Home Practice

Discussion in 'The Rehearsal Room' started by Farmer Giles, Sep 20, 2004.

  1. Farmer Giles

    Farmer Giles Member

    Hi all

    i have a bit of a problem.

    i have no problem with doing home practice, my problem is knowing what to practice !

    can anyone give me a bit of guidance on improving my technical ability please ?

    many thanks

    FG
     
  2. ronnie_the_lizard

    ronnie_the_lizard Active Member

    Arban, cover to cover (every night)
     
  3. brasscrest

    brasscrest Active Member

    Get some good exercise books (Arban, St.-Jacome, Herbert L. Clarke, etc).
    Most of these are in sections that each develop a particular skill. Start at the beginning of each section and work your way through, when you get to the end, go back to the beginning. Some things (like an Arban's characteristic study) may take several sessions to get through before moving on.

    Also, make sure that you're practicing something that develops tone as well as fingers. I use the Rochut "Melodious Etudes for Trombone" series on low brass, there are similar series for upper brass. One a day, or one to reasonable quality and then move on.

    I also have at least one solo that I'm "working up" at any particular time, even if I don't have a chance of actually performing it.

    Be careful when practicing bits from your band pieces - practice makes permanent more than it makes perfect. Make sure you understand how the MD wants a passage played before woodshedding it.

    Warm up properly.

    Use a metronome when appropriate.
     
  4. lynchie

    lynchie Active Member

    If you can get together a collection of study books, such as one for technique, a set of warm up exercises, and a book on legato slurs (I don't know if they do those for other instruments, but I've got about 3!) then you can pick exercises from each one each day. I'd leave playing through your solo stuff until near the end, unless you're working it up for something specific and you need to do a lot on it. General practice tends to be much more constructive than directed practice on one piece.
     
  5. davidquinlan

    davidquinlan Member

    Get yourself a copy of Howard Snells book "The Trumpet". There is a very good chapter on practice that applies to any instrument.
     
  6. GJG

    GJG Well-Known Member

    ... and remember, above all, if you sound good when you practise, you're probably practising the wrong things.

    G.

    [PS: and another thing; how do you put those smiley-things into the posts? and why can't I find anyway of using italics/bold text? am I just exceptionally dense? ... ]
     
  7. Naomi McFadyen

    Naomi McFadyen New Member

    Arban...

    Scales... (including: chromatic, arpegio, major/minor... etc... start slow, get quicker)...

    Flexibility exercises...

    etc etc etc!!!!

    :-D ;)
     

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