Translating Southern United States to English

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Chat' started by Dave Payn, Jun 29, 2004.

  1. Dave Payn

    Dave Payn Active Member

    All in good jest, no offence intended to our USA contributors! ;-)

    Translating Southern United States to English
    BARD - verb. Past tense of the infinitive "to borrow."
    Usage: "My brother bard my pickup truck."

    JAWJUH - noun. A highly flammable state just north of Florida.
    Usage: "My brother from Jawjah bard my pickup truck."

    MUNTS - noun. A calendar division.
    Usage: "My brother from Jawjuh bard my pickup truck, and I aint herd from him in munts."

    IGNERT - adjective. Not smart. See "Auburn Alumni."
    Usage: "Them N-C-TWO-A boys sure are ignert!"

    RANCH - noun. A tool.
    Usage: "I think I left my ranch in the back of that pickup truck my brother from Jawjuh bard a few munts ago."

    ALL - noun. A petroleum-based lubricant.
    Usage: "I sure hope my brother from Jawjuh puts all in my pickup truck."

    FAR - noun. A conflagration.
    Usage: "If my brother from Jawjuh doesn't change the all in my pickup truck, that things gonna catch far."

    BAHS - noun. A supervisor.
    Usage: "If you don't stop reading these Southern words and git back to work, your bahs is gonna far you!"

    TAR - noun. A rubber wheel.
    Usage: "Gee, I hope that brother of mine from Jawjuh doesn't git a flat tar in my pickup truck."

    TIRE - noun. A tall monument.
    Usage: "Lord willing and the creeks don't rise, I sure do hope to see that Eiffel Tire in Paris sometime."

    HOT - noun. A blood-pumping organ.
    HOD - adverb. Not easy. Usage: "A broken hot is hod to fix."

    RETARD - Verb. To stop working.
    Usage: "My granpaw retard at age 65."

    TARRED - adverb. Exhausted.
    Usage: "I just flew in from Hot-lanta, and boy my arms are tarred."

    RATS - noun. Entitled power or privilege.
    Usage: "We Southerners are willing to fight for out rats."

    LOT - adjective. Luminescent.
    Usage: "I dream of Jeanie in the lot-brown hair."

    FARN - adjective. Not local.
    Usage: "I cudnt unnerstand a wurd he sed ... must be from some farn country."

    DID - adjective. Not alive.
    Usage: "He's did, Jim."

    EAR - noun. A colorless, odorless gas (unless you are in LA).
    Usage: "He can't breathe ... give 'em some ear!"

    BOB WAR - noun. A sharp, twisted cable.
    Usage: "Boy, stay away from that bob war fence."

    JU-HERE - a question.
    Usage: "Juhere that former Dallas Cowboys' coach Jimmy Johnson recently toured the University of Alabama?"

    HAZE - a contraction.
    Usage: "Is Bubba smart?" "Nah ... haze ignert."

    SEED - verb, past tense.
    VIEW - contraction: verb and pronoun.
    Usage: "I ain't never seed New York City ... view?"

    HEAVY DEW - phrase. A request for action.
    Usage: "Kin I heavy dew me a favor?"

    GUMMIT - Noun. An often-closed bureaucratic institution.
    Usage: "Great ... ANOTHER gummit shutdown!"
     
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  3. DublinBass

    DublinBass Supporting Member

    No offense taken. I actually have some family in JAWJUH and when when go to the local establishments for beverages I am often unable to understand the locals once they've had a few drinks.

    Here's another

    YUNTO - would you like to... as in "YUNTO go to the bar"
     
  4. Will the Sec

    Will the Sec Active Member

    Go to visit Anne in Houston, Dave.

    It's twice as funny as that...
     
  5. EIBB_Ray

    EIBB_Ray Member

    Those of us in the North (or Nawth) have fun with these too.

    The true test of Southern Language Knowledge is if you know how to make "Y'all" plural.....
     
  6. andywooler

    andywooler Supporting Member

  7. EIBB_Ray

    EIBB_Ray Member

    Since no one tried, I'll fill in the blank.

    The plural of Y'all is "all y'all" Y'alls is used sometimes, but that's more often the possessive y'all's (I seen y'alls pitcher in the newspaper the other day.) I rather than plural.
     

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