Late Starter

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by Jack E, Apr 2, 2016.

  1. Jack E

    Jack E Well-Known Member

    Yeowch! My stepfather worked with mules in the Army; NW frontier of India, along the border with Afghanistan, in the 1930s. From what he said, the old saying about "having a kick like an Army mule" was no exaggeration. I hope you make a speedy recovery, ISB - and thank you for your welcome.

    "Five miles with no roads or fences"; I think the only place I've seen land like that in our crowded little island is right up in the north of Scotland. Ho, hum.
     
  2. Mesmerist

    Mesmerist Well-Known Member

    I just knew you two would get along!
     
  3. Jack E

    Jack E Well-Known Member

    Smartie!! :)
     
  4. Independent Silver Band

    Independent Silver Band Active Member

    We got on the animals, and I never asked what band either of you are playing with. Wendy I still owe you some music. When I left the school I left everything I had done on that computer. I didn't realize it till it was too late.

    I am down to twenty three horses, ponies and mules now.
     
  5. Jack E

    Jack E Well-Known Member

    23? 23?? Sheesh - I found looking after one to be tough going, at times!

    When I was working at a place which bred working type draught horses (not show types), they had 34 horses there, and two and a half staff - but I looked after the lot single handed on Saturdays and Sundays through one winter. It was flat out, dawn till dusk, and I felt like a slave.

    Re. my band, ISB; I'm not good enough to play with the band, having only started last October, so I am still very much a learner; it's the Burbage Band, from Buxton, Derbyshire - and a great bunch they are, too!

    With best regards,

    Jack E.
     
  6. Independent Silver Band

    Independent Silver Band Active Member

    If I figure out how, I will send some pictures.
    I wish I were close enough to help with the horn.
     
  7. Jack E

    Jack E Well-Known Member

    The only way I can think of is to upload them to something like Photobucket or Flickr, and get the relevant link from that. I look forward to seeing them!

    Re. the horn; good wishes are always welcome, ISB. I'm a great believer in the power of thought, prayer, or good will - however you see it.

    With best regards,

    Jack
     
  8. Mesmerist

    Mesmerist Well-Known Member

    Hi Jack, we've got a horse addition in our family now. She is a smaller version of Brown Bob, sometimes sweet and chilled, other times naggy and scatty and freaked out by bicycles. She's a fast learner and very pretty, a definite character who will not be easily ignored. Bit like her young rider really.
     
  9. Independent Silver Band

    Independent Silver Band Active Member

    About three weeks agoI was thrown by my Lusitano that I am training and I am wondering if there is any truth to the rumor that I am getting too old. Ten years ago should could not have shaken me out of the saddle.
     
  10. Mesmerist

    Mesmerist Well-Known Member

    There is NO truth in that at all. Get yourself back in the saddle man, you are a great rider. :)
     
  11. Mesmerist

    Mesmerist Well-Known Member

    Actually while I have your attention my learned friends, what's the best (safest) way of teaching a novice rider and her horse to canter? Neither have yet done it. (Well obviously one has in a field by herself without a rider...)

    (The scars on her face have now healed. This was her when she first arrived. She is slimmer and smarter now!)
     
  12. Independent Silver Band

    Independent Silver Band Active Member

    I usually start by longuing the horse in a round pen. This will also help in teaching the horse it's leads. A larger round pen is a good place to start the rider. It is more involved than I can explain on here.
     
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  13. Mesmerist

    Mesmerist Well-Known Member

    I was thinking that too Bill, but I wondered if you used any other methods with all your experience. I once worked with a stunt rider whose horse happily used a narrow staircase to an upstairs hall to perform to the diners up there. (Best thing about that job was the horse, it certainly wasn't the pay or the customers!)
     
  14. Independent Silver Band

    Independent Silver Band Active Member

    It's a bit different with an experienced rider, because I would push the horse past the trot, into a gallop, then back it down gradually to the canter. By gradually, I am talking about a period of weeks. I f the horse has limited riding experience, one most be careful, because might buck when breaking into the gallop. I am getting older, so I favor longuing the horse more than I used to. I do this while the horse is saddled and bridled at first with r=the reins slightly slacked, and fastened to the girth about midway down the body. If the reins are too tight, it will be difficult urge it to speed. I hope this makes sense. I will PM you on facebook with my email. I will see if I have some pictures.
     
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  15. Mesmerist

    Mesmerist Well-Known Member

    Thank you Bill, and yes it does make sense. :)
     
  16. Mesmerist

    Mesmerist Well-Known Member

    We did a four/five mile circuit today with horse and rider having a lovely time walking and trotting. If it wasn't for the odd scary tractor/cyclist/dead leaf then I wouldn't need to accompany them on foot. Upside is I'm much fitter now! Tomorrow they are both off to an indoor school to go to the next level.
     
  17. Independent Silver Band

    Independent Silver Band Active Member

    Very good. Wish I were there to help.
     
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  18. Jack E

    Jack E Well-Known Member

    I think the safest way - if at all possible - is for at least one of the pair to be comfortable at canter first; in other words, let the rider get familiar with cantering on a horse which knows the ropes. As Bill says, the green horse may well throw in what looks like a buck when shifting up from trot to canter, but it would be fairer to say the horse hasn't got the hang of pushing off with the right amount of push from the hind leg, and overdoes it. It's a pity that so much emphasis is put on the leading foreleg, whereas the upward transition actually comes from the rear leg. If you try going from a standstill straight into trot or canter with no intermediate walk - can be done with a well-trained and well-muscled horse - you can really feel that push from the rear.

    All this adds up to the fact that a green horse has enough to deal with, trying to keep itself balanced for a trot - canter transition, without having to cope with a wobbly rider, too.

    The best tip of all, if you have one anywhere near you, is to get the rider to have a lesson or two on a mechanical horse; the speed at which you can learn when the instructor is standing right next to you - as compared to standing 10 yards away - is amazing. I had a single half hour session on one, and my regular riding instructor said it was astonishing to see the difference it made.

    From memory, I think you live somewhere round the Cheshire / Stockport area; if so, PM me, and I'll send you the details of the place I went to for my session on the mech. horse. The instructor there is absolutely top-notch, and really knows how to get the best out of the mech. horse to sort whatever your particular difficulties are.

    With best regards,

    Jack
     
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