Advice on choice of new trumpet

Discussion in 'The Rehearsal Room' started by Lady T, Jan 26, 2008.

  1. Lady T

    Lady T New Member

    Hi all,

    No time no visit.

    A question for those more experienced than myself:

    Am currently playing a BAch TR300 and looking to move to more professional - had always wanted a Bach Strad but a friend of mine reckons he can get me a good deal on a Yamaha - any suggestions?

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. cookie2

    cookie2 Member

    I have a Bach Strad trumpet and would thoroughly recommend it. Although I don't play it very often since I left Uni (a blooming long time ago! :eek: ) it's one of those instruments that you can take out of the case after 6 months and play as if you just put it down. I really don't have a negative thing to say about it.
    I've heard people say the Bachs can be a bit hit and miss, but honestly, mine's a beauty. Just have a good go on any you'll potentially buy and be sure.
    Happy shoppping :)
     
  3. Lady T

    Lady T New Member

    Thanks - the one i had tried a few years ago was lovely too! by the way, you should take it out more often :)
     
  4. sudcornet

    sudcornet Member

    I have a Yamaha 6335H. Very good quality instrument....build and design.

    I've used it for both classical and swing genres and (with a subtle change of mpc) found it eminently suitable for both.

    It's a large bore so you'll certainly notice the difference (just as you would with a strad).

    Might not be so good if you play standing up a lot as it's quite heavy...for a lighter weight, my mate has just bought a Stomvi (not sure which model) and loves it.

    Would certainly recommend the Yamaha tho'.....works for me.
     
  5. cookie2

    cookie2 Member

    I know, I know! I really should, it is lovely. Find I don't practice the flugel as often as I should though...
    (for the benefit of any players from Stannington who might see this, that's only 6 nights a week instead of 7 ;) )
     
  6. Vegasbound

    Vegasbound Active Member

    The Bach ML37 is still the industry standard........
     
  7. trumpetmike

    trumpetmike Active Member

    TRY EVERYTHING BEFORE YOU BUY

    DO NOT buy an instrument because somebody else says it is wonderful.
    DO NOT buy an instrument because "everyone else plays one."
    DO NOT buy an instrument unless it is the right one FOR YOU.

    The Bach Strad trumpets are not all fantastic, but those that are good tend to be very good (and those that are not tend to be awful). I went trumpet shopping with a student last year and he found a Bach Strad that he liked, but it had already been sold - the shop brought out two other "identical" instruments (same model, same leadpipe, same plating - everything should be the same) and they were TERRIBLE - the intonation was poorer, the sound didn't ring, they were a real disappointment after the first one.
    Bach might well still be the "industry standard" over here, but a huge number of players have had their Bachs tweaked/modified. In the USA the Bach reign is no longer as clear cut as it once was, even the Chicago Symphony Orchestra (who own a set of matching Strads) have moved off them and now all play Yamaha.

    For my money, Yamaha makes superb trumpets. They have a great tendency for reliability and consistency (vitally important if you are buying an instrument without having played it beforehand). There are people who will say that Yamaha instruments have no soul to the sound, or that their tone is vanilla. I would disagree and would suggest that they listen to people like Al Vizzutti, Jens Lindemann, Chris Martin, Wayne Bergeron, Rex Richardson, Vince DiMartino or the Canadian Brass and then consider the truthfulness of that statement.

    My advice to you would be to do what I get my students in a similar position to do. Go to a shop with a large variety of brands and models, then TRY EVERYTHING. If you are able to - take along another pair of ears that you trust (I like to accompany my students when making this sort of purchase). If you want a list of makes that I think you should try (alongside Yamaha and Bach):
    B&S
    Kanstul
    Schilke
    (if your budget allows)

    Choose the one that works FOR YOU, with YOU on the end.
     
  8. Vegasbound

    Vegasbound Active Member

    DO NOT buy an instrument because somebody else says it is wonderful.
    DO NOT buy an instrument because "everyone else plays one."
    DO NOT buy an instrument unless it is the right one FOR YOU.

    I agree whole heartedly with the sentiment

    The Bach Strad trumpets are not all fantastic, but those that are good tend to be very good (and those that are not tend to be awful). Bach might well still be the "industry standard" over here, but a huge number of players have had their Bachs tweaked/modified. In the USA the Bach reign is no longer as clear cut as it once was.

    True! bach's have always been inconsistent....a good bach is hard to beat


    Al Vizzutti, Jens Lindemann, Chris Martin, Wayne Bergeron, Rex Richardson, Vince DiMartino or the Canadian Brass

    Worth remembering the above players are paid to play a certain brand of instrument.......nothing wrong with that and Yamaha are consistent....

    My advice to you would be to do what I get my students in a similar position to do. Go to a shop with a large variety of brands and models, then TRY EVERYTHING. If you are able to - take along another pair of ears that you trust (I like to accompany my students when making this sort of purchase).
    Choose the one that works FOR YOU, with YOU on the end.

    Good advice.......
     
