keys

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Chat' started by savewaterdrinkbeer, Mar 4, 2005.

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which key sig's gont you like?

  1. #'s

    40 vote(s)
    76.9%
  2. b's

    9 vote(s)
    17.3%
  3. both

    3 vote(s)
    5.8%
  1. what do you hate the most #'s or b's or both?
     
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  3. HBB

    HBB Active Member

    Sharps for me...

    don't know why :oops:
     
  4. stephen2001

    stephen2001 Member

    I hate #s, especially if reading in Bass Clef!
     
  5. ju33les

    ju33les Member

    :biggrin: Nice one "Mr G#" !
    (as in missed another one!!)
    ;) :p
     
  6. Jan H

    Jan H Moderator Staff Member

    I especially hate E# and B#...

    ;)
     
  7. HBB

    HBB Active Member

    I hate double sharps (x) and double flats (bb) more!
     
  8. Maestro

    Maestro Active Member

    When playing a brass instrument it doesn't bother me whether I read flats or sharps. However, for some strange reason, when I play the piano and I have a piece in say B Major, I will always transpose it in my head and think of it as Cb Major. Perhaps I should ask Uncle duncan about this one. :confused: :confused:
     
  9. the fish

    the fish Member

    Most traditional brass band music seems to be in flat keys, therefore like most brass banders I hate sharps!!
     
  10. pegleg

    pegleg Member

    I don't mind either 2 sharps or 1 flat - but any more sharps or flats - no thanks ! I find my 5th position keeps changing places..anywhere within three inches of where it is supposed to be!
     
  11. cujo_134

    cujo_134 Member

    I hate sharps. I have a former clarinet player who sits beside me in band, one band practice i made the comment how I hated sharp keys, and she mentioned that she finds all brass players do. By the results of the polls so far, I'd have to agree with her.
     
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  13. HorniKaz

    HorniKaz Supporting Member

    It seems to be the consensus that #s are harder to read.... yep, got to agree. For some strange reason bs are much easier! & playing an Eb instrument, we've always got one less flat than everyone else (sop & Eb basses excluded!!)
     
  14. sterlingsop

    sterlingsop Member

    I find anything up to 5 flats ok (ish) to play, but can only manage a paltry 3 sharps before my head hurts!

    Practicing diminished 7ths helps, but is incredibly boring.......
     
  15. NeilW

    NeilW Member

    I'm with you there!

    "Hall of the Mountain King" (for some reason I ended up playing the bassoon part) which is in B Major at the beginning :redface:

    Neil.
     
  16. lottie4744

    lottie4744 Member

    Can't agree more...... I just get confused!
     
  17. Craigsav83

    Craigsav83 Active Member

    Contrary to most, I find it easier to read lots of barbed wire, rather than cricket bats. I find that alot of the wind band music I play has many sharps for some reason.
     
  18. Will the Sec

    Will the Sec Active Member

    Door keys. :biggrin:
     
  19. mikelyons

    mikelyons Supporting Member

    I voted for #'s, although I don't actually hate them, as a brass band player I find them more difficult to read than b's. However, when I play with orchestras, I find I'm used to them. Having a bass clef in front of the #'s seems to change them, somehow! :cool:

    I really hate it when composers/arrangers are not consistent or logical when they mix them together - that makes the music really hard to read.
     
  20. groovy

    groovy Active Member

    #'s for me too, cos you get used to 5 or 6 b's when playing in bass clef! The worst key sig ever was playing Borodin's Second Symphony - in tenor clef - when transposing to treble it was 7 sharps!!!!
     
  21. PeterBale

    PeterBale Moderator Staff Member

    As a sax player first of all, you tend to become imune to lots of sharp keys, especially when guitarists love to play in "A" or "E" (6 or 7 sharps if you're playing alto). I think it is probably largely for that reason that I have no hang-ups over key signatures (and if you've ever played bass trombone you get to see plenty of flats as well!)

    If you can get away from any psychological problems, there are often less changes in fingering if you're playing in sharp keys, as the 2nd valve just stays down all the time ;)
     
  22. trumpetmike

    trumpetmike Active Member

    I honestly don't mind. Sharps or flats are fine with me, although extremes of either become annoying (6 or more).

    The only proviso to that is if the part is needing to be transposed - then sharps start to hurt my brain, double sharps are even worse
     

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