Can anyone tell me anything about this cornet?

Discussion in 'The Rehearsal Room' started by New South Welshman, Nov 28, 2009.

  1. New South Welshman

    New South Welshman New Member

    Can anyone tell me anything about this cornet?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. theMouthPiece Related Searches

    Find more discussions like this one
    anything
    anyone
    IMG
    cornet
  3. Al

    Al Member

    If you search "Besson" and "serial numbers" you will be able to find the approximate date of manufacture.
     
  4. GordonH

    GordonH Member

    I am confused. Is that designed to play in Bb and Eb or maybe Bb and C?
    I have never seen that arrangement with two leadpipes before. In those days it was mainly removeable shanks.
     
  5. GJG

    GJG Well-Known Member

    With only one set of valve slides it seems unlikely it could be Bb/Eb. Bb/C is possible, although again tuning would be difficult. Seems more likely to me it's just an alternative system for a Bb/A cornet.
     
  6. New South Welshman

    New South Welshman New Member

    I haven't played it yet. My dad bought it at auction the other day and I'll be going down to play it over the Christmas break. My dad's not a bad player and gets a C (concert Bb) out on the longer configuration and a slightly flat C# (concert B) on the shorter configuration. The serial number indicates a 1920s build (British Army went to A440 in 1928) so I'm guessing that this instrument was built to be able to play in bands who had made the change to low pitch (A440) and those who hadn't yet purchased the new instruments and were stuck in high pitch (A456).

    This was also an instrument built for the Australian market so this change took a great deal longer that it did in the UK, making an instrument like this quite useful.

    I don't know if the A456 crook (the shorter one) was an addition or was actually built like that. I'll let you all know after some more research.
     
  7. New South Welshman

    New South Welshman New Member

  8. Al

    Al Member

  9. New South Welshman

    New South Welshman New Member

    Oops. I read the serial number incorrectly (read 5 serial numbers instead of the 6).

    The instrument was made in 1923. This makes much more sense. An instrument built during the changing period between high and low (standard) pitch that could do both jobs.

    Anyone know who JJS was? (engraved on the bell)
     

Share This Page