Book Recommendations

Discussion in 'Thread Games & Totally Random...' started by mikelyons, Oct 14, 2009.

  1. mikelyons

    mikelyons Supporting Member

    I just thought I'd share this with you. I'm reading a book called "It's Your Time You're Wasting" by Frank Chalk. It could have been written by my and the buqqer has definitely pinched some of my lines/apocrypha and so on. I'm sure he did some supply at my school and it's a real eye opener for those of you not in the teaching profession as well as those who are or are thinking of being.

    The first story about the sticky labels had me wetting myself and squealing with laughter, at the same time that I recalled a similar lesson spent mainly pulling my hair out while Y7s struggled with the exact same task. Odd how different such things seem when you're reading about them rather than living them.

    :D:oops:
     
  2. mikelyons

    mikelyons Supporting Member

    Does nobody else read? :roll:
     
  3. MrsDoyle

    MrsDoyle Supporting Member

    I read Mike, as a part-time librarian, but I am waiting for a new book to come out on November 5th
     
  4. Thirteen Ball

    Thirteen Ball Active Member

    I read. Primarily Military history.

    Just finished a book on the battle of Assaye in 1803. The last siege of Gawilghur next....
     
  5. mikelyons

    mikelyons Supporting Member

    I was hoping people might reccommend books to other tMPers who may have similar interests? I'm sure there's more than Andi on here who is interested in military history, for example, and certainly more than me interested in science fiction and/or fantasy. Without wishing to encourage too much gushiness, there may be people interested in romantic fiction (preferably not Mills and Boon) and so on who have found a book which they would like to share with everyone else. Let's have the title and author, at least, so we can investigate further - or am I being too radio 4?
     
  6. MrsDoyle

    MrsDoyle Supporting Member

    OK then Mike

    An Utterly Exasperated History of Modern Britain / O'Farrell, John
    (Librarian habits kicking in there)

    Great for those who like a laugh and those interested in recent history. It is a continuation of his previous book about the 15th-20th centuries, but I found it was easy enough to get into despite not having read any of Mr. O'Farrell's previous books.
    Strange, isn't it, that sometimes the comedic approach to history works?
     
  7. Getzonica

    Getzonica Active Member

    Lord of the Flies is a good read. Quite shocking really - makes you realise some of the sad truths about humans and makes you question whether children really should always be 'innocent'.
     
  8. mikelyons

    mikelyons Supporting Member

    Children (generally) are born innocent, but that innocence is very easily tarnished as they grow up.
     
  9. MrsDoyle

    MrsDoyle Supporting Member

    ^^ I once met someone who read "Lord of the Files"
     
  10. Thirteen Ball

    Thirteen Ball Active Member

    Lord of the flies was one of my set works at GCSE. I thought it was apalling it then. I've since re-read it and I still think it's one of the most tedious and dreary books I've ever read. The character who's supposed to represent humanity (Piggy) is the most annoying, cringing, complaining, whining little git in any book I've ever read and it comes as something of a relief when he is pushed off a cliff. Just a shame it doesn't happen sooner.

    The only book I've re-read and actually enjoyed from my set texts was Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird." If you haven't read it, it's only about four quid from penguin classics and will genuinely stay with you for ever.
     
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  12. MrsDoyle

    MrsDoyle Supporting Member

    I agree. I absolutely hated the book.
     
  13. Getzonica

    Getzonica Active Member

    I thought Piggy was quite an intelligent boy. It was just that he was poor and different that the others didn't like him. Jack on the other hand is so selfish.
     
  14. MrsDoyle

    MrsDoyle Supporting Member

    Are we actually having a cultured discussion? :D
     
  15. David Mann

    David Mann Member

    I didn't enjoy Lord of the Flies at all, maybe because it was forced on me at school, but I will still read To Kill a Mockingbird from time to time - it's a wonderful book.
    I'm currently reading a collection of short essays on sport by Philip Delerm, entitled La Tranchee d'Aremburg.
     
  16. Getzonica

    Getzonica Active Member

    I had to read both lord of the Flies and to kill a Mocking bird. Didn't like lord of the Flies at first but once I got into it s really began to enjoy it. I hated the film versions of the book though.

    An inspector calls is good. Had to read that for school too but I really enjoyed it.
     
  17. David Mann

    David Mann Member

    I'm an obsessive reader and will read pretty well anything, but especially like;

    Novels that give a perspective of Britain in the early 20th century (Orwell and JB Priestley, but any other recommendations welcome).
    Travelogues - HV Morton's In Search of England, JB Priestley's English Journey, Bill Bryson, Paul Theroux..
    Novels / semi autobiographical works in French (Zola, Pagnol, Signol)

    I've also recently discovered the genius of Stephen King (Dark Tower series in particular) - shows that literature (or is it mere fiction?) can be both popular and well written.
     
  18. themusicalrentboy

    themusicalrentboy Active Member

    one of my set books for GCSE was 1984. I wasn't particularly impressed, but then I hate dissecting books as you go through them - I might enjoy it more if I could just take a couple of days and read it again without having to analyse all of it.
     
  19. mikelyons

    mikelyons Supporting Member

    Before you do, Chris, just look around you and then read it again!
     
  20. David Mann

    David Mann Member

    Orwell, then. IMHO 1984 and Animal Farm aren't his best books (although undeniably the best known). I prefer Keep The Aspidistra Flying and Coming Up For Air. Most of his novels, in some way, deal with a character who rebels against the expectations of his or her place in an unyielding society, whether that be the British Empire (Burmese Days), the church (a Clergyman's Daughter), suburban middle-class values (Keep The Aspidistra Flying and Coming Up For Air) or a totalitarian regime (1984).
    I also love Orwell's non-fiction work - Down And Out In Paris And London, The Road To Wigan Pier, Collected Essays. His essay, Why I Write, is concise, informative and inspirational.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2009
  21. mikelyons

    mikelyons Supporting Member

    There's a neat little book called "How to lie with statistics" by Darrell Huff which is a great starter for mathematics/stats students!
     
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