Trombone advice

Discussion in 'The Rehearsal Room' started by teletext45, Jan 29, 2014.

  1. teletext45

    teletext45 New Member

    Hey Ladies and Gents.

    I'm on the look out for a new trombone in the not so distance future. I'm currently playing a Yamaha YSL354 student model and looking to up grade from this. Ive been advised either a Bach or Conn pre 1990s is a good opition but not sure on the models. Can anyone recomend some instrument models which are worth looking out for?

    Thanks in advance

    andy
     
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  3. MoominDave

    MoominDave Well-Known Member

    Depends what you are doing with it... There are basically two different trends in modern tenor trombone usage - small (jazz) and large (orchestral/band) - these categories don't fit every player exactly, but they're pretty close.

    The YSL354 is actually a pretty good trombone - they have been played professionally, and will certainly work for you in contexts where a smaller trombone bore is wanted.
    So what do you want in a trombone? What groups do you want to able to use it with (i.e. what type of trombonists will you need to blend your sound with)? Do you want a broader tone quality (or maybe a brighter one)? Do you want an F trigger (pros and cons depending on what notes you have to play)? What qualities do you prize in the sound you aim for?

    In brass bands, people go for large trombones these days. The relevant Bach triggered model is the 42B (42 without trigger), while the relevant Conn model is the 88H (8H without trigger). The "pre 1990s" advice you quote is distinctly questionable - for example, Conn is generally held to have improved in the early 90s, after losing quality in the early 70s, exactly the opposite of that advice - but you still find plenty of nice 70s and 80s Conns around. Don't ever write an instrument off just because it doesn't fit whatever theories of quality are currently fashionable.
     
  4. oliwlliams

    oliwlliams New Member

    When I was looking for a new trombone...I went down to John Packers and tried out 8 or 9 different trombones, and tested them. And picked the best one for me...a Courtois AC440 Legend :) People say ooh this trombone is better than that trombone. But at the end of the day its you that has to play it not them. Organise with a music shop to test out a few trombones and pick the one that suits best for you :)
     
  5. nethers

    nethers Active Member

    Also, don't forget second hand and saving some money! For the price of a new trombone I own two glorious Elkhart era Conns (8H and 88H), one looks like it came out of the factory yesterday, the other like it is 2 years old and carefully used.

    But oliwilliams says it all really, don't be sucked in by fashions and brand names, decide on the sound and feel you want and play lots of trombones until you find a match. If that ends up being a p-bone with a clarinet reed jammed in to the lead pipe, play it with pride!

    Don't feel forced in to large-bore either if it's uncomfortable, I know a great trombonist in a top section band in the midlands who plays a medium bore and has a sound that will bury all but a very few elite players. I also know a local player in NZ, again very talented, who can make a bass trombone sound like a latin jazz player on a pea-shooter.
     
  6. teletext45

    teletext45 New Member

    I'm most def looking at used because i feel i'll more then likely get better value. I'm currently split between a regular tenor but going to medium bore or getting a trigger trombone to give me more options. My main reason for possibly getting moving on from my Yamaha is that it is got a few spots of rust on the slide and a small dint. It' doesn't affect the slide at the moment, but I'm feeling it's going to get worse and rather then spending a lot of money on repairs, it would be worth putting it into another instrument. My problem as a musician is i play in a mixture of orchestral sort of groups and a soul band, so need something really versatile. My budget isn't huge, probably around £400.
     
  7. Sad to say, but for that sort of money you are not likely to find anything worthwhile. You might be better spending it on your slide.
     
  8. MoominDave

    MoominDave Well-Known Member

    The best solution to playing in a mix of large- and small-bore applications is to have two trombones. You already have a decent one on the small side - as suggested, if your slide is imperfect spend £50 on making it better.

    For a cheap large-bore w/ or w/o F attachment, you could do worse far worse than chat to this chap, even if he would have to ship from the US:
    http://tromboneforum.org/index.php/topic,75006.0.html - topic posted 4 hours ago, but he has a regular large turnover of interesting cheap trombones. Prices are in dollars, of course, but after import, pound prices will be getting on towards those numbers.

    If you look diligently and know what to avoid, with patience you can find good large-bore F-attachment instruments for a £400 budget. But I would probably aim to save up more than that - gives you more options and reduces the odds of picking up something that at first seemed good but actually has a major issue. Once you get past about £600, you'll find things are much easier.
     
  9. MoominDave

    MoominDave Well-Known Member

    Reading that back (written in a hurry just before heading out), I realise that I wrote "The best solution" when it would have been better to write "The most usual satisfactory solution". Some use the same instrument in both types of setting - and a medium-bore can do that mix of jobs (e.g. King 3B for medium-small or Bach 36 for medium-large) - but it involves not doing either quite how people expect them to be done.
     
  10. The Wherryman

    The Wherryman Active Member

    Where is the rust appearing? If it is just some slight pitting on the stockings, my YSL354 has got that and I was advised that some of the early models came out of the factory like that! Mine hasn't got any worse and I don't even think about it now.
     
  11. iffytboner

    iffytboner Member

    I picked up a Bach 36B for £500 on ebay last year. With the right mouthpiece, it's a brilliant all rounder.

    I also subscribe to the theory that 90%+ of the sound that comes out of the bell is generated in your head

    Iain
     
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  13. Ianroberts

    Ianroberts Well-Known Member

    this bloke may be able to help..............





































    [​IMG]
     
  14. teletext45

    teletext45 New Member

  15. 2nd tenor

    2nd tenor Active Member

    My main reason for possibly getting moving on from my Yamaha is that it is got a few spots of rust on the slide and a small dint. It' doesn't affect the slide at the moment, but I'm feeling it's going to get worse and rather then spending a lot of money on repairs, it would be worth putting it into another instrument. My problem as a musician is i play in a mixture of orchestral sort of groups and a soul band, so need something really versatile. My budget isn't huge, probably around £400.
    Most trombonists have a back-up instrument, to play in less safe places and for when their best trombone isn't available. I suggest that you get the Yamaha sorted out first and keep it for that purpose - a bit of plating loss off of the slide is no big issue really, particularly with the right lubricant. The smaller bores like your Yamaha play well (richer) with a Bach 6 1/2 AL or Wick 6 BS, get a second hand one off of ebay. Some bands provide instruments so do you really need to buy, to get something decent you'll normally need to spend more than £400. Yamaha's YSL 446 and 448 are thought to be good intermediate trombones.
     
  16. Euphman2

    Euphman2 Member

    I wanted a trombone of my own when I retired (age 50) and I started playing with a veterans band (minimum joining age 50 years). I cannot tell where you live but I went Gear4music near York, realised what I went for was not a suitable fit for my euph DW 4AL mouthpiece, so tried some options and bought a Coppergate Bb/F tenor trombone with stand and music stand for £265:00p (there was an offer on that week). It would not suit a really serious trombone player, but as this is my second instrument, it suffices for my needs and sounds okay when I have played it at 3rd section level as a stand in.
    For the record, I have played solo trom at a serious level in the past so I am not talking through my bo**om.
     

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