Lip problem

Discussion in 'The Rehearsal Room' started by yooflou, May 20, 2013.

  1. yooflou

    yooflou Member

    This may have been discussed before, but I have started to have a problem with the inside of my bottom lip. I seem to now have an area directly related to where the mouthpiece sits (I play baritone) that feels 'wrong'. A bit like the sharp taste of an ulcer but without the pain (thankfully). BUT it does affect my playing as it is 'drier' than the rest of the normal lip area inside and therefore is impacting on my playing flexibility. I have been playing for many many years, so not really sure why this should start now. I am not playing more, but I have changed bands and maybe playing harder/with more sound creating more pressure? Any thoughts on helping it heal/preventing it happening or any suggestions about anyone using a guard between the teeth and the lips (not sure how that would affect playing!) would be gratefully received.Thanks
     
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  3. pbirch

    pbirch Member

    sounds like a visit to your dentist is the thing to do, you might get some helpful (or not)comments here, but your dentist is best placed to help you.
    I am aways surprised by the number of brass and wind musicians who do not tell their dentist, or optician for that matter, about their playing and then struggle with mouth problems (and vision issues) and then go on to think that an internet chat forum might throw up the answer. A a rule, ulcers without pain should be taken seriously - see your dentist.
     
  4. yooflou

    yooflou Member

    Handily I have an appointment with the dentist this week so will certainly discuss it with him. Thank you. If you could recommend a good optician who understands a (marching) brass bander's particular problems I would be all sorted!!
     
  5. iffytboner

    iffytboner Member

    Should have gone to Specsavers? I did! I'm long-sighted and they sorted me out very nicely with music reading glasses and normal ones too at a fantastic price. Having said that, any optician should be able to help you. With so many about these days, they survive on their reputation
     
  6. yooflou

    yooflou Member

    I do go to Specsavers!!!!! LOL
     
  7. GordonH

    GordonH Member

    I sometimes get this, but I don't think its playing related. I suspect it would not even be noticed by people who don't play a brass instrument. Will be interested to hear what your dentist says about it.
     
  8. pbirch

    pbirch Member

    the answer is to tell them what you need, maybe take some music with you, it will help them to help you.
     
  9. GJG

    GJG Well-Known Member

    I know of several players (particularly those of "a certain age", ie. approaching the "starting to need varifocals" age group) who have found it very useful to take a music stand and some sheet music (a variety of styles) to the opticians appointment. I've done it myself with full scores, and my optician confirmed that it was helpful to understand the specific requirement.
     
  10. GordonH

    GordonH Member

    Absolutely.

    My mum is a retired optician and regularly did this for musicians.
    You get an extra set of reading glasses which focus at the distance of the stand rather than the distance you would read a book.
    This avoids the spectacle of middle aged men holding the music closer top see what the notes say!
     
  11. yooflou

    yooflou Member

    OK - my dentists opinion was that the area that is 'damaged' is usually as a result of trauma or prolonged rubbing.No one has taken a swipe at me and I haven't bashed my face with my mouthpiece since I was small so my conclusion is that it is most likely the latter. Still no real reason for why it should start now after years of playing though. The two suggestions from the dentist were to try pharmacist soft paraffin (thicker Vaseline) or Boots do a DIY version of mouth guards where you heat up the material provided and mould it to your teeth. It can then be cut to fit the area where protection is required. We both agreed that these may not work as the soft paraffin may not stay in place (I did try Vaseline but couldn't get it to spread!), and the guard may interfere too much with the feel of playing, but I will give it a go and let you know how I get on!
     
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  13. yooflou

    yooflou Member

    The soft paraffin didn't work......can't get it to stick! Using Iglu at the moment just to try and heal it - but not while I am playing! Next option is to try the Boots DIY mouth guard....
     
  14. GordonH

    GordonH Member

    Try using a toothpaste that does not include sodium lauryl sulphate. This is added to almost all modern toothpastes as a foaming agent. I was told by my dentist that it is an irritant and can slow the healing of soft tissue damage or turn tiny abrasions into ulcers.

    I use Sensodyne gentle whitening. The only other toothpaste I know of that does not contain this compound is corsodyl toothpaste.
    There used to be many more that did not include it, but people seem to like the whole foaming thing.

    Sodium lauryl sulphate was originally developed as an engine degreaser.
     

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