  9. trumpetmike

    trumpetmike Active Member

    Much as, in some cases, this is true (not always and not in the way that you would expect) would any of them sacrifice their music-making for the small amount of money that Yamaha might give them?
    If they sounded terrible on Yamaha instruments I very much doubt that any of them would play those instruments.
     
  10. Vegasbound

    Vegasbound Active Member

    I don't think these players would sound bad no matter what they played....but for the small differences between horns then money would be a consideration!!
     
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  12. GJG

    GJG Well-Known Member

    Well, this is of course all based on supposition, but despite the alleged "small differences between horns" you mention, I would be very surprised if players of that calibre would perform (given the extreme demands of the repertoire involved) on instruments with which they were not 100% happy, no matter what the "sponsors" paid them. After all, what's a reputation worth?
     
  13. Vegasbound

    Vegasbound Active Member

    True...but as MD of a band hypothetically speaking ...a company came and offered your band sponsorship for 3 years, but stipulated that the band must use their instruments and say your 1st trombone player didn't like their instruments but prefered the horn he had....you wouldn't take the money ??
     
  14. GJG

    GJG Well-Known Member

    ... Not really comparing "like with like", is it ... ?

    [besides, it wouldn't be the first time a trombone player had his preferred instrument modified to carry the distinctive counterweight of a different manufacturer, just to keep a sponsor happy, would it? ;) ]
     
  15. Vegasbound

    Vegasbound Active Member

    Your not suggesting that we trombone players would do a thing like that !!!! LOL

    I agree with all of Trumpet Mikes advice on buying an instrument....and there isn't a lot between most makes of Pro quality models except personal Choice.

    Trumpet Mike starts by saying don't buy an instrument because.......then gives a list of players who ensorse a particular brand, that was all and we have strayed far from the initial enquiry.....

    So Lady T.......try all the makes and models you can....ask your teacher/friend and then buy what you like.

    Oh and GJG that curved brace on the king is hard to conceal!!!
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2008
  16. GJG

    GJG Well-Known Member

    Very true. But substituting a Sovereign counterweight for a Conn counterweight ... ? Or a Yamaha, or a Bach ...?
     
  17. WhatSharp?

    WhatSharp? Active Member

    I went through this ordeal recently ( and very good fun it was too! :D ). Best thing I could say is :

    a) Think of your budget
    b) Always try the one you want to buy ( as in don't buy mail order, unless you 100% sure of your supplier ).
    c) Look at alternatives ( and don't forget 2nd hand )

    I recently bought a Xeno RGS super instrument... for me.. I very nearly went for a B&S challenger II but it had a slightly darker sound.
     
  18. Vegasbound

    Vegasbound Active Member

    I have not done anything like that......although I have heard rumours that in days gone by it did happen....

    It raises the question what do you do if your lead cornet endorses a particular brand and the band signs a deal with a rival company. ?....
     
  19. BrianT

    BrianT Member

    Take someone with you so you can do blind testing. They can hand you an instrument without you knowing what it is. Then you play it unbiassed. If you have a selection of instruments with say £700 spread of prices, and you know that you're holding one of the more expensive ones it's very hard to not to expect it to be better than the cheaper ones. Playing blind helps eliminate this. Also helps eliminate brand bias - you already play a Bach, so if you might be biassed towards a new Bach.

    And take your old trumpet, your old mouthpiece and some well known music along when you do the try-out. Then you don't have to rely on your memory so much.

    Your helper can also give you an idea about how the sound travels. Better still if they play too - you can listen to them, which will give you an idea of how you will sound, as instruments sound different to the player as to someone more remote.

    Also, get the shop to recommend a selection. Then test without looking at the price. As you buy instruments so rarely, you may decide that it's worth spring the extra few hundred. Or you may decide there's nothing to be gained by spending all that extra money.
     
  20. GordonH

    GordonH Member

    OK, I am going to Monette-ise you now without you having to actually pay for one of his instruments.

    Here is how he fits players to instruments:

    He works out what your internal sound concept is.
    i.e. what do you want to sound like tone wise and what is your tone naturally like. Then he asks a lot about what kind of music you play and in what settings. He will then work out what style of trumpet is likely to work for you (lightweight, heavyweight etc).

    He then does other things relating to your pitch and how you breathe and does things with the tapers in the instrument to allow for that, but you can't really take that into account with an off the shelf instrument.

    What you CAN do is think about your sound concept and playing style.
    Then cross off your list any instrument that does not meet those criteria.
    For example, if you have a broad tone and play in an orchestra then you probably don't want a lightweight Benge trumpet.

    Once you have a shortlist of ones that are in the right ball park you can go and play them and see what they sound like. Realistically you need an instrument for a while to test it though which can be difficult as you want to hear what it will sound like far away as well as close up.

    What you want ultimately is an instrument which will support the way you play so you don't have to fight it.

    My favourite trumpets over the years have included:

    A large bore Selmer Paris I paid £50 for.
    A Yamaha 6335HS that I bought new and played for over 10 years.

    Both fitted the way I wanted to supported me to be more musical, which has to be the ultimate objective here (rather than suiting anyone else's prejudices).
     

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