Help fingering for Baritone

Discussion in 'The Rehearsal Room' started by abbie36, Dec 14, 2015.

  1. abbie36

    abbie36 New Member

    I have been lent by my local band what I was told is a baritone horn to try and a book called A Tune a Day. I have never played a brass instrument before but am keen to learn and very self motivated. For the last two weeks I have been trying to learn the first few notes but am totally confused. The fingering in the book doesn't seem to be the same as demos I have watched on U-tube. Could anyone please steer me towards the definitive fingering chart so that I can at least look like I have been trying before I go to my first beginners band meeting tomorrow. I am looking at notation written in the treble clef. eg In the book C is open; D is 1 & 2; E is 2; F is Open; G is 1. BUT on the Utube demo which incidently I did have some success with, the fingering is Bflat is open; C is 1 & 3; D is 1 & 2; Eflat is 1; F is open. HELP.................................
     
  2. Euphman2

    Euphman2 Member

    Totally confused by what you have written but I suspect your Utube demo is in concert pitch but the fingering you noted from tune a day is weird and to me does not make sense in brass band terms. Tune a day is a book many brass band players learn from but I believe the series covers other than brass band notation.
    In brass bands generally
    O = C G E
    1 = F Bb D
    2 = B F# Eb (high)
    1 & 3 = D G
    Hope this helps as it is not an exhaustive list but more of a pointer
     
  3. abbie36

    abbie36 New Member

    Thank you for taking the time to reply but still somewhat confused! Perhaps I need to find a brass teacher to guide me on the right path.
     
  4. Euphman2

    Euphman2 Member

     
  5. Euphman2

    Euphman2 Member

    Whereabouts in the country are you? There must be a local brass band near to you. I only ask as few people in brass bands refer to it as a baritone HORN, it's a baritone.
     
  6. Elwood

    Elwood New Member

  7. 2nd tenor

    2nd tenor Active Member

    It is hard to say from a distance what has happened but the details seemingly given to you in the book and on you tube aren't correct for brass band use, please say if you play in another type of band as that could change the advice offered to you. You tube refers, I suspect, to Concert pitch which you might not need to know about for years and maybe never.

    Please check the cover of the book you have been given. Mine is a very old copy, it says: " A Tune a Day for Trombone or Euphonium (Baritone) by C. Paul Herfurth" in one place on the cover and in an other "Treble Clef Edition". Yours should say something similar, a Trumpet or Cornet version will be fine. On page one of my version there is a full page spread of treble clef note names, their position on the stave and the valves to use.

    Having a teacher is always helpful but at this stage I think you could very reasonably seek clarification from a couple of players in the band, etc.
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2015
  8. GordonH

    GordonH Member

    My advice is to learn to pitch between notes like C and G (which have the same fingering) before introducing valves. This helps you get the concept of how the instrument works as well. Spending some time on mouthpiece first would also be a good idea. I am sure this is how my son learned to play, it was how I started back in the mists of time.
     
  9. abbie36

    abbie36 New Member

    Just had a look at my book and it is A Tune A Day for French Horn (F and Bb) and Tenor Horn (Eb)
     
  10. KenIrvin

    KenIrvin Member

    I use Standard of Excellence books for my Learners Group. Its more up to date than Tune a Day and you can buy the enhanced version with a CD or download MP3 of all the excercises.
     
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  12. GordonH

    GordonH Member

    The current Tune-a-Day has a CD and has been rewritten. Or at least the alto sax version is (my guilty secret).
     
  13. 2nd tenor

    2nd tenor Active Member

    IMHO such a widely split use version of Tune a Day (TAD) has significant chance of causing confusion to the self taught Baritone player. I take it that you play (or are preparing to) in a Brass Band and therefore suggest that you buy a copy for Euphonium/Baritone in Treble Clef, they are often available second hand on ebay for relatively little - as before the Trumpet/Cornet version should serve your purposes too. In my experience book one (of TAD) will get you well started and capable of joining in with a group and the follow on book two I found helpful too. There are other Tutor Books but TAD has worked well for so many people that, IMHO, there is no real point in taking a risk with anything else - if it ain't broke then don't fix it.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2015
  14. abbie36

    abbie36 New Member

    Thanks everyone. My friend from the band came over to help today and gave me the correct fingering. Evidently the Utube fingering was for concert pitch. So I am back on target and will be attending the beginners band practice this week. Hopefully if I try hard enough I may even meet my 6 year old grandaughters challenge of playing Jingle Bells for her before Christmas!! How many days have I got ! HELP
     
  15. MoominDave

    MoominDave Well-Known Member

    The fingering that is confusing everyone in the first post is for French horn using the Bb side, reading a part in F. Ignore any French horn stuff in the book, work from the tenor horn segments. French horn fingerings are different to all other brass instruments.

    To try to lay it all out straight, there are three different fingering systems in play in this thread, causing much confusion!
    1) The French horn Bb side reading F one in the first post - C open, D 1+2 etc.
    2) The concert pitch untransposed one in the YouTube demo - Bb open, C 1+3 etc.
    3) The actual one ("transposed") you want for brass band use, as suggested by people - C open, D 1+3, etc.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2015
  16. abbie36

    abbie36 New Member

    Brilliant you have made it all so clear. Wish I had this post 2 weeks ago it might have saved me a bit of fruitless practise.
     
  17. You are indeed looking at the fingerings for a Bb (french) horn.
     
  18. Accidental

    Accidental Supporting Member

    Yes, a thousand times!
    I've seen from helping a few self-taught adults that it is much, much harder to un-learn wrong info/technique and bad habits than to learn the right way in the first place. Its just not possible to replace face to face advice/teaching/guidance of real human beings with books and the internet imho.
     
  19. Aussie Tuba

    Aussie Tuba Member

    definitely. fingering can be confusing at first, gets easier. High E is open and low E is 1&2 so diagram written earlier was not as accurate as could have been.
     

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