Silent Brass - alternative earphones?

Discussion in 'The Rehearsal Room' started by VegasGeorge, Jan 8, 2014.

  1. VegasGeorge

    VegasGeorge Member

    I love using my Yamaha Silent Brass system. But the earphones that came with it annoy me. Like most earbuds, they don't want to stay in my ear, and the sound quality I get is marginal. I've tried several other earphones and headsets I have around the house, but the sound is very weak out of them. I'm no audio tach, but I suspect what I'm hearing is impedance mismatch. Does anyone here have a tried and proven alternative to the earphones that came with the SB system? Thanks!
     
  2. Ianroberts

    Ianroberts Well-Known Member

    What instrument are you playing ?
     
  3. VegasGeorge

    VegasGeorge Member

    Tenor Horn, but that shouldn't have anything to do with the matching of a headphone to the Silent Brass system. They use the same model ST9 for various instruments. Only the mutes are different. I'm just looking for confirmed recommendations for alternative headphones that work well with the ST9 Personal Studio, which is what Yamaha calls the little amp device.
     
  4. Ianroberts

    Ianroberts Well-Known Member

    Try a cushion

    ;)
     
  5. VegasGeorge

    VegasGeorge Member

    What? Could I use the same cushion I use for my hemorrhoids? I don't see how sitting on a cushion will help.
     
  6. Ianroberts

    Ianroberts Well-Known Member

    Try it for 1 week
     
  7. VegasGeorge

    VegasGeorge Member

    OK, I've sat on this stupid doughnut for a week, but I don't see any improvement in the mouthpiece slippage problem. Any other suggestions?
     
  8. Ianroberts

    Ianroberts Well-Known Member

    2 cushions ?
     
  9. VegasGeorge

    VegasGeorge Member

    OK, Ian. Now I think you're trying to pull an old man's leg. Just because we're related doesn't give you such privilege.
     
  10. Ianroberts

    Ianroberts Well-Known Member

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  12. VegasGeorge

    VegasGeorge Member

    Possibly! Did she travel with the circus?
     
  13. Ianroberts

    Ianroberts Well-Known Member

    No, but she was once married to a zookeeper
     
  14. VegasGeorge

    VegasGeorge Member

    Pappy !
     
  15. Ianroberts

    Ianroberts Well-Known Member

    Have you had any sensible replies yet ?
     
  16. Capt. Z

    Capt. Z Member

    Well, you would need some headphones that have a low impedance and a high sensitivity, meaning they can play loud with little power, or you could put a headphone amplifier in between (C-moy comes to mind)

    Bellow is a post on headphone sensitivity, which I copied and pasted from head-fi.org

    The sensitivity rating is usually for 1 milliwatt POWER input to the phones and a corresponding sound pressure level (SPL) output (USUALLY 102 to 106 dB SPL output for moderate to high sensitivity rated phones).

    However, connecting different sets of phones with the same 1 milliwatt to SPL output sensitivity rating to the same headphones amplifier output may, or may not give corresponding equal or loud enough SPL operation!

    The impedance (the ohms rating of the phones voice coil) determines how much audio 'voltage' needs be applied to get that '1 milliwatt' or more power into the phone's motor circuit.

    For example: A low 16 to 45 ohm headphone (low ohms impedance that's typical for Sony headphones) will easily get to operate for many milliwatts for providing close to live loudness on battery powered portable equipment that typically output only .5-1.5 volts RMS volts output.

    A 65 to 600 ohms phones set impedance (higher ohms typical of Sennheiser, Beyer, & AKG headphones). will require a higher headphones amplifier output voltage signal to get the same milliwatts into the phones voice coil for providing equal loudness.
     
  17. VegasGeorge

    VegasGeorge Member

    Thanks Capt. Z. I used to think that all earbuds were the same as far as compatibility goes. Obviously, some are better designed to fit and or to sound better. But I thought that any earbud would work reasonably well with any device with an earphone output. But the Silent Brass unit had put a hole in that theory. So far, the only earbuds that work worth a darn are the ones that Yamaha provided with the unit. I'm trying to digest and understand your post. Apparently, I need to go back to the specs of the Silent Brass unit as a starting point.
     
  18. Capt. Z

    Capt. Z Member

    An additional idea would be to look at ear-speakers that are actually inserted in your ear channel.

    Though they are not for everyone, they do offer some isolation to outside noise and let you hear more of the ear-speaker.

    Sensitivity of speakers or headphones is totally underrated.

    In my man-cave I have two sets of speakers with 2 different amplifiers.

    System one is made up of a 45 watt amp and speaker with 90 db efficiency and System two is made up of a 15 watt amp with 95 db efficiency.
     
  19. Capt. Z

    Capt. Z Member

    An additional idea would be to look at ear-speakers that are actually inserted in your ear channel.

    Though they are not for everyone, they do offer some isolation to outside noise and let you hear more of the ear-speaker.

    Sensitivity of speakers or headphones is totally underrated.

    In my man-cave I have two sets of speakers with 2 different amplifiers.

    System one is made up of a 45 watt amp and speaker with 90 db sensitivity and System two is made up of a 15 watt amp with 95 db sensitivity.

    Even though system two has only 15 watts, it plays MUCH louder then system one with more then double the power.

    I don't know the sensitivity of the Yamaha ear-buds, but you may want to look into headphones with about 105 - 110 db efficiency.

    Or try the in-the-ear-phone, which will eliminate some of the outside noise and therefore you will hear more of the in-the-ear-phone.

    Also, their are headphones that are open and closed, meaning they will give you some insulation from the outside.

    A closed headphone is closed off on the rear side, keeping the sound inside.

    A opened headphone is open on the back and will let sound out and outside noise in.

    (Just a wee bit more info to confuse you a little more)
     

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