Batons !

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by Paul Batson, Jan 9, 2014.

  1. Paul Batson

    Paul Batson New Member

    Hi. Just joined this forum to let conductors know of my baton-making service.
    I make bespoke batons to your exact specific requirements. If interested, why not check out my website batsonsbatons.co.uk or my facebook page of the same name.
    I started making batons for a top classical conductor who was dissatisfied with what's available in the shops.
    Many conductors use any old bit of stick or a pencil etc and others feel that the baton is akin to their instrument and worth getting right.
    Any comments/interest?
     
  2. GJG

    GJG Well-Known Member

    Prefer not to use a baton at all ...

    Sorry!
     
  3. Paul Batson

    Paul Batson New Member

    I hear you!
    My first conducting teacher only had one arm but he got more from whatever ensemble he was working with than I ever did with a stick!
     
  4. VegasGeorge

    VegasGeorge Member

    It all depends on the conductor, of course. But some of the loveliest, most effective conducting I've seen has been with a longer stick. When a talented conductor really knows how to use it, a fair size baton is a marvelous tool.
     
  5. Paul Batson

    Paul Batson New Member

    Oh yes.
    Commonly I get asked to make them between about 10 inches up to 17 1/2 inches.
    Just to prove to myself that I could do it, I recently made a 21 inch stick, very thin (unlike factory-made batons)
    I am reliably informed that Sir Adrian Boult used one this length and many of his performances remain unsurpassed. I like to think that the stick made a difference!

    I think balance is important to a lot of conductors as much as length.
    Nearly all the sticks I make balance on the first finger although I have made them with a heavier handle as well as 'weight-forward' ie where the stick is heavier.
     
  6. MoominDave

    MoominDave Well-Known Member

    I believe batons (at least in bands) used to generally be rather longer and thicker than they are today. Look at the monster wielded by this chap! As a historical footnote, I think this is Robert Rimmer, brother of the more famous William.
     

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