot ask either of them since they are both dead!).

trumpetmike
14.08.2006, 22:57
What is most important is to hear Maestro Dokshizer playing it - his interpretation is simply incredible and is the only on I listen to when I am preparing or revisiting this piece. I can listen to all the others at other times, but I feel that only Dokshizer truly captures the true spirit of the piece.

brassneck
14.08.2006, 22:58
I found the source (interview) from the Murphy sleevenotes ...

http://www.brass-bulletin.com/articles/arutiunian_85/01.htm

trumpetmike
14.08.2006, 23:03
Very interesting, thanks.

Interestingly, Arutunian doesn't say that Dokshizer gave the first performance, that comes from Jean-Pierre Mathez, the interviewer.

brassneck
14.08.2006, 23:19
Very interesting, thanks.

Interestingly, Arutunian doesn't say that Dokshizer gave the first performance, that comes from Jean-Pierre Mathez, the interviewer.

he doesn't say anything about the concerto in the transcript --- The truth is out there! :terrier

trumpetmike
14.08.2006, 23:23
I decided to take a search through Trumpetherald's archives - with all those trumpeters it is something that is bound to have come up before - sure enough, 12 pages' worth of threads mentioning Arutunian, some of which are worth reading if you are looking for more information.
One gem is http://abel.hive.no/trumpet/haydn/appendices.html which features an interview with Arutunian, which includes the following:


"Was the concerto commissioned for anybody? If not, what were the reasons for writing it?
1. The Concerto was written in 1950 not commissioned by or for anyone. I have been fond of the trumpet since my childhood and it was natural I would want to have written such a concerto. Then, I had a friend, Tsolak Vartazarian by name, an excellent trumpetist, who also was kind of a stimulus for my Concerto. The first performer of the Concerto (that could perhaps interest you) was Aykaz Messiayan"

Maybe we have got to the bottom of this?

brassneck
14.08.2006, 23:37
- it is maybe because of the cadenza that the original soloist was partially forgotten. Has anyone actually traced the original cadenza? I search the net and found only comments about it in forums!

Anno Draconis
14.08.2006, 23:47
Something tells me this has gone beyond IOTHM's orginal post, into one of those "open a bottle of scotch" internet quests that result in getting to bed at stupid o'clock!

It never ceases to amaze me how there seems to be no question about brass music that the tMP community can't answer :clap: . At least I was right about the cadenza :D

trumpetmike
15.08.2006, 00:20
Something tells me this has gone beyond IOTHM's orginal post, into one of those "open a bottle of scotch" internet quests that result in getting to bed at stupid o'clock!
Mine was being assisted by a lovely Italian white acquired last week - I apologise if the correct drink should have been Scotch.


It never ceases to amaze me how there seems to be no question about brass music that the tMP community can't answer :clap: . At least I was right about the cadenza :D
Made even more fun by forum-hopping until appropriate answers are found:biggrin:

brassneck
15.08.2006, 00:22
...Made even more fun by forum-hopping until appropriate answers are found:biggrin:

- it was quite civilised too! :eek:

trumpetmike
15.08.2006, 09:16
- it was quite civilised too! :eek:

:lol:
There are such things as civilised trumpeters - just about;)

(usually those who dabble on cornet as well:clap: )

TheMusicMan
15.08.2006, 09:30
:lol:
There are such things as civilised trumpeters - just about;)

(usually those who dabble on cornet as well:clap: )Nahhhh... ;);)

Adrian Horn
15.08.2006, 11:45
Funnily enough, I've just started writing some programme notes for my own website and have just touched up my Arutiunian Trumpet Concerto notes. Here it is:

Concerto for Trumpet - Alexander Arutiunian (b. 1920)

Andante—Allegro energico
Meno mosso
Tempo I

Alexander Arutiunian was born in Yerevan, Armenia, on September 23, 1920. He graduated from Yerevan Conservatory in 1941 and then, in 1946, studied composition for two years at the House of Armenian Culture in Moscow with Litinsky. On his return to Armenia he claimed the position of Musical Director of the Royal Philharmonic Society and, in 1954, was appointed Musical Director of the Armenian Philharmonic Orchestra.
The Trumpet Concerto in Ab was Arutiunian’s sixth major composition and is his most famous work. Although not commissioned to write the concerto, he had intended to write one in 1943 and had been inspired by his friend and native trumpeter Tsolak Vartazarian, Principal Trumpet of the Armenian Philharmonic, but unfortunately Vartazarian was killed in military action during the war and the work got sidelined until its first performance in 1950 by Aykaz Messiayan. The work however became most well known through performances by Timofei Dokshizer who introduced it to a wider audience when he emigrated to the United States. Dokshizer was also the first to record this work and his recording is still the standard against which all other recordings are rated.

The Trumpet Concerto was written as a concert piece that could be enjoyed by all audiences. As with much of Arutiunian’s music, it is strongly influenced by his nationality, incorporating melodic and rhythmic flavours of Armenian folk music, although he avoids using any actual folk tunes and does not try to tell a story with the music.

Although written in three parts, Andante-Allegro energico, Meno mosso and Tempo I, the concerto was not conceived to have separate movements, and these parts should be considered more as sections within a one movement work, and are joined together without pause. After the brief declamatory opening the work gets underway with a lively, dancing and lyrical theme. This is contrasted in the Meno mosso with a reflective interlude featuring beautiful slow melodic and sometimes haunting lines sung through the muted trumpet. The Tempo I sees the return of the spirited opening theme. This is now usually performed with a cadenza written in 1977 by Timofei Dokshizer (a cadenza described by Arutiunian as ‘Wonderful’).

Adrian Horn