Fanfare trumpet in G

Discussion in 'The Rehearsal Room' started by Rebel Tuba, Oct 11, 2015.

  1. Rebel Tuba

    Rebel Tuba Member

    I have been asked to play the Bass Fanfare trumpet (in G) for an upcoming event, and in preparation for this I have been looking for a fingering chart - to no avail. I'm wondering if anyone has a fingering chart for this beast??

    As a Bb player who does not transpose, and hasnt read in Bass clef for some 40 years, anyone who can help with a quick fix cheat or fingering chart I will be eternally grateful.
     
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  3. Cornet Nev.

    Cornet Nev. Member

    Quite a few questions which may need some answers before any real help can be given. The music you have to play is written for what instrument, and in what key if for another transposing instrument? If so what instrument? Also what staff, treble or bass cleff?
    Are you actually playing a bass fanfare trumpet in G or your own tuba in Bb?
    If it is anything like the odd trumpet like thing I have, the fingering is the same as cornet or ordinary trumpet except that the open low C is actually a concert G. In my case with my instrument that G is the one that sounds lower than the open C (Bb) of my cornet and in the same octave, is your instrument the same or a full octave or more lower?
     
  4. Rebel Tuba

    Rebel Tuba Member

    I will suss out tomorrow, however I believe it is called a fanfare trombone in G. A large valved fanfare trumpet. Will try and get some more answers tomorrow night at band rehearsal.
     
  5. Andrew Norman

    Andrew Norman Member

    Bass Fanfare Trumpet parts are normally written in Bass Clef at Concert Pitch - at least they were 35 years ago when I used to play one.
    This makes the bottom line of the Bass Stave a "Treble Clef C" for Brass Band readers. So if you can drop every note by one line or space there is an easy fix.
    Written Key signature of G (1 sharp) becomes a "Treble Clef" Key signature of C - so you add one flat or deduct one sharp from the Key signature in BC to get to your TC Key.
    It's 3.30am and I hope my brain is working properly - I WILL review this information later in the day when I get back home.
     
    MoominDave and Rebel Tuba like this.
  6. Andrew Norman

    Andrew Norman Member

    Hi
    I'm still pretty sure that my 3.30am post was correct so here is a fingering chart Hope it helps.
     
  7. MoominDave

    MoominDave Well-Known Member

    Andrew's post is exactly how I play the G bass trombone. You also need to make any accidental on what is now a "Treble Clef B" one accidental flatter. So if you have a note that comes out after adjustment as a B#, you play it as a B natural; nat -> b; b -> bb.

    It's the same thing as when you 'cheat' bass clef on an Eb bass, sharpening F, C and G accidentals - easy when your brain gets trained into it. Good luck!
     
  8. Andrew Norman

    Andrew Norman Member

    How did you get on ?
    It would be nice to know if our posts were of any help or not....
    Bass Fanfare is a horrible instrument to play - the one I used to suffer played like a Euphonium stuffed with pillows !
     

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