Fingering help

Discussion in 'The Rehearsal Room' started by ABERDEEN LOON, Nov 17, 2006.

  1. ABERDEEN LOON

    ABERDEEN LOON Member

    Just to put you in the picture, I learnt to play brass on the trombone. Therefore as my technique developed on the slide as opposed to under the fingers.

    Although I started playing tuba on and off approx 6 years ago, I have never really worked on fingering technique. I have never really had much of a problem with parts, but I have noticed more recently that where the parts move into 3 flats (or past 4#,s) and I have running quavers etc., my fingers are getting tied in knots! In terms of hand position and finger position on the valves, I have not bad technique (it's not like the valves sit under the knuckles like some players).

    My question to all you pedology (not bad word for a friday morning eh?!) specialists out there. Can you suggest some exercises for fingering/lip coordination please? I am quite familiar with arban, but not sure what exercise would be the mose efficient use of my time. (don't have as much time to practice as I would like at the moment, due to my son being 2!)

    Cheers everone.
     
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  3. tpcornet12

    tpcornet12 Member

    My suggestion would be chromatic scales... start slowly and build up speed but always pay attention to rythm, the notes need to be as even as possible. You'll notice as you pick up speed that some notes trip over themselves - this is what you need to try and avoid.
     
  4. Sopha

    Sopha Active Member

    Good suggestion as the chromatic is being one of the most essentials anyway! Also care must be taken to push the valves well down, in order that the notes may be produced with fulness! As tpcornet12 said It is necessary at first to practise slowely, taking care to mark the time correctly. Also each one sould be played both accending and decending.

    Also minor and major scales would help you get you head around all the flat and sharps!
     
  5. Rob

    Rob Member

    Have to disagree about the chromatic scales, they're not going to help as if you're having trouble playing pieces in a particular 'key', when the number of flats/sharps in the key signature increases as you said, then chromatics are not related to that really.

    What you need to do is first get every single scale nailed, as loads of passages in pieces are based directly or indirectly around them, and then get as much practice as possible playing pieces in every key you can find. A great book to try is 'The Well Tempered Player' - play everything in that at a decent speed and no key signature will trouble you ever again!!! All you need to do is get used to reading music in the different keys, a lot of passages only LOOK difficult, when in fact once played they aren't.

    Cheers
     
  6. tpcornet12

    tpcornet12 Member

    You're right about playing in a particular key but would use the chromatics to improve co-ordination and improve fingering technique. Another thing I do, which is more of an annoying habit... is tap on tables. If you can tap a chromatic scale hard on a table and it be very rythmic - you're probably going to use good technique on your instrument. Probably best not doing this when you have company though!!!
     
  7. ABERDEEN LOON

    ABERDEEN LOON Member

    I should have guessed that Scales would be mentioned!!


    Well.... "needs must when the devil vomits down your tunic"
     
  8. Griffis

    Griffis Member


    Correct Mr. Richardson

    That is a great book, although I dared to open it up on the first page, the very first day I bought it, then it's been filed away under "Never to be opened again!" ;)

    Like the old proverb says, Practice really does make it better!! (just made that up now)
     
  9. on_castors

    on_castors Member

    Proper use of the 4th valve usually helps minimise some of the "knots" eg. C sharp/D flat on 4 & 2 is a lot tidier and easier to move up and down from than 12&3 as well as being better in tune, although I would have thought it would come easily enough for a trombonist coming from a Bflat/F instrument, so you probably use it well anyway! Sometimes the odd alternative fingering with the std. 3 valves as well as those with the 4th is handy too, although I have a bad habit of drifting back to thinking in 3valve fingering when flustered! It pays to look at the chart now and again to prove they still exist ;-)

    Come to think of it, What would I know?... I was self taught anyway
     
  10. ABERDEEN LOON

    ABERDEEN LOON Member

    To be honest, I tend to use the 4th most of the time instead of 1-3 etc. that is probably why the co-ordination of the 3rd finger is not all that good. I will stick to the old chromatics and also a fingering exercise that the trouble and strife got form Mr James a while back when she venture for a lesson. Next time I am in a decent music shop I will have a look for the books mentioned. (may be a while though, as I live up here in the NE of scotland (AKA the arctic circle) and if you are not woodwind or strings you are not catered for. There are so many defferent books out there for this kind of thing, but no point in buying one if it is not really what I am looking for.

    Tanks for tips: any more???
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2006
  11. Vickitorious

    Vickitorious Active Member

    Hmmm I'd probably reccommend the Allen Vizzutti book, Trumpet Method, Book 1 - Technical Studies.

    It's got all your warm ups and lip flexabilities in it and what not, but then it goes onto finger exercises which start off simple and then moves through the keys. Then theres tonguing exercises combined with finger exercises.

    It's a very good book. But very dear I think? :confused: It must be.. I've had mine covered so it doesn't get wrecked! :tongue::rolleyes:
     
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  13. Vickitorious

    Vickitorious Active Member

    oooooo another thing...

    Some studies maybe, ermm I don't know how to explain it. Just moving in steps through the scales.. ermm so C major would be:

    C D E C, D E F D, E F G E, and so on?..

    Don't use the 4th valve ;) Start slow and get faster everyday, increase by 3 metronome marks! :)

    and then go though all the scales in that way? I don't know how much sense that makes? :rolleyes: Sorry!
     
  14. Cochyn

    Cochyn Member

    Like everyone else said, chromatic scales, taking care each note is spaced evenly. Normally do these as annoying warm ups etc. LOL

    Most importantly, never let your hand slouch over the valves, always play near enough with the tips of your fingers...
     
  15. John Large

    John Large New Member

    Try page 91 of The Arban when you can play them all without fault at 120 bpm you should find your hand eye co-ordination to be a lot better!
     
  16. on_castors

    on_castors Member

    However by that time you will be on pretty poor terms with the neighbours, have an RSI and be very frayed from lack of sleep ;-)
     
  17. persins

    persins Member

    Scales of all kinds will help. Both standard and chromatic scales will aid in improving co-ordination. Starting slowly and working up the speed while concentrating on keeping the notes even and clear is also fantastic advice.
    When I was younger, part of my job role involved data entry. Using the numeric keypad more often and having to be accurate with it improved by co-ordination greatly. It also increased my bordom threshold!
    Didn't do much for co-ordinating it with lip flexibilities though.
     

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