Yamaha cornet mouthpieces

Discussion in 'theMouthPiece.com User Reviews' started by imthemaddude, Jun 17, 2004.

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Cornets....What type of mouthpiece do you play on

  1. Wick

    64.4%
  2. Yamaha

    11.5%
  3. Other

    24.1%
  1. DanB

    DanB Member

    Messages:
    85
    Location:
    Leicester

    Yes, all the feedback I've heard definitely agrees with you! I THINK (correct me if I'm wrong) the Sparx ones are designed for trumpets (including a specific range for screamers, which I assume are what work on sop?!!!), whereas GR have now developed a range specifically for cornets. Both GR and Sparx use the same technology, but I've no idea what that is! Seems to work though!!!
     
  2. GingerMaestro

    GingerMaestro Active Member

    Messages:
    1,080
    Location:
    Tewkesbury
    Thanks for that. I knew it was something to do with that but was not 100% sure which part it was

    Cheers Gordon
     
  3. sop 1

    sop 1 Member

    Messages:
    372
    Location:
    south wales
    sparx mouthpieces

    no they are the ones designed for cornets! in fact the 4E is a little deeper than the warbuton i was playing on,GR and SPARX i think are in partnership check out the website www.sparxmusic.com
    :biggrin:
     
  4. SA-Corneter

    SA-Corneter New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    Newcastle upon Tyne
    I have a Yam 11E4 mp I used to play it , its easy on the lips so u can play for a while with it, its gd in upper middle and lower registers and i helps with your tone, only changed cos got similar size to my trumpet on so was better wen swapping between the two
     
  5. Griffis

    Griffis Member

    Messages:
    102
    Location:
    Cardiff
    Well, I currently play on a plastic mouthpiece which was actually a prototype for the new DK mouthpice range, an I have to say I wouldnt change it for the world!
    Started off on a wick 4, then moved to a wick 3, then got given the plastic prototype for the DK range, and its awesome! Wouldnt even change it for a metal version...so although i look like a t*t...i feel comfertable playing it
     
  6. Courtenay! :)

    Courtenay! :) New Member

    Messages:
    14
    Location:
    County Durham
    I started off playing on a Yamaha mouthpiece (I don't remember which model, whatever one comes with a beginner cornet, I suppose.)
    But then my friend, the sop player from band, sold me a Vincent Bach Corp 6 mouthpiece, and it's brilliant.

    I currently play on a Yamaha 5C trumpet mouthpiece, which is okay but I'm looking for a better one, if anyone could reccommend any good trumpet mouthpieces? I'm originally a cornet player so I'm thinking of getting one similar to my cornet mouthpiece for ease of switching between instruments, but someone told me that's not a good idea...could anyone shed any light?
     
  7. Courtenay! :)

    Courtenay! :) New Member

    Messages:
    14
    Location:
    County Durham
    Really?! Everyone I've spoken to about plastic mouthpieces prefers metal ones lol :tongue:
    I've got a plastic one but it makes me sound funny so I only use it on outside engagements when it's likely to be cold, like Remembrance Parades, as metal hurts when it's cold :-?
     
  8. Cornet Nev.

    Cornet Nev. Member

    Messages:
    507
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Hum, well where do I start? Perhaps at the beginning. As I may have mentioned elsewhere I am an engineer by employment and career, it may come as no surprise that I have a complete workshop at home as well. For those with the interest a Boxford lathe and a few other machine tools, but the lathe is the important piece here.
    I looked at mouthpieces way back in 1999 when I first started learning to play, and decided, "why pay for a fancy mouthpiece when I can make one?"
    Oh no it ain't that easy is it? I wish it was, nine years on, several home made disasters, and a collection of manufactured mouthpieces later, I bought a Denis Wick RW4B, perhaps the best for me up to now.
    I recently bought the latest Besson Sovereign which came with an alliance 3B, which I find difficult to get to grips with. Though dimensionally is not much different than the RW4B, I find some difficulty keeping all my notes as near to on tune as possible with it. All I can say after a lot of experiment to find the mouthpiece that works for me, I haven't got there yet. Very near though, and armed now with a lot more knowledge, I just might be able to make the one true piece, who knows till I try?
    Just my explanation of the trial and error for my two penny worth.
     
  9. That confirms it Nev.
    You are a true Band Geek! :wink:
     
  10. Aussie Tuba

    Aussie Tuba Member

    Messages:
    872
    Location:
    Brisbane Australia
    I was playing on a Perrantuci and have moved over to new technology in Mouthpiece design. a loud LM-7.


    http://www.loudmouthpieces.com/index.php


    Loud do cornet / trumpet Mouthpeices and from my experience their claims stack up well, I won't be going back to the perrantucci or the wick.
     
  11. DCB

    DCB New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Just got a RW3 and I can't see me needing any other mouthpiece for my cornet!

    Peace
     
  12. Drummer_cornetgirl91

    Drummer_cornetgirl91 Member

    Messages:
    36
    Location:
    Co. Durham
    I am currently using a Dennis Wick 4B after returning to playing cornet regularly after playing Sop most of the time using an S mouth piece. I find that since coming off Sop. and using the 4B I still have problems with misspitching and my tuning slide seems like its half a mile out. However, before I began playing Sop I used to use the Yamaha 16E that I got with my Maestro, the 16E's produce a really nice sound, However the tuning was difficult when playing higher registers. I have also breifly tried a Dennis Wick 5B which are very good, I found that it produced a nice sound and i found it easier to play higher register notes.
     
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