Odd Instrument.

Discussion in 'The Rehearsal Room' started by Cornet Nev., May 15, 2007.

  1. Cornet Nev.

    Cornet Nev. Member

    I have had for some time now, perhaps a year or two, an instrument that even the music shop owner wasn't sure what it was, but he sold it to me fairly cheap. It is bigger than, but similar shape to a trumpet, has a largish bell, chrome plated, and absolutely no markings as to who made it, nor any serial number. The only numbers are the usual valve position numbers-12&3. A low "C" sounds a concert pitch "G" below the normal cornet "B flat" therefore somewhere between "E flat" tenor horn and cornet in pitch. So therefore it is in "G" I assume. My cornet, a Bach, is above it, to give an idea of size. The valves are top sprung, with pip and groove type location.
    Any ideas any one?
     

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  2. Anno Draconis

    Anno Draconis Well-Known Member

    Could be Russian or East European - some Soviet/Russian orchestras used to use low G trumpets. Rare as rocking horse poo, so keep hold of it!
     
  3. Harold.Wells

    Harold.Wells Active Member

    My guess is that this is some kind of American marching instrument. The American marching bands widely use instruments in G. It's unusual shape and large bell points to it perhaps being an "alto horn".
    I have a collection of unusual instruments, amongst them a few American marching bugles (mainly in G) - some with one, some with two piston valves, as well as one with 1 piston and 1 rotary valve.
     
  4. Aussie Tuba

    Aussie Tuba Member

    it lookes similar to the Flugel Horn used in brassed off .
     
  5. brassneck

    brassneck Active Member

    It's been described elsewhere as a frumpet! :rolleyes:
     
  6. Mesmerist

    Mesmerist Well-Known Member

    we`ve got a thing with 2 valves the size of a small baritone/large flugel but not in b Flat. we use it as a flower pot on the wall outside our house. Apparently it is a Mellophone (don`t know how it is spelt)...
     
  7. towse1972

    towse1972 Active Member

    (Aherm...) Oooooh.... It's worth nothing... honest.. market price? £2.50...(thats a top end offer!).... I will give a fiver for it! I cany go any further...
     
  8. bennem

    bennem Member

    Is it a bass trumpet? Can be pitched in C, Bb or Eb according to Wikipedia
     
  9. Anglo Music Press

    Anglo Music Press Active Member

    Confirming the post above, this seems to be a drum and bugle corps instrument:-

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drum_and_bugle_corps_(modern)

    At that pitch, I don't know (or care!) if it counts as a trumpet or alto horn/mellophone.

    These groups (until about 7 years ago) traditionally used all instruments pitched in G with front-facing bells. There are a few corps in the UK but mostly they are to be found in the US.

    Having attended a rehearsal of one playing a piece of mine a few years ago, I can confirm they look better than they sound.........

    :rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2007
  10. brassneck

    brassneck Active Member

    - which could mean that it is an early frumpet? It would help if we knew the make ... Getzen? ;)

    http://www.alsmiddlebrasspages.com/mellophone/bellfront.html
     
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  12. Bass Trumpet

    Bass Trumpet Active Member

    Probably an Alto trumpet, then! Don't believe everything you see on Wikipedia. Bass trumpets are usually pitched in C or Bb, but the music is written in Bb, B, C, D, Eb, E or F. Quite a headache for the transposition.

    By the way, is that awful picture of me playing one still on Wiki? The photographer caught me breathing in, so I look like I've got mumps!
     
  13. tintineuph

    tintineuph New Member

    In this case, Wikipedia is totally correct. It is a G trumpet.

    I was part of that group of people that Mr Spark 'attended' the rehearsal of a few years ago.

    Thankyou Mr Spark for your 'kind' words.
     
  14. Anglo Music Press

    Anglo Music Press Active Member

    This was indeed the kindest way of putting it - though I'd be surprised if you were there as it was in Alabama. If you were, welcome to our wonderful country!
     
  15. 84BDSop

    84BDSop New Member

    Given that drum corps tour all around the US during the summer, being in Alabama is no big deal.

    Would you care to name -- if not the corps -- the selection they were playing? I seem to recall the Cadets performing "Celebration" pretty well in 97....and they don;t have a bad horn line.

    As for the horns pictured....they are not G bugles. The 3rd valve was not added until 1990, and when they DID come out, they looked more like compact trumpets (just look at the bugles on the Kanstul site)

    To say the horns were bad ignores the skills of the musician behind the mouthpiece...makes all the difference.
     

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