Errata-free test piece at a National Contest!!

Discussion in 'Classifieds' started by Gavin, Dec 10, 2007.

  1. Gavin

    Gavin Supporting Member

    News has emerged that a Test Piece chosen for the Swiss National Brass Band Championships was supplied to all the bands without an errata.

    ‘The Once and Future King’ by Andrew Baker was used by the Swiss Brass Band Federation as the 3rd section Test Piece at their recent National Championships. The piece was extremely well received by the audience, but has also hit home with the players and the organisers for the quality of the layout and printing and because no errata was needed.

    Gavin Pritchard (co-owner of the work’s publishers, JAGRINS) said: “In the current era of the Brass Band movement, it seems to be unheard of for a band to buy a test piece for a national competition without the piece being followed by an erratum (even Kapitol Promotions have a section on their website dedicated to Publishers’ errata!). To add insult to injury, most of the time there are several erratas, some even given out just days before the event!! It is hoped that this news item will contribute to putting this piece and the service the bands received, at the top of the pile.”

    Maybe now, other contest organisers will take note that errata-free Test Pieces are achievable and that British Brass Bands and the contest organisers themselves could and should, in the very near future, also be treated with the same care and respect that was displayed with the publishing of Andrew Baker’s piece ‘The Once and Future King’.
     
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  3. DannyCollin

    DannyCollin Member

    Nice one Gavin
     
  4. KMJ Recordings

    KMJ Recordings Supporting Member

    Aye, it's a shame the latest bumper crop of pieces couldn't be subjected to the same scrutiny before they're unleashed on the unwitting public if what I've heard is true :mad:

    Maybe once people have actually experienced how it should be, they'll take a stronger stance and not put up with some of the nasties that have been unleashed in the last few years.

    Good luck with it.
     
  5. Gavin

    Gavin Supporting Member

    Cheers for the messages :)

    It is indeed true what you have heard about the latest Test Pieces!! Like I pointed to in the news item, it's not fair for the bands & organisers to be treated this way.
     
  6. Thirteen Ball

    Thirteen Ball Active Member

    Respect is due to both composer and publisher for such a thorough job.

    I have enough trouble gettting the odd duff note out of 3 minute pieces I've written every note of!

    The nightmares of ironing every error out of a full length test-piece barely bear thinking about. A worthy achievement in itself!
     
  7. Anno Draconis

    Anno Draconis Well-Known Member

    Thanks, although I have to say that most of the credit is Gareth and Gavin's - they are (rightly) committed to ensuring that when bands pay for music, it's right the first time they get it.

    Although obviously we're justifiably proud, isn't it a shame that a new piece getting through without an errata list is a newsworthy event? Shouldn't this be the standard, rather than the exception? Speaking as a player, the next two test-pieces I'll be playing (Alberta Suite at Butlins and Three Part Invention at the area - for which we've shelled out a total of over £100) are immensely frustrating to work on because there are so many inconsistencies and errors - we have to wait for the errata sheet to know exactly what it is we're supposed to play. For instance, in the case of Alberta Suite, the last movement is a bit of a swine and the articulation of some of the semiquavers is inconsistently marked. If I spend my spare time over Christmas note-bashing only to discover when the errata sheet comes out a fortnight before the contest that I'm articulating it wrongly because my part is wrong, I'll be somewhat distressed :mad:

    Shouldn't every publishers' ambition be to get it right first time, every time?
     

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