Titanium Mouthpieces

Discussion in 'The Rehearsal Room' started by brassneck, Feb 20, 2005.

  1. brassneck

    brassneck Active Member

  2. Craigsav83

    Craigsav83 Active Member

    Sounds really expensive.....
     
  3. brassneck

    brassneck Active Member

    ... thing is, they are suitable and guaranteed for people who have skin allergies! Nice design too! Must be superlight as well!
     
  4. Craigsav83

    Craigsav83 Active Member

    Wots 129.00 euros in sterling? Is that expensive for a mouthpiece? I've actually err never bought one!
     
  5. brassneck

    brassneck Active Member

  6. brassneck

    brassneck Active Member

    These mouthpieces are pricey but can be custom made to replicate your favourite mouthpiece. Would anybody part with their hard-earned dosh if they had an allergy problem?
     
  7. WoodenFlugel

    WoodenFlugel Moderator Staff Member

    Funnily enough I looked at this link last night too. Apart from the awful company name I think it's an interesting concept. I was trying to remember the exact properties of titanium but basically couldn't, except that it's very light, strong for its weight, an absolute bitch to work with (small chips tend to burst into flame when machining it :shock: ) and, as you say the nly real non-allergenic metal - which is why joint replacements are made from it.

    Oh and it's also expensive and this coupled with the machining problems probably account for the slightly steep pricetag.

    Mind you I paid 65 quid for my traditional brass & sliver mouthpiece about 10 yeahs ago...
     
  8. Jan H

    Jan H Moderator Staff Member

    It's used quite a lot in Formula 1 cars for example, to save weight.
    (and money isn't an issue for them...)
     
  9. HorniKaz

    HorniKaz Supporting Member

    Titanium is also used in spectacle frames. Strong, lightweight & hypoallergenic!
     
  10. WoodenFlugel

    WoodenFlugel Moderator Staff Member

    Yup I know....and I've used it a couple of times in very high speed mechanisms for the same reasons. I guess it's main advantage for a mouthpiece material is the hypoallergenic properties it has.
     
  11. theMouthPiece Visitor Guide

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    Titanium Mouthpieces
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    wooden mouthpieces
    stainless steel
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  12. brassneck

    brassneck Active Member

    One of my watches is made of titanium. Looks cool but it's weight makes it feel cheaper than it is.

    I noticed that some of the mouthpieces are coated with gold titanium. Is it possible to plate brass with the metal? Would save costs if someone needed a hypo-allergenic material to continue playing.
     
  13. ScrapingtheBottom

    ScrapingtheBottom Active Member

    What's gold titanium, is it an alloy of gold and titanium (sounds expensive!). I met a trumpet player (who was also a metal finisher) and he plated his mouthpiece in electrum (gold-silver alloy) he said it was a good mix of durability and heat conductivity.
     
  14. Jan H

    Jan H Moderator Staff Member

    That's actually the reason why I bought a Titanium watch, rather then a steel one (which are normally cheaper). I don't like such a heavy weight on my arm. I also like the mat dark grey colour, by which you (and other people ;) ) can recognize the titanium.
     
  15. Laserbeam bass

    Laserbeam bass Active Member

    £89 that's cheap compared to the bass mouthpieces, and they don't even have one that compares to my current mouthpiece. They want £164.00 for one. I suppose that if it were for somebody with an allergy to certain metals it would be worthwhile, but how many bass players have allergies. not many as it would hurt like ****!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  16. brassneck

    brassneck Active Member

    "TITANOVATION mouthpieces are available as follows:
    "standard" - titanium finish, highly polished: broad and warm sound
    "hp" (high projection) - titanium with a gold-colored titanium coating, highly polished: brilliant, highly centered sound"

    ... looks like the color is not restricted to gold with use of anodizing!


    http://www.cascadiadesignstudio.com/faq-anodize-titanium.htm
     
  17. WoodenFlugel

    WoodenFlugel Moderator Staff Member

    OOO just think you could have a fuschia coloured mouthpiece :eek: . Actually the royal blue would go nicely with our uniforms....:rolleyes:

    I was just about to say that you could anodize it pretty much any colour - although I'm not sure how that would affect the hypoallergenic properties of it. The matt grey that most people think of is actually an anodised finish - naturally (well machined anyway) it's a sort of whitey-silvery colour.

    Do they do flugel mouthpieces btw??
     
  18. ScrapingtheBottom

    ScrapingtheBottom Active Member

    I presume the colour doesn't effect the sound, I can't think that a 50 - 200 nm thick layer will greatly alter sound production. Wear might be a problem with these mouthpieces as you may see discolouration. I'm not sure how resitant the TiO2 layer of such thickness is to mechanical wear.
     
  19. brassneck

    brassneck Active Member

    I think there could be a massive market for this company if they can reduce the costs! :wink: (... I want my cut!)
     
  20. ScrapingtheBottom

    ScrapingtheBottom Active Member

    How thick is a standard anodised oxide layer, Ian?
     
  21. brassneck

    brassneck Active Member

    "The anodize process passes an electrical current through the titanium, forming a transparent titanium-oxide layer on the ring's surface. The oxide thickness determines the color and is set by the applied voltage. The iridescent colors are formed by the refraction of light off of, and through this transparent oxide layer, essentially a 50 to 200 nanometer thick prism."


    p.s., d'ye like my timely change of avatar?
     
  22. theMouthPiece Visitor Guide

    Find more discussions like this one
    Titanium Mouthpieces
    polymer
    wooden mouthpieces
    stainless steel
    link

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