Musical Terms

Discussion in 'The Rehearsal Room' started by BbBill, Jan 29, 2005.

  1. BbBill

    BbBill Supporting Member

    Seeing as my mother has misplaced/lost/given away the books I had for my theory a few years ago, I was wondering if anybody knew of any websites that give a full list of musical terms for quick reference?

    Theres a few terms appearing in pieces that my sieve of a brain has forgotton, must be getting old!!! :rolleyes:

    Ta very much!
     
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  3. Andy_Euph

    Andy_Euph Active Member

    Try Google...can find nearly anything through Google!
     
  4. brassneck

    brassneck Active Member

  5. HorniKaz

    HorniKaz Supporting Member

  6. TIMBONE

    TIMBONE Active Member

    This thread has prompted me to ask a question. After many years as a musician, which has included a professional muisical education and employment, I came across the term slent. I had never seen it before, and it is not in the Oxford Musical Dictionary, so where did it come from? Is it exclusive to brass band music? I think this is a job for DAVID PAYN.
     
  7. brassneck

    brassneck Active Member

    ... nice one! (... there's a few I haven't seen before such as "The concertmaster of an orchestra is always the person who sits in the first chair of the first violins. This means that when a person is elected concertmaster, he has to hurry up and learn how to play a violin real good.")
     
  8. brassneck

    brassneck Active Member

    Slentando(Italian) rallentando, getting slower
    ... maybe it was an abbreviated version of above?
     
  9. TIMBONE

    TIMBONE Active Member

    Cheers brassneck. It's just that I can honestly say that the first and only time I saw the term slent, is in brass band music.
     
  10. brassneck

    brassneck Active Member

    I remember an inquiry when it came up in a piece a while back ... which one was it again? I was expected to 'know' when I turned up at practice, but ended up looking up foreign dictionaries to find out what it meant. I would prefer it if English translations were used for English publications of music. Saying that, any writer of music is entitled to describe in his/her own terms how the music should be expressed. :cool:

    p.s., it is included on the earlier link I supplied (maybe the most comprehensive collection of music theory terms I have come across!)
     
  11. pegleg

    pegleg Member

    I think you will find that slent (or slentando) usually only applies to the one bar over which it is written, and means that that bar is legato or stretched out (or slowed down) for either just that bar OR to the end of the dots ...........::) :)
     
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  13. TIMBONE

    TIMBONE Active Member

    Thanks pegleg
     
  14. brassneck

    brassneck Active Member

  15. ju33les

    ju33les Member


    Ahem...you must read your "Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music" you were awarded with in 1969 a little closer!!
    :-D
     
  16. BbBill

    BbBill Supporting Member

  17. Ginge

    Ginge Member

  18. HorniKaz

    HorniKaz Supporting Member

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