Definition of a Silver Band

Discussion in 'The Rehearsal Room' started by alanl58, Feb 6, 2007.

  1. kensar

    kensar Member

    Messages:
    44
    Location:
    Whitwell. WORKSOP
    Nothing to do with "Silver" but I always wondered why any band would or even could be "Temperance" ?
     
  2. Lawrencediana

    Lawrencediana Member

    Messages:
    251
    Location:
    Bournemouth
    That's because a lot of bands were formed to provide music to the methodist ministry and players were only allowed to join if the took the pledge to abstinance. However it wasn't long before bandsmen showed their true colours and the longing for the tavern and separation from the methodist traditions.
     
  3. Husband of Satchmo Shaz

    Husband of Satchmo Shaz New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Long Eaton, Derbyshire
    One further source of information is "Brass Roots: A Hundred Years of Brass Bands And Their Music 1836-1936 by Roy Newsome, ISBN 1-85928-168-0, published by Ashgate Publishing Limited". In it, Roy Newsome states that during the early 1900s many bands switched to playing silver-plated instruments and started calling themselves silver bands.

    One point to consider is that a full set of silver-played instruments in 1907 cost £300 from Boosey: a lot of money at the time, although bands could pay in instalments (The Long Eaton Silver Prize Band ordered the instruments and then launched a public appeal). Hence, until the other bands caught up, playing on silver-plated instruments would have been a considerable status symbol, particularly compared to band still playing on raw brass (no lacquer then). I suspect that many of the new silver prize bands would have either been sponsored (a works band), of a high standard or commanded considerable good will. The newspaper article announcing the formation of the new Long Eaton Silver Prize band stated “Under the name of Temperance the band did a good deal of charity work and the appeal is made with confidence for help”. Alternatively, being able to command high concert fees and contest prize winnings would help. Competition for public money in Long Eaton at the time would have been intense: there were at least six other brass bands in Long Eaton and the neighbouring villages. The local Salvation Army converted in 1906, whilst the Town Band would have had to fundraise to attend Crystal Palace the same year.

    The Long Eaton Temperance Prize Band was affiliated to the Temperance Society. When its members resigned to form the Silver Prize Band, all of the equipment had to be returned to the Temperance Society. I don’t think the Long Eaton Temperance Prize Band was particularly associated with the Methodist Church: they had their own brass band in Long Eaton, the Mount Tabor Band, later the Mount Tabor Mission Silver Band. I have had a quick look on the internet and it appears that Temperance movement was multi-denominational, involving Catholics, Quakers, the Salvation Army, Baptists and Congregationalists. I don’t know for certain, but I suspect that all Temperance Bands were affiliated to and funded by a Temperance Society, either the National Temperance Federation (founded 1884) or one of the many local societies that existed beforehand. Forming a Temperance Band would have been one way of enticing the working classes away from the “evils of alcohol”. It even worked for a time.....
     
  4. Lawrencediana

    Lawrencediana Member

    Messages:
    251
    Location:
    Bournemouth
    That's the good thing about tmp there is always someone to put you right.
     
  5. lintie

    lintie New Member

    Messages:
    3
    tubafran do you know anything about Yorkshire Main Band, I know of Killamarsh as I was born in South Yorks. My grandad Elisha Groves played cornet and later horn for the above band circa 1924, they won a contest at Crystal Palace too, grandad winning a new cornet!
    Now just to show I am on the ball, I am a cornet player for Stedfast Silver Band Greenock, all our instruments are now silver. Some brass trumpets were around when I joined but now there are no brass trumpets, indeed no tumpets at all, all cornets and of course other usual band instruments.
    Thanks for your input.
     
  6. tubafran

    tubafran Active Member

    Messages:
    2,637
    Location:
    Sheffield
    Sorry dont have any personal knowledge of this band but if you look on this forum there is a link to an excellent resource on old bands IBEW

    found this:

    Yorkshire Main Colliery Band Formed after World War 1. Still active in the 1980s. Also known as Ceramia Goldthorpe Colliery Band, Goldthorpe (Ceramia) Band Yorkshire Main Goldthorpe Colliery Band See: Yorkshire Main Colliery Band
     
  7. rikster

    rikster New Member

    Messages:
    77
    Location:
    sussex
    I havent read all the replies, sorry, but I was always led to believe from my grand-dad that the terms were used to identify public subscription bands (brass bands) where bands literally knocked on doors for funds, and those sponsored by a factory or whatever (silver bands). I dont know if this is right but seems plausible. Where the term "prize" fits in to this I cant give a view, unless it was an early attempt at self publicity.
     
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