Who are the oldest Band still going?

Discussion in 'Brass Band Genealogies' started by robcornet, Jan 16, 2008.

  1. johnsop

    johnsop Member

    This is probably true, I was not entirely certain of the dates, but I know that they started life as reed and brass band (which many bands did - including Dyke!).

    When they became a true brass band I am unclear of. New Mills definitely started in 1812 as a true BRASS BAND.
     
  2. MoominDave

    MoominDave Well-Known Member

    Taken from the website of the United Co-op New Mills Band:

    Suggests that it wasn't a true brass band in 1812...
     
  3. Thirteen Ball

    Thirteen Ball Active Member

    United co-op yorkshire are ten years old this year!


    ....


    ..... (Tumbleweed)



    ... coat
     
  4. Anno Draconis

    Anno Draconis Well-Known Member

    Not in the modern meaning of it, they didn't. They would certainly not have had tenor horns or baritones (Saxhorns weren't invented until the 1830s and were hardly used in Britain until the 1850s) and would have been very unlikely to have had tubas. Also the modern cornet wasn't around in any sort of recognisable form at that time.

    If you mean that they started as a "non-reed" band, i.e. all the instruments had metal mouthpieces, then that's quite possible - but not the same as being the first "brass band" as we know it. The earliest bands with our something like our current standard instrumentation would have come into being in around the early 1860s.
     
  5. TraceyN

    TraceyN New Member

    My old band have full brass since 1813. The Melton Band

    No longer a member of the band as i moved away. I am now looking for a new band closer to where i live.

    http://www.meltonband.co.uk/index.html
     
  6. AEHOWGATE

    AEHOWGATE Member

    According to their Centenary Booklet, Stalybridge were formed in 1814, attempts were made to form a band by Thomas Avison in Stalybridge in 1809, but it did not come to fruition. His second attempt worked (1814).

    New Mills were formed in 1812, by Timothy Beard, Choirmaster of the Brookbottom Methodist Chapel. It is presumed that the band were formed when the Methodist Chapel installed an Organ. Generations of the Beard family were prominent figures at New Mills Old Prize Band for over a century.
     
  7. sopking

    sopking New Member

    it might be worth looking at the Melton Band, who led the parade through Melton Mowbray for queen Victoria's coronation in 1838. Just a thought.
     
  8. tony winterbottom

    tony winterbottom New Member

    oldest brass band.

    As a ex-player of Stalybridge of 15yrs service I can confirm that Stalybridge claim to be the oldest surviving civilian band brass or otherwise. I hope thats cleared that up. Besides the brass band format was still to be realised by 'Gladney' when the band was established.
     
  9. tony winterbottom

    tony winterbottom New Member

    p.s. stalybridge was established in November 1809
     
  10. AEHOWGATE

    AEHOWGATE Member

    no. 1814. we have to go off the evidence. As i said earlier in the thread, they attempted to form a band in 1809 but it didnt work. I have proof. do you?
     
  11. AEHOWGATE

    AEHOWGATE Member

    P.S. claims are worth nothing.
     
  12. tony winterbottom

    tony winterbottom New Member

    Many thanks for your response, be it a bit confrontational. I did say claim you are correct. Stalybridge had a strong involvement with Alex Owen and James Melling who helped the birth of the brass band as a encouraging medium for amateur musicians, maybe this was more important?
     
  13. AEHOWGATE

    AEHOWGATE Member

    Thanks :0) I agree, the development of Alex Owen as principal cornet at Stalybridge was very important indeed and also the association with composer James Melling too. Its a shame 'Orynthia' has not been unearthed yet. But the thread is about the oldest bands. I have great memories of hearing Stalybridge under Earnest Woodhouse in the days of the turquoise jackets.
     
  14. tony winterbottom

    tony winterbottom New Member

    The more that I have looked in to Stalybridge Bands' history the muddier it gets. Going off at tangent though it's worth noting that Boarshurst Band acquired St. Hilda's Colliery Band library some years ago. I bet there are some hidden gems in that lot!
    Good luck with the band. Cheers Tony
     
  15. AEHOWGATE

    AEHOWGATE Member

    yes! But St Hilda, whilst being a very famous name were formed as late as 1869 and didn't come to prominence till the first decade of the 20th century. I hope the library wasn't plundered before Boarshurst recieved it. They had a good few composers and arrangers act as conductor for the band including William Halliwell,Johnny Greenwood, Hubert Bath and Frank Wright so its well worth a dig in there. Besses or mossley may have orynthia. Orynthia was used at Belle Vue in 1855. I will look up the list of competing bands and ask around.
     
  16. KMJ Recordings

    KMJ Recordings Supporting Member

    AFAIK Aidan, Besses didn't have Orynthia - wasn't Ray Farr looking for it a while ago?
     
  17. AEHOWGATE

    AEHOWGATE Member

    yes Ray Farr did have a look for it. Its still worth a hunt. I need to find where the competing bands libraries ended up. Im sure a few sets of orynthia have seen the inside of skips without anybody knowing what they have thrown away. Who knows? It may be out there somewhere.
     
  18. Frontman

    Frontman Member

    Boarshurst Band celebrate their 160 years in existance this year. They were formed as a Brass Band in 1849 and have been constant. Unlike some bands who have disbanded and reformed under the same name but still declare their original formation date.
     
  19. mikelyons

    mikelyons Supporting Member

    Eagley Band in Bolton is 160 in 2010
     

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