Audition Tips

Discussion in 'The Rehearsal Room' started by tofaffy, Feb 18, 2008.

  1. tofaffy

    tofaffy New Member

    Does anyone have any audition tips? I will be auditioning for the Alabama School of Fine Arts March 8th.

    I am playing Allegro Vivace, Apres un Reve, and Fantasy for Trombone (With piano accomp.).

    Thanks in advanced!
     
  2. brassneck

    brassneck Active Member

    Doug Yeo has some interesting information here.
     
  3. GordonH

    GordonH Member

    Play as yourself.
    Never trya nd be the next *****, try and be the first YOU.
     
  4. Bass Trumpet

    Bass Trumpet Active Member

    Take it from me, I've done lots! If you fail to prepare, you prepare to fail, simple as that. Run your programme every day and highlight the bits you are uncomfortable with, then concentrate on those sections more. In auditions for colleges, they are also looking for potential, so don't forget to play musically with a nice sound! I could go on, but I'm off out in a minute. I'll contribute in greater length later.

    Best of luck!
     
  5. tofaffy

    tofaffy New Member

    Thanks for all your replies! It's a high school by the way. I'll be going into the 9th grade.
     
  6. Bass Trumpet

    Bass Trumpet Active Member

    I assumed you were older! That said, you've picked a demanding programme, so I'll be looking over my shoulder soon ;)! As I said earlier, they'll be looking for potential, so do try and look further than the actual notes. Perhaps you could listen to other pieces by the same composers to get an idea of the style you need to play in. You'll find that, if you feel confident about knowing the music (I don't just mean the notes, but the style) that confidence will come across when you play. I am sure your teacher could give you some tips on this.

    Something I've always believed in is this: Make sure you play every little detail not for yourself, but for an imaginary old lady at the back. Every staccato, legato, phrase mark, cresc, dim, etc. etc. should be there for all to hear, not just those within three feet of the music stand.

    I sincerely hope you achieve you goal and are offered a place. With hard work and dedication a career in music is available to everyone, but only if you are prepared to put up with having no money, driving a ten-year-old car and having to work every hour God sends to make ends meet:biggrin:
     
  7. JesTperfect!

    JesTperfect! Member

    Don't just run your program through once a day-do it twice on the trot. If you can do it twice comfortably, then when it comes to the day and you noly have to do it once, it will be easy. Best advice anyone ever gave me.
     
  8. i Knw alot of things are easier sed than done but ive had to do alot of auditions and been put in nervous situations recently and ive learnt to just be cool about everything, ask yourself 'wat is the point of getting worked up?' surely its not a life or death situation? (i hope :confused: ).

    When i auditioned for Birmingham conservatoire i found that you can gain easy points by just learning your scales. back then i was terrible and screwed up A melodic minor! (ive spent more work on scales now and i can now play A minor, harmonic and melodic....... just :p )

    when it comes down to the audition if you have a option of choosing the order of the audition then get the bits your most worried about out the way first. And remeber once in the audition if you mess something up then its gone nothing can be done about it and you just have to get on with it, just dont worry about mistakes everyone makes them in adutions

    'JesTperfect' is right about running the program, it really does helps me alot and once your in ther dont try and be a hero, do what you've done in the practice room no more.

    This might be useless info, but hopefully some of it can help!

    Good luck in the audition! :tup
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2008
  9. Steve

    Steve Active Member

    Just blow the trombone and see what comes out mate!

    I was successful with my interviews for University but I think that had as much to do with my presentation as it did my playing. Know what the place you are auditioning at does better than anywhere else and their previous success stories, stroke their ego if you get the chance and go looking like someone with career aspirations rather than the next person in jeans and a hoodie!

    You cant control who will be the best player there on the day, some little musical prodigy could walk in at any time. You can control who will be the best 'individual' on the day though, sell yourself!

    I am guessing some form of programme notes wouldn't be a bad idea if you already know what you are playing, you could even put a short biography of achievements in a small handout card for the panel with the notes.

    Bon chance!

     
  10. tofaffy

    tofaffy New Member

    Thanks

    I wanted to say thanks to everyone who replied. I was just gonna make sure y'all knew, I'm talking about Birmingham, Alabama NOT THE UK! :p I just realized I think you guys are talking about Birmingham UK or w/e. hah! Yeah I had my lesson tonight and it went well. I have two more weeks to prepare so yeah It's crunch time!

    Jared
     
  11. theMouthPiece Visitor Guide

    Find more discussions like this one
    anyone
    Alabama School of Fine Arts
    Fantasy for Trombone
    Allegro Vivace
    Apres un Reve
  12. Ryan06

    Ryan06 Member

    another good thing to work on is Dynamics. They'll be looking to see if you can play dynamics really well and not just play LOUD all the time. Be Confident, and have fun with it!

    best of luck!
     
  13. Cornet Nev.

    Cornet Nev. Member

    Birmingham USA or Birmingham UK doesn't matter, all the above is still relevant. However I wish you the best of luck, and remember also the most famous and rich musicians may not be the best musicians. John Lennon and Paul McCartney of the Beatles (a bit before your time perhaps) couldn't even read music when they first started, but look at the popularity of what they wrote and how famous and rich they became. Sometimes it is not what you play or even how you play it, it is who you are and how you come across to your audience that makes the difference, put your own feeling into what you do. The world is full of technically brilliant musicians, but those who make it big put some feeling into it as well.
     

